The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, المجلد 2

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Dodo Press, 2008 - 356 من الصفحات
Alexander Pope (1688-1744) is regarded as the greatest English poet of the early eighteenth century, best known for his satirical verse and for his translation of Homer. Pope, who was born in London, was taught to read by his aunt and then sent to two surreptitious Catholic schools. He is the third most frequently quoted writer in the English language, after Shakespeare and Tennyson. Pope was a master of the heroic couplet. From early childhood he suffered numerous health problems, including Pott's disease (a form of tuberculosis affecting the spine) which deformed his body and stunted his growth. The Rape of the Lock is perhaps Pope's most popular poem. It is a mock-heroic epic, written to make fun of a high society quarrel between Arabella Fermor (the "Belinda" of the poem) and Lord Petre, who had snipped a lock of hair from her head without her permission. Among his other works are: An Essay on Criticism (1711), Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady (1717), and Essay on Man (1734).

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نبذة عن المؤلف (2008)

Satirical poet Alexander Pope was born in London on May 21, 1688. He was educated by private tutors. Many consider Pope to be the greatest poet of his time, and he also wrote commentaries and translations, he is best known for such poems as The Rape of the Lock and The Duncaid. Pope was the first English poet to make a substantial amount of money from his writing. Pope died on May 30, 1744.

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