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ii i Six inches of the finest Irish liutm ;for lining, six inches of a coarser f Embroidery cotton, No. 40, and cotton, No. 3S.

Yob. morning wear there is nothing so pretty as a set of linen collar and cuffs, and ornamented with a small sprig worked in the neatest satin stitch, like
that shown in our illustration, are, of course, more uncommon. The pattern should be copied in pencil on the corners of the collar, and in the centre of the
cuffs ;it should be well traced to give it a raised appearance, and then neatly sewn over. When both the sprigs are worked, the collar should be lined,
running that and the lining together on the wrong side, and turning it over and stitching it twice on the right side, as indicated by the white lines around
the edge of the pattern. These little sprigs would have rt very pretty effect worked in scarlet ingrain embroidery cotton, stitching the two outer lines in
the same colored cotton to match. A band of colored cambric, either bright red or mauve, might be stitched on to form au outer border to the collar, and
in this style would be very effective.

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GODEY'S

'abp ^ook attir Magapt

PHILADELPHIA, MAY, 18G2.

EASTERN RAMBLES AND REMINISCENCES.

JERUSALEM.

In many a heap the ground
Hearee, as though Rain, in a frantic mood,
Had done his utmost. Here and there appears,
As left to show his handiwork—not ours,
An idle column, a half-buried arch,
A wall of some great temple.

Along the Sacred Vv"ay,
Hither tho triumph canio, aud. winding round
With acclamation and the martial clang
Of instrument*, and cars laden with spoil,
Stopp'd at the Bacred stair that then appear'd,
Then through tho darkness broke, ample, star-bright.
As though it led to heaven.

Tfow all is changed; and here, as in the wild,
Tin: day is silent, dreary as tho night;
Kona stirring, save the herdsman and his herd,
Savago alike; or they that would exploro,
Discuss, and learnedly. Kooeus.

Leaving the devout pilgrims to kiss "the Stone of Unction," we passed through a vast throng of people, in which we recognized Turkish, Aral), and Greek soldiers, mingled with Armenian, Greek, Coptish, and Latin priests. Such a Babel of worshippers and languages, such a variety of costumes and countenances, and such a mixture of expressed passions and feelings, I never remember to have heard or seen collected together iu ouo place before or since that time.

"Now, Signor, look right to the Calvary, upstairs, where old man pray," shouted our guide, in a loud voice; and therefore following liim, we commenced ascending a narrow, dark staircase (31*) of eight-and-tweuty winding steps, nineteen of which are of wood, and run rip the sides of the church wall, the remainder l>eing formed from the solid rock. Many weary

> See Plan of Holy Sepulchre at pago 33.5, April numlier.

30*

pilgrims pass over these steps during the day, and to

*' Calvary's mournful mountain climb."

Calvary, or, as it is sometimes called, "Golgotha, that is to Bay, the place of a skull"— because, according to tradition, the Bkull of Adam was deposited there by Melchisedek—is about 110 feet southeast of the sepulchre; the upper part of it (K) is level, and forms a platform 47 feet square, on which is a chapel divided into two parts, and separated by arches. Ouo is paved with mosaic, hung with tapestry, and lighted by lamps, whose dim light, shed upon the aged or careworn faces of the devotee?, imparts a singular appearance to the whole. This is called the Chapel of the Cross (35), and the guide, pointing to a silver plate under tho altar, at the eastern extremity of the other, informed us that it marked the spot where the foot of the cross rested, while on either side he showed us the holes where the crosses of the two thieves were fixed (33). A few paces from these is along narrow opening, with brass bars over it. The guide removed the metal coverinc, and passed alighted taper into the fissure, which is about three feet long and three inches wide; the edges being rough and corresponding, really appear to be a rent in the rock (34). This is said to have taken place when our Saviour, about the ninth hour, being in the agonies of death, cried out with a loud voice from the cross, "Eli, Eli, lama sabaohthani?" (Matt, xxvii. 46, 51). The Greeks say that the soul of the bad felon went to perdition through this rent. Adjoining the place where the crosses were placed is tho Chapel of the Crucifixion (32), but as there was not anything remarkable about it, we descended the staircase, and tnrn

439

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JERUSALEM.

In many a heap the ground
Heaves, as though Rutn, iu a frantic mood,
Had done his utmost. Here and there appears,
As left to show his handiwork—not ours,
An idle column, a half-buried arch,
A wall of some great temple.

Along the Sacred War,
Hither the triumph came, and, winding round
With acclamation and the martial clang
or Instruments and cars laden with spoil,
Stopp'd at the sacred stair that then appear'd,
Then through the darkness broke, ample, star-bright.
As though it led to heaven.

Now all is changed; and here, as in the wild,
The day is silent, dreary as the night;
None stirring, save the herdsman and his herd,
Savage aliko; or they that would explore,
Discuss, and learnedly. Rooehs.

Leaving the devout pilgrims to kiss "the Stone of Unction," we passed through a vast throng of people, in which we recognized Turkish, Arab, and Greek soldiers, mingled with Armenian, Greek, Coptish, and Latin priests. Such a Babel of worshippers and languages, such a variety of costumes and countenances, and such a mixture of expressed passions and feelings, I never remember to have heard or seen collected together in one place before or since that time.

"Now, Signor, look right to the Calvary, upstairs, where old man pray," shouted our guide, in a loud voice; and therefore following him, we commenced ascending a narrow, dark staircase (31*) of eight-and-tweuty winding steps, nineteen of which are of wood, and run up the sides of the church wall, the remainder being formed from the solid rock. Many weary

t See Plan of Holy Sepulchre at page 333, April number.

3(i*

pilgrims pass over these steps during the day, and to

"Calvary's mournful mountain climb."

Calvary, or, as it is sometimes called, "Golgotha, that is to say, the place of a skull"— because, according to tradition, the skull of Adam was deposited there by Melchisedek—is about 110 feet southeast of the sepulchre; the upper part of it (K) is level, and forms a platform 47 feet square, on which is a chapel divided into two parts, and separated by arches. Onii is paved with mosaic, hung with tapestry, and lighted by lamps, whose dim light, shed upon the aged or careworn faces of the devotees, imparts a singular appearance to the whole. This is called the Chapel of the Cross (35), and the guide, pointing to a silver plate under the altar, at the eastern extremity of the other, informed us that it marked the spot where the foot of the cross rested, while on either side he showed us the holes where the crosses of the two thieves were fixed (33). A few paces from these is along narrow opening, with brass bars over it. The guide removed the metal covering, and passed a lighted taper into the fissure, which is about three feet long and three inches wide; the edges being rough and corresponding, really appear to be a rent in the rock (34). This is said to have taken place when our Saviour, about the ninth hour, being in the agonies of death, cried out with a loud voice from the cross, "Eli, Eli, lama sabachthaui?" (Matt. xxvii. 46, 51). The Greeks say that the soul of the bad felon went to perdition through this rent. Adjoining the place where the crosses were placed is the Chapel of the Crucifixion (32), but as there was not anything remarkable about it, we descended the staircase, and turn-

439

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