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241

No private lof
No partial

D BARD. An ELEGY.
I join us
And

WILLIAM SHENSTONE, E -
, how frowns the sky,
(s o'er the visto'd scene :

from restkefs graves do fily,
pit o'er the twilight green.
ful of their wonted home,
on dearest friends on earth,
: unseen they roam,

ent the place that gave them birth. The war I aid of Vefper's twinkling urn,

Directs my steps to yonder time-struck towy, There, as in short-liv'd paffion, oft I burn,

These melancholy musings thus I pour: Full many a flow'ret blushing to the sun,

That scents the sweetness of the eastern more,
Inglorious oft its little life does run,

Nor once the bosom of the fair adorn :
Or near the bubbling of some weeping Atream,

Oft its sequefter'd sweetnefs did it breathe,
Where the coy damsel sleeps in pleafing dream,

Or where the decent graves in briery order heave Poetic youths in many an unknown home,

Mufing in penfive wailings oft we find, Perhaps the thymy heath they faunt'ring roam,

Or court in wayward strains the Aeeting wind. The chilling blasts of icy winter's frost,

Too oft the virgin primrose nip severe,
And many a friend by envy's breath is loft,

Nor claims a tribute of a figh fincere.
How many Shakespears have there fiv'd alone,

And Drydens, thankless in their poorer day?
And many a pensive Gray we've seen, unknown,

Who to the world has still refus’d his lay. Haply, on Edgar's hallow'd lips, the fire

Of Dædal fancy might have charm’d the day : Haply, the sacred veh’mence of his lyre

Might chace the white-wing'd minutes falt away.

Yet

Yet still the breath of penury severe,

Ah! too untimely, nipt the tender shoot-
If such the first attempt, then much we fear

The product of our pains, “ The rip’ning fruit."
The widow'd blackbird oft is heard to moan

Her hapless confort's melancholy fate,
And many a helpless swain now droops forlorn

O'er the dusk lawn, and does this tale relate.
But still fome breast with generous ardour glows,

To guard fair science in this favour'd ifle,
Not all to poetry alike are foes,

But deign the grace of an applauding smile.
'Twas Shenstone's choice to raise with gentleft care

The* tender shoot of blooming fancy's tree,
To stamp a genuine mark on what was rare,

And bid each mufe-fir'd poet · dare be free."
How oft, as thro' + th’ Arcadian groves he ftray'd,

The glad’ning impulse did his soul inspire,
How oft reclining in the bow'ry shade,

Wake into extafy the muse's lyre !
Sweet moralift! the pride of Albion's coaft,

Fell a fad victim to tyrannic death ;
To Dodf-y, me, and to his country lost,

When SHENSTONE's tuneful lips refign’d their breath,
To thee, my Shenstone, gratitude shall pay

This duteous tribute of a figh fincere,
And, true to honour's never-venal lay,
These accents shall pursue thy sacred bier.
Worcestershire.

PHILANDER.

An O DE on St. Cæcilia's Day, adapted to the ancient British music,

viz. the falt-box, the Jews harp, the marrow-bones and cleavers, the hum-ftrum or hurdy-gurdy, co as it was performed on June 10, at Ranelagh. By Bonnel Thornton, Esq.

Cedite, Tibicines Itali, vos cedite, Galli;

Dico iterum vobis, cedite, Tibicines.
Cedite, Tibicines, vobis ter dico; quaterque
Jam vobis dico, cedite, Tibicines,

Alex. Heinsius.

* Witness his generosity to a poor shoemaker of Rowley, in that neighbourhood, whom he thought to have a great natural genius for poetry.

Translation

† His gardens.

R 2

The falt-box with clattering and clapping shall found,

The iron lyre
Buzzing twang with wav'ring wire,

With heavy hum
The sober hurdy-gurdy thrum,
And the merry merry marrow-bones ring round.

LAST GRAND CHORUS.
Such matchless strains Cæcilia knew,
When audience from their heav'nly sphere,

By harmony's strong pow'r, the drew,
Whilft lift'ning angels gladly stoop'd to hear,

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BOOKS published in the Year 1763.

The antiquities of Athens measured pleasures of the imagination. IA

and delineated, by James Stuart, such a case, monuments of antiquity F. R. S. and F. S. A. and Nicholas not only illustrate history, but reRevett, Architects and Painters. gulate tafte; and are capable of V. i.

affording the most essential helps in

the improvement of architecture, THERE is scarcely any object, painting, sculpture, and all the

which operates more powerfully arts which embellish life. on that curiosity, which is the Advantages of this kind were great incitement to knowledge, naturally expected from a work on than antiquities of every species. the antiquities of Athens; and, If some persons have followed this perhaps, no book, which had exItudy with too much minuteness, cited so much of the public exor, by an enthusiasm naturally, and pectation, has disappointed it fo fomewhat excuseably, growing out little. Monsieur le Roy's performof a favourite pursuit, have rated ance, though it preceded this work, antiquities above their juft value, did not at all pre-occupy its place. their weakness cannot attaint the The work of messieurs Stuart and good sense of others, nor derogate Revett is, in every respect, as orifrom the advantage of rational and ginal and informing, as if no other liberal enquiries. By the ftudy of on the subject had gone before it. antiquities, history is frequently Indeed, that which has preceded explained and confirmed, and some- it rather afforded new and powertimes corrected. facts and man ful reasons for the publication of ners are rendered more ciftinét, this. The numerous and importand their impression becomes infi ant mistakes, with which that book nitely stronger, and more lafting. is filled, both in the disquisitions This study becomes ftill more im- and designs, had rendered more portant, if the antiquities, which exact enquiries, and more accurate are the object of it, relate to a drawings, absolutely necessary. Benation not only distinguished for cause the name of Athens would its power and policy, but eminent have been imposing ; and its mofor its cultivation of the rational numents, thus represented, would powers, and its refinement on the have vitiated, instead of correct

The falt-box with clattering and clapping shall found,

The iron lyre
Buzzing twang with wav'ring wire,

With heavy hum
The sober hurdy-gurdy thrum,
And the merry merry marrow-bones ring round.

LAST GR AND CHORUS.
Such matchless strains Cæcilia knew,
When audience from their heav'nly sphere,

By harmony's strong pow'r, she drew,
Whilft lift'ning angels gladly stoop'd to hear,

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