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with so limited a fidelity. Your surprisingly opposite to the severe eyes, your hands, your conversa- maxims of Christianity. And, tion, are for the public, and what notwithstanding our foolih mando you pretend to referve for ners, I am of opinion, that a them? Pardon me, my beautiful woman, determined to find her Sultana, (added the, embracing me) happiness in the love of her husI have all possible inclination to band, must give up the extravabelieve what you say, but you gant desire of being admired by would impose upon me impoflibi- the public; and that a husband lities. I know the amorous com who loves his wife, must deprive plexion of you infidels, I see you himselt of the reputation of being are ashamed of them, and I will a gallant at court. You see that I never mention them to you more*. suppose two persons very extraor

I found so much good sense and dinary; it is not, then, very furtruth in all the said, that I could prising such a union should be rare scarcely contradi&t her; and I own- in a country, where it is necessary, ed at first, that she had reasons to in order to be happy, to despise prefer the morals of the mussulmen the established maxims. to our ridiculous cuftoms which are

I am, &c.

* This conversation is mentioned in the letters lately published, as written iny Lady M-W-yM-.

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der such proceedings excufable; it appears hard to refuse them to and I hope I should have fenfe her, and he finds himself obliged enough not to think vice less to conform himself to the polite vicious because it was in fashion. manners of Europe; to fee, every

I efteem much the morals of the day, her hands a prey to every one Turks, an ignorant people, but who will take them; to hear her very polite, in my opinion. A display, to the whole world, the gallant convicted of having de- charms of her wit; to fhew her bauched a married woman, is look- neck in full day; to dress for balls ed upon by them with the fame and shows, to attract admirers, and horror as an abandoned woman by to listen to the idle fattery of a us ; he is fure never to make his thousand and a thousand fops. Can fortune ; and every one would be any man support his esteem for a ashamed to give a confiderable em creature fo public, or, at least, ployment to a man suspected of does not the lose much of her being guilty of fo enormous a merit ! crime. - What would they fay in I return to the Oriental maxims, that moral nation, were they to where the most beautiful women fee one of our anti-knight-errants, content themselves with limiting who are always in pursuit of ad. the power of their charms to him ventures to put innocent young who has a right to enjoy them; women in diffress, and to ruin the they have too much honour to wish honour of women of fashion ; who to make other men miserable, and regard beauty, youth, rank, and are too fincere not to own they virtue, but as so many spurs to in- think themselves capable of excite their defire to ruin, and who citing paffion. place all their glory' in appearing I remember a conversation I had artful seducers, forgetting that, with a lady of great quality at with all their care, they can never Conftantinople, the most amiable attain but to the fecond rank, the woman I ever knew in my life, devils having been long face in and for whom I had afterwards the poffeflion of the first!

most tender friendship ; she owned, I own, that onr barbarons man- ingenuously, to me, that she was ners are so well calculated for the content with her husband. What establishment of vice and misery libertines youChristian women are ! (which is inseparable from it) that (she faid ;) it is permitted you to they must have hearts and heads receive visits from as many men as infinitely above the common, to you please; and your laws permit enjoy the felicity of a marriage you, without limitation, the ufe fuch as I have described. Nature of wine," I assured her she was is fo weak, and so given to change, very much mifinformed; that it that it is difficult to support the was true we received visits, but beft , founded constancy; amidft those visits were full of form and those many diffipations that our ri- respect, and that it was a crime to diculous customs have rendered in- hear talk of love, or to love any evitable. A husband who loves other than our husbands. Your his wife, is in pain to see her take husbands are very good (said she, the liberties which fashion allows; laughing) to content themselves

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with fo limited a fidelity. Your surprisingly opposite to the severe eyes, your hands, your conversa- maxims of Christianity. And, tion, are for the public, and what notwithstanding our foolih mando you pretend to referve for ners, I am of opinion, that a them? Pardon me, my beautiful woman, determined to find her fultana, (added she, embracing me) happiness in the love of her hufI have all posible inclination to band, must give up the extravabelieve what you say, but you gant desire of being admired by would impofe upon me impossibi- the public; and that a husband lities. I know the amorous com who loves his wife, must deprive plexion of you infidels, I see you himself of the reputation of being are ashamed of them, and I will a gallant at court. You see that I never mention them to you more*. suppose two persons very extraor

I found so much good sense and dinary; it is not, then, very surtruth in all she said, that I could prifing such a union should be rare scarcely contradict her; and I own- in a country, where it is necessary, ed at first, that he had reasons to in order to be happy, to despife prefer the morals of the mussulmen the established maxims. to our ridiculous customs which are

I am, &c.

This conversation is mentioned in the letters lately published, as written by Lady M-y W-y Me.

Vol. VI.

POETRY

Huh-softly tread, and filence keep;
The wanton gods are all asleep ;
Let's break their darts and bows,

So in our turn

We'll make them mourn,

And give the world repose.
'Tis done : for scarce the goddess spoke,
But lo! their darts and bows are broke;
Their quivers hang in triumph high,
When thus the nymphs express their joy :

Our victory's great,

Our glory's compleat,
No longer shall we be alarm'd;

Then fing and rejoice,

With one heart and voice,
Fór Cupid at length is disarm’d.

Ye nymphs and ye swains,

Who dwell on these plains,
And have by fond passions been harm’d,

Secure of your hearts

Now laugh at his darts,
For Cupid at length is disarm’d.
Rouz'd with the noise, the god in wild affright
Awakes; but oh! what objects shock his fight!
His dreaded arms in fcatter'd fivers thrown;
- cruel goddess—but I fcorn to moan.
Revenge be mine-still one unbroken dart
Remains-He said, and lanc'd it thro' her heart.

Beware how you the god of love provoke ;
Ah! what avail a thousand arrows broke,

If one remains to waft

The dire heart-wounding shaft !
Ah! what avail a thoufand arrows broke
If one remains to waft the fatal stroke!

The ACCEPTABLE SACRIFICE:

A fragment of Menander, translated by Francis Fawks, M. A.

W!

HOE'ER approaches to the Lord of all,

And with his offerings defolates the stall;
Who brings an hundred bulls with garlands drest,
The purple mantle, or the golden veft,
Or ivory figures richly wrought around,
Or curious images with emeralds crown'd;
And hopes with these God's favour to obtaing!
His thoughts are foolish and his hopes are vain.
He, only he may truft his pray’rs will risc,
And heav'n accept his grateful facrifice,

Who leads beneficent a virtuous life,
Who wrongs no virgin, who corrupts no wife;
No robber he, no murderer of mankind,
No miser, servant to the fordid mind.
Dare to be just, my Pamphilus, disdain
The smallest tride for the greatest gain :
For God is nigh thee, and his purer fight
In acts of goodness only takes delight:
He feeds the labourer for his honest toil,
And heaps his substance as he turns the soil.
To him then humbly pay the rites divine,
And not in garments, but in goodness shine.
Guiltless of conscience thou may'it safely sleep,
Tho' thunder bellow thro' the boundless deep.

ANACREON, ODE XXXVI,

USY Rhetor, hence away

Dictate not to me, I pray ;
What care I for all your rules ?
Love and Bacchus hate the schools.
Teach me not, then, what to say,
Teach Anacreon to be gay :
Teach me not then how to think,
Teach Anacreon how to drink.

See the envious hand of time,
Robs Anacreon of his prime !
See the wrinkles knit my brow!
See the Gilver treffes flow!
Cease, then cease your pedant ftrain ;
Fit for philofophic brain.
Since, my friend, I'm growing grey,
I'll be merry whilft I may ;
Drink and revel it away:
Quickly boy nay faster pour;
Death, perhaps, is at the door:
Quick then
left I drink no more.

ROGERS.

HY M E N 10 ELI Z A.

By L- L
MADAM, before your feet I lay

This ode upon your wedding day,
The first indeed I ever made,
For writing odes is not my trade;

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