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all our weak imitations, and, I tremely pathetic; 'tis true, I am think, has a much better claim to inclined to prefer the Italian, but our praise. For my part, I am perhaps I am partial. I am acnot ashamed to own, i took more guainted with a Greek lady, who pleasure in looking on the beau- lings better than Mrs. Robinson, teous Fatima, than the finest piece and is very well skilled in both, of sculpture could have given me. who gives the preference to the She told me the two girls at her Turkith. 'Tis certain they have feet were her daughters, though very fine natural voices; thele were the appeared too young to be their very agreeable. When the dance mother. Her fair maids were was over, four fair llaves came ranged below the , sofa, to the into the room, with silver censers number of twenty, and put me in in their hands, and perfumed the mind of the pictures of thic an- air with amber, aloes-wood, and cient nymphs. I did not think all other scents. After this, they nature could have furnished such a ferved me coffee upon their knees, scene of beauty.' She made them in the finest japan china, with foua sign to play and dance. Four of coups of silver gilt. The lovely them immediately begun to play Fatima entertained me, all this some soft airs on instruments, bea while, in the most polite agreetween a lute and a guitar, which able manner, calling me often they accompanied with their voices, Uzelle Sultanam, or the Beautiful while the others danced by turns. Sultana, and defiring my friendThis dance was very different ship with the best grace in the from what I had seen before. No- world, lamenting, that the could thing could be more artful, or pot entertain me in my own lanmoi e proper to raise certain ideas. guage. The tunes so soft!

When I took my leave, (wo tions fo languishing ! accom maids brought in a fine fiiver basket panied with pautes and dying of embroidered handkerchiefs ; he eyes! half-falling back, and then begged I would wear the richef recovering themielves in so artful for her fake, and gave the others • a manner, that I am very positive, to my woman and interpretess.the coldest and most rigid prude I retired, through the same cere. upon earth, could not have looked monies as before, and could not upon them without thinking of help thinking, I had been some time Something not to be spoke of. I in Mahomet's Paradise, so much I fuppose you may have read that was charmed with whail had seen. the Turks have no music, but I know not how the relation of it what is shocking to the ears; but appears to you.

I with it may this account is from those who give you part of my pleasure; for never heard any but what is played I would have my dear fifter share in the streets, and is just as reason- in all the diversions of, Your's &c. able, as if a foreigner should take Letter xxxiii. his ideas of English music, from

The first letter of the third the bladder and string, or the volume contains a Turkish love marrow-bones and cleavers.. I can letter, and will certainly be ac. asfure you, that the mufic is ex- ceptable.

Pera,

the ino

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angels, dressed perfectly rich, and to have essayed by a collection of almost covered with jewels. But the most exact features to form a they were hardly seen near the perfe& face. Add to all this, a fair Fatima (for that is her name) behaviour fo full of grace and so much her beauty effaced every sweetness, such easy motions with thing I have seen, nay, all that an air fo majestic, yet free from has been called lovely either in stiffness or affectation, that I am England or Germany. I must own, persuaded, could she be suddenly that I never saw any thing fo glo- transported upon the moft polite riously beautiful, nor can I recol- throne of Europe, no body would lect a face that would have been think her other than bom and bred taken notice of near her's. She to be a queen, though educated in stood up to receive me, faluting a country we call barbarous. To me, after their fashion, putting fay all in a word, our most celoher hand to her heartwith a brated English beauties would vasweetness full of majesty, that no nish near her, court breeding could ever giver She was dressed in a Caftan of She ordered cushions to be given gold brocade, fowered with filyes, me, and took care to place me in very well fitted to her shape, and the corner, which is the place of thewing to advantage the beauty of honour. I confess, though the her bofom, only Shaded by the Greek lady had before given me thin gauze of her thift. Her a great opinion of her beauty, I drawers were pale pink, her waistwas fo ftruck with admiration, coat green and filver, her flippers that I could not, for some time, white fattin finely embroidered speak to her, being wholly takes her lovely arms adorned with up in gazing. That surprising bracelets of diamonds, and her harmony of features! That charm- broad girdle fet round with diam ing result of the whole ! That ex- monds ; upon her head a vich act proportion of body! That Turkish handkerchief of pink and lovely bloom of complexion un- filver, her own fine black hair sullied by art! The unutterable hanging a great length, in various enchantment of her smile! tresses, and on the fide of her But her eyes! Large and black, head some bodkins of jewels. I with all the soft languishment of am afraid you will accuse me of the blue ! every turn of her face extravagance in this description. discovering some new grace. I think I have read somewhere,

After my first surprise was over, that women always speak in rapI endeavoured, by nicely examin- ture, when they speak of beauty, ing her face, to find out some im- and I cannot imagine why they perfection, without any fruit of fould not be allowed to do so. my fearch, but my being clearly I rather think it a virtue to be able convinced of the error of that vul- to admire without any mixture gar notion, that a face exactly of defire or envy. The graveft proportioned, and perfectly beay writers have spoke with

great tiful, would not be agreeable; warmth of fome celebrated picnature having done for her, with tures and ftatues. The workmanmore success, what Apelles is faid hip of heaven certainly excels

all

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all our weak imitations, and, I tremely pathetic; 'tis trtie, I an think, has a much better claim to inclined to prefer the Italian, but our praise. For my part, I am perhaps I am partial. I am acnot ashamed to own, I took more quainted with a Greek lady, who pleafure in looking on the beau- ungs better than Mrs. Robinson, teous Fatina, than the finest piece and is very well skilled in both, of sculpture could have given me. who gives the preference to the She told me the two girls at her Turkish. 'Tis certain they have feet were her daughters, though very fine natural voices; these were the appeared too young to be their very agreeable. When the dance mother. Her fair maids were was over, four fair slaves came ranged below the , sofa, to the into the room, with silver censers number of twenty, and put me in in their hands, and perfumed the mind of the pictures of the an

air with amber, aloes-wood, and cient nymphs.

I did not think all other scents. After this, they nature could have furnished such a ferved me coffee upon their knees, scene of beauty.' She made them in the finest japan china, with fou. a sign to play and dance. Four of coups of silver gilt. The lovely them immediately begun to play Fatima entertained me, all this some soft airs on instruments, be- while, in the most polite agreetween a lute and a guitar, which able manner, calling me often they accompanied with their voices, Uzelle Sultanam, or the Beautiful while the others danced by turns. Sultana, and defiring my friendThis dance was very different ship with the best grace

in the from what I had seen before. No world, lamenting that she could thing could be more artful, or not entertain me in my own lanmore proper to raise certain ideas. guage. The tunes so soft!

the mo

When I took my leave, two tions fo languishing !

maids brought in a fine filver basket panied with paufes and dying of embroidered handkerchiefs; she eyes! half-falling back, and then begged I would wear the richest recovering themselves in fo artful for her fake, and gave the others · a manner, that I am very positive, to my woman and interpretess.the coldest and most rigid prude I retired, through the same cereupon earth, could not have looked monies as before, and could not upon them without thinking of help thinking, I had been some time Something not to be spoke of. I in Mahomet’s Paradise, so much I suppose you may have read that was charmed with what I had seen. the Turks have no music, but I know not how the relation of it what is shocking to the cars; but appears to you. this account is from those who give you part of my pleasure; for never heard

any but what is played I would have my dear fifter fare in the streets, and is just as reason- in all the diversions of, Your's &c. able, as if a foreigner should take Letter xxxiii. his ideas of English music, from

The first letter of the third the bladder and string, or the volume contains a Turkish love marrow-bones and cleavers. I can letter, and will certainly be acassure you, that the music is ex- ceptable.

accom

I with it may

" Pera,

Pera, March 16, O.S. Iam to buy you a Greek slave. I extremely pleased, my dear lady, have got for you, as you desire, a that you have, at length, found a Turkith love-letter, which I have commission for me, that I can an- put into a little box, and ordered swer without disappointing your the captain of the Smyrniofe to deexpectations ; though I must tell liver it to you with this letter. you, that it is not so easy as per- The translation of it is literally as haps you think it; and that, if my follows: The first piece you should curiofity had not been more dili- pull out of the purse, is a little gent than any other stranger's has pearl, which is in Turkish called ever yet been, I must have answer- Ingi, and must be understood in ed you with an excuse, as, I was this mannet: forced to do, when you desired me

Ingi, | Sensin Uzellerin gingi
Pearl, | Faireft of the young.
Caremfil, Carempillen cararen yok
Clove, | Congi gulfum timarin yok

Benteny chok than serverim
Senin benden, haberin yok
You are as slender as this clove!

You are an unblown rose!
I have long loved you, and you have not known it!

Derdime derman bul
Jonquil, Have pity on my passion!
Kibát,

Birlerum fabat Jahat
Paper,

I faint every hour!
Ermus,

Ver bize bir umut

Give me some hope.
Jabung

Derdinden oldum zabun
Soap,

I am fick with love.
Chemur,

Oliyim fize umur
Coal,

May I die, and all my year's be yours!
Gul,

Ben aglarum fen gul
A rose, May you be pleased, and your forrows mine,
Hafir,

Oliim fana yazir
A ftraw,

your
To bo,

Ufiune bulunmaz pahu
Cloth,
Tartin, Sen ghel ben chekeim senin bargin
Cinamon,
Giro,

Eking ilen oldum ghira
A match, I burn, I burn ! my fame consumes me.
VOL. VI.

Sirmio

Pear,

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Nave.

be found. But my fortune is yours.

Donale turn aways your face.

Sirma;

Uzunu benden a
4. Gold-thread,
Satcby

Bazmazun tach
Hair,

| head!
Uzum,

Benim iki Guzum
Y? Grape,

1
My Eyes !

?
Til
VA
Gold-wire, I die come quickly.

And by way of postscript,
Beber,

Bize bir dogm haber
Pepper,

. You see this letter is all in verse, as imposible for one human crea. and I can assure you, there is as ture to be perfect matter of ten dif. much fancy thewn in the choice of ferent languages, as to have, in them, as in the most studied ex- perfect subjection, ten differenç pressions of our letters ; there be- kingdoms, or to fight against ten ing, I believe, a million of verses men at a time. I am afraid I shall deligned for this use. There is no at løft know none as I should do. colour, no flower, no weed, no I live in a place, that very well frụit, herb, pebble, or feather, represents the Tower of Babel ; that has not a verse belonging to in Pera they speak Turkish, Greek, it; and you may quarrel, reproach, Hebrew, Armenian, Arabic, Peror fend letters of passion, friend- fian, Russian, Sclayonian, Walathip, or civility, or even of news, chian, German, Dutch, French, without ever inking your fingers. English, Italian, Hungarian ; and

I fancy you are now wondering what is worse, there are ten of at my profound learning ; but alas, these languages spoken in my own dear' madam, I am almost fallen family. My grooms are Arabs, into the misfortune so common to my footmen French, English, and the ambitious ; while they are em, Germans ; my nurse an Armenian; ployed' on distant infignificant con- my., house maids Russians; half a quests abroad, a rebellion farts op dezen other servants Greeks; my at home: I am in great danger : fteward an Italian; my Janizaries of lofing my English. I find 'tis Turks; fo that I live in the pernot half so easy to me to write in petual hearing of this medley of it, as it was a twelvemonth ago. Tounds, which produces a very exI am forced to study forexpressions, atraordinary effect upon the people and must leave off all other lan that are born here ; for they learn guages, and try to learn my mo all these languages at the same ther tongue. --- Human under- time, and without knowing any of standing is as much limited as them well enough to write or read human power, or human ftrength. Xin it. There are very few men, The memory can retain but a cer women, or even children here, that tain number of images; and 'tis have not the same compass of words

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