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« If it were not consistent with the stricteft “purity of character, I should answer no; but " when I reflect upon the innocence, the fim“plicity, the moral beauty of the choice you

make, I then regard the duty you owe to yourself as superior to all others, which are

falsely called natural ; whereas, if you follow “this in preference, you obey nature herself: “ If you were of an age too childish to be al« lowed to know what suits you beft, or, if

being old enough to be intitled to a choice, « you wanted wit to make one, there would be doubt in the case ; nay,

I will

go

so far as " to say, that if Clemens was a man of judg

ment superior to your own, I should be “ staggered with his opposition ; but if truth

may ever be spoken, it may on this occasion, « and who is there that does not see the weak"ness of the father's understanding; who but “ must acknowledge the pre-eminence of the “ daughter's ? I will speak yet plainer, most

incomparable Sappho, it is not fitting that

folly should prefcribe to wisdom : The ques« tion therefore is come to an upshot, Shall

Sappho live a life she despises and detefts, to “humour a father, whose weakness the pities, " but whose judgment the cannot respect ?” “ No," replied Sappho, “ that point is de

" cided;

“cided; pass on to the next, and speak to me

upon the practicability of executing what I am resolved to attempt.”

“ The authority “ of a parent,” resumed Mufidorus, “is such “over an unprotected child, that reason will “ be no defence to you against obstinacy and « coercion. In the case of a son, profession “ gives that defence; new duties are imposed by “a man's vocation, which superfede what are “ called natural ones; but in the instance of a “ daughter, where shall she fly for protection “ against the imperious controul of a parent, « but to the arms ? I tremble to pronounce “ the word; your own imagination must coma

plete the sentence”-“Oh! horrible!” cried Sappho, interrupting him, “ I will never marry; “I will never fo contaminate the spotless luftre “ of my incorporeal purity: No, Musidorus, « noI'll bear my blushing honours still about “ me.-“ And fit you should,” cried MufidoFUS,

« what dæmon dare defile them? Perish “the man, that could intrude a sensual thought « within the sphere of fuch repelling virtue ! “ But marriage is a form; and forms are pure;

at least they may be such; there's no pollu« tion in a name ; and if a name will shelter

you, why should you fear to take it?"“I perceive," answered Sappho, “ that I am

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« in a very dangerous dilemma; since the very

expedient, which is to protect me from vio“ lence of one fort, exposes me to it under “ another shape too odious to mention.”. « And is there then,” said Mufidorus fighing, « is there no human being in your thoughts in « whom you can confide? Alas for me! if you « believe you have no friend who is not tainted “ with the impurities of his fex: And what is “ friendship? what, but the union of fouls ? « and are not fouls thus united already mar“ ried? For my part, I have long regarded our “pure and spiritualized connection in this light, « and I cannot foresee how any outward cere

mony is to alter that inherent delicacy of « sentiment, which is inseparable from my soul's "attachment to the soul of Sappho : If we are « determined to despise the world, we should also

despise the constructions of the world: If re“tirement is our choice, and the life and « habits of Clemens are not to be the life and « habits of Sappho, why should Mufidorus, “who is ready to facrifice every thing in her “defence, not be thought incapable of abusing “ her confidence, when he offers the protection « of his name? If a few words muttered over

us by a Scotch blacksmith will put all our « troubles to reft, why should we resort to

“ dangers

when

dangers and difficulties, when so easy a re“medy is before us ? - But why should I seek “ for arguments to allay your apprehensions,

you

have in me so natural a fecurity for my performance of the strictest ftipulations ?”

.And what is that security ?” she eagerly demanded. Mufidorus now drew back a few paces, and with the most folemn air and action, laying his hand upon his heart, replied, “ My “age, madam !"-" That's true," cried Sappho; and now the conversation took a new turn, in the courfe of which they agreed upon their plan of proceeding, settled their rendezvous for the next day, and Musidorus departed to prepare all things necessary for the security of their expedition.

N° LXXXII.

N° LXXXII.

Tange Chloën femel arrogantem.

(HORAT.)

“O Cupid, touch this rebel heart !”

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PON the day appointed, Sappho, with

her father's consent, set out in a hired post-chaise upon a pretended visit to a relation, who lived about twenty miles from town on the northern road : At the inn where she was to change horses, fhe dismissed her London postillion with a short note to her father, in which she told him the should write to him in two or three days time: Here she took post for the next stage upon the great road, where she was met by Mufidorus, and from thence they pressed forward with all possible expedition towards Gretna Green.

The mind of Sappho was visited with some compunctions by the way; but the eloquence of her companion, and the respectful delicacy of his behaviour, foon reconciled her conscience to the step she had taken: The reflections which passed in Mufidorus's breast, were not so eafily quieted : The anxiety of his thoughts, and the

fatigues

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