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sun - ny hours, And a dream of his youth, bring him flowers, fresh flow’rs.
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- o •–F–H LTL *–E ==E ==E *E=EH ==E=E=EH2E= : ke : Bring flowers, fresh flow’rs, for the bride to wear! For this in the woods was the violet nurs'd. They were born to blush in her shining hair, Though they smile in vain, for what once was ours, She is leaving the home of her childhood's mirth, They are love's last gift: bring ye flow’rs, pale flow’rs. She hath bid farewell to her father's hearth; Her place is now by another's side, Bring flowers to the shrine where we kneel in prayer, Bring flowers for the locks of the fair young bride. They are nature's offering, their place is there! . They speak of hope to the sainting heart, Bring flowers, pale flow’rs o'er the bier to shed, With a voice of promise they come and part, A crown for the brow of the early dead! They sleep in dust through the wintry hours, For this through its leaves hath the wild rose burst, They break forth in glory: bring flow'rs, bright flow’rs.

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“THE wages of every noble work do lie in heaven, or nowhere,” says Carlisle, in his quaint manner. There is holy truth in the sentiment. To the heart of woman this suggestion is most comforting. Our work cannot, in the nature of things, gain that consequence in the history of the world which belongs to the doings of men; but in heaven the balance can be adjusted, the two mites of the poor widow shown to have wrought more good, actually done, more for the advancement of true charity in the world, than all the “rich gifts” of ostentalion, pride, and selfishness. It is not uncommon to hear young ladies repine that there are so sew opportunities for them to engage in any “noble work.” But, while those the Saviour blessed— “little children”—are naturally the charge of woman, she should not complain that the field is not “noble.” She is training immortal spirits, and has the angels for her assistants. We rejoice that the station of instructress is constantly gaining, in importance and respectability, on the public inind. As a consequence of this increasing employment of female teachers, the Seminaries, which prepare them for their duties, acquire a greater importance. In many of the States, particular denominations have become convinced of the necessity of engaging the talents and influence of educated women in the great work of moral and intellectual improvement. The zeal of the Catholics in securing to those of their own faith the instruction of all the children they can obtain, is well known. It is in vain that Protestants reason or protest against this system. The only way to counteract it is to establish Protestant Seminaries of a higher character, and provide such resources that young girls of moderate means—those who would gladly become governesses in private families or teachers of common schools, if they could be qualified —may enjoy the advantages. The expenses of female education are, in too many of our private seminaries, most onerous and extravagant, compared with the advantages afforded. We are glad to find that Episcopal clergymen of high standing are taking an active interest in this subject. The bishops of Tennessee and Maryland are devoting themselves with much zeal and judgment to the promotion of female education in their respective dioceses. We hope shortly to have the opportunity of describing particularly the institutions under their fostering care, and also others worthy of note. At present, however, we shall confine our remarks to a seminary under the care of the Baptists. The school—known as “the New-Hampton Female Seminary"—is in New Hampshire, and, as if to correspond with its place and name, has a neur feature in its arrangement which might most beneficially be adopted into other seminaries. It is this.--About ten years ago, the young ladies, members of the seminary, (or rather those who chose to associate thus,) formed themselves into a “Literary and Missionary Association,” for the purpose of mutual improvement in intellectual pursuits, in the promotion of education and the missionary spirit among their own sex generally. This society of young ladies, while at the seminary, meets three times in every month in its literary, and once in its missionary capacity. At these meetings, discussions on various subjects, before assigned to particular members, are carried on, or dissertations read, &c. After leaving school, each member is expected to communicate once at least during the year with the Corresponding

Secretary, and thus the membership and the interest are to be continued through life. This society, by the Report before us, now numbers nearly six hundred members, including the honorary, scattered over our whole country, with not a few in various missionary stations in India, Africa, and among the Indian tribes of our own continent. The funds collected from initiation fees, annual subscriptions, &c., except what is necessary for the expenses of the society, are devoted to the aid of missions or to the education of young females who possess talents and inclination for the teacher's office, but have not the means of obtaining the requisite qualifications. The Report consists chiefly of extracts from the letters of the scattered members—by which we find that “to teach the young idea,” &c. is to them a really “delightful task” —or portions of such papers as the officers of the seminary and society have promulgated for the instruction and encouragement of their pupils. These letters and papers possess deep interest. They show a healthy tone of sentiment—not the effervescent glow which genius imparts to feeling only, but the steady light of moral principle and rational efforts in the cause of female improvement. The subject of duties—not rights—is urged on the young. We will make room for a few specimens of these extracts; and first, of their Missionary spirit. “We as a Society are pledged, and we cannot go back. We have already educated those who are on heathen ground, and have promised them our sympathies, our prayers, and our pecuniary aid. Who of us do not love the Burman mission? Who would not promote its interests? Who does not pray for the salvation of the Siamese, and for the success of our representative in this field of influence? “Providence threw the Burman mission upon the patronage of the Baptists while yet they had hardly thought of their duties to the distant heathen. The older mem. bers of our church remember well when the beloved Judson aroused their sympathies. Yes: it is only a few years since the American Baptists resolved to support a mission in Burmah. But oh! how much will these few years tell upon the eternal destiny of millions yet unborn. The gospel has been planted in the land of Gaudama. The precious Bible, in a known tongue, is diffusing its holy influence:–slowly it may be, but it will continue to be diffused till every temple, pagoda, hill and jungle shall be vocal with the praise of the Most High.” * + * * * + * * Here is a specimen of the intellectual and moral lessons given to the pupils:– “Young Ladies, fearlessly make every possible acquisition, not withstanding “Uncle Peter's 'hints to his niece “Celia.” The only point we are to guard is, not to give the incredulous occasion to find fault with our common, every-day life. Understand theoretically, and practically too, the entire cook-book; show a warm heart to every generous friend, though wanting in the finish of refined society; visit the poor and sick in their need, and reclaim the wanderer to the path of virtue and happiness. Not only act as trell in all the relations of life as those destitute of intellectual and moral training, but demonstrate, as is the fact, that those of mental discipline have great vantage ground over the uncultivated, even in the common acts of life. “There is not a branch of study, properly pursued, but may have a beneficial effect upon a lady's education: yes, if you will, that will not assist her in making "puddings

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and pies.” Whatever increases the perception and strengthens the reason, certainly conduces to this end. No, you must become skilled in the arts of housewifery; but you must not forget the expansion of the intellect and the cultivation of the heart. People must sit at a table crowned with the bounties of nature; but the mistress, if she would elevate existence above simple physical pleasure, must be so skilled in the arts of conversation—she must have such a fund of knowledge, and such cultivated perceptions, that she can make the scene at table one of seeming social enjoyment.” And here are a few words to the future mothers which this Seminary is training: “What wonders a few years will accomplish in the history of a girl in her teens! How many of our number who, a little time since, were gay, ambitious school girls, are now dignified matrons— mistresses of a little world of their own—a little garden, whose opening buds and fragrant blossoms are entirely dependent on their jealous

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This month, like many preceding ones, is barren in books and fertile in pamphlets. Among the former we have from Messrs. Desilver & Muir, of this city, “The Freemason's Monitor,” a manual for the freemason, and a very curious and interesting book for all who feel an interest in the history of that ancient fraternity which claims King Solomon for one of its members. It is beautifully printed and richly embellished, its most attractive feature to us being an admirable likeness of our friend J. R. Chandler, Esq., who, it appears, enjoys a very elevated rank among the masons. Another book, an actual bound book, a rarity in these times of cheap literature, comes from Messrs Case, Tiffany & Burnham, of Hartford. It is entitled “Harp of the Vale, or Collection of Poems. By Payne Kenyon Kilburn.” It consists chiefly of fugitive pieces which have already appeared in periodicals and newspapers, and are now first collected. These poems possess a great deal of merit, and are very properly rescued by the author from the oblivion which generally swallows up the fugitive poetry of newspapers. The Harpers send us “Alison's History of Europe,” No. 11; “Family Library, No. 8, comprising a History of Insects;” the “Works of Hannah More,” No. 2; “Shakspeare's Works,” No. 3; and “Brande's Cyclopædia,” No. 11. Messrs. Carey & Hart have brought down their “Farmer's Encyclopædia,” to No. 11, which completes the article on the Horse, and contains an interesting and useful article under the head of “ Kitchen Garden.” Their complete edition of Byron, with notes and plates, has reached the 6th number. This is the best edition of Byron's poetical works. Messrs. Lea & Blanchard have issued in the cheap form a new edition of the “Remains of Margaret Miller Datidson,” revised. With its merits our readers are well acquainted. The edition is on fine paper, beautifully printed. The same firm have published a pamphlet, entitled “Numerous cases of Surgical Operations without pain, in the Mesmeric state. By Dr. Elliotson,” which will attract great attention, from the nature of the subject. Messrs. Burgess & James, of Charleston, S. C., have published “Donna Florida,” a Tale, by the author of “Atalantis,” “Southern Passages and Pictures,” &c. It is a production chiefly of the author's younger days. It is written in the measure of Don Juan, without the licentious spirit which disfigures that poem. It will, we think, do no discredit to the author's previous reputation. Mr. William H. Graham, of this city, has commenced, in the serial form, the publication of the “Prose Romances of Edgar A. Poe.” The reputation of this author is de

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care. Did I not know that “circumstances mould the character,' I should tremble for the genus of innorlality committed to the seeming inexperienced and unprepared. To have in keeping so priceless a jewel; to determine, in an important sense, its temporal and eternal destiny, is no small trust. Ah! mother, when you first pressed that cherished one to your bosom did you pray for wisdom to bring up the intrusted charge in the “nurture and admonition of the Lord?' and as soon as it could appreciate the voice of prayer, did you in the secret chamber invoke the presence of the ‘Great Spirit” to direct all its ways? The smile of infancy is lovely,–'tis the smile of innocence. Its music is the sweetest that human voice can utter—'tis the music dictated by a happy heart. To preserre that sweet smile of innocence, those notes of happiness, should be the constant study of the deroted mother.” Is it not desirable that a society of a similar character were formed in every female seminary of our land?

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servedly high for originality, independence, a perfect command of the English language, and a certain easy and assured mastery of every subject which he handles. The first number contains the “Murders in the Rue Morgue,” and the “Man that was used up,” stories in totally disferent styles, showing versatility of power, but affording only a glimpse of the rich resources of his invention.

Mir. Colon sends us Croly’s “Salathiel,” one of the most powerfully written novels of modern times. The impression it makes never leaves an imaginative mind. The Wandering Jew, who is the hero of this story, takes precedence of all others bearing his name. Mr. Colon also sends us in continuation, the “Lowell Offering,” the “Unirersity Magazine,” and “Scenes in Indian Life,” and a pamphlet on “Pathetism,” published by Mr. Good, who advertises the “Pillar of Divine Truth,” a commentary on the scriptures, which ought to have been reprinted in this country long ago. Mr. Colon also sends a pamphlet, entitled “Miller orerthrown, or the False Prophet Confounded,” which may have the effect of tranquillizing soune perturbed spirits. We prefer, however, for our own reading, his cheap edition of “Bianca Capello.”

Professor Frost's “Pictorial History of the United States” for this month contains the usual number of splendid embellishments. It carries forward the colonial history of New England and New York to the beginning of the French war, which terminated in the conquest of Canada, a contest which was carried in every quarter of the world, and occupied most of the civilized nations, and which apparently from the want of any more suitable designation, is called the “Seven Years' War.” The fifth number of “The American Naral Biography” appears simultaneously with the sixth of the Pictorial History. It contains several interesting notices of distinguished naval commanders and is richly embellished with engravings.

“Tales and Sketches, translated from the Italian, French and German. By Nathaniel Greene, Boston. Little & Brown. Mr. Greene has selected some of the most pleasing compositions in the principal European tongues, and has rendered them into clear, flowing, idiomatic English, thus making a little volume of very agreeable reading. Apart from the interest of the stories, it is pleasant to observe the differences of national character, so apparent in the contrasted styles of the different tales. “The Artist’s Excursion,” “Il Sasso Rancio,” and “Poor Margaret,” show the sources from which they were drawn, not so much by the countries in which their scenes are laid, as by the peculiar traits of character and modes of thinking displayed in each.

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Messrs. Zieber & Co., of this city, have published “Marmaduke Wyrill, or the Maid's Rerenge, a Historical Romance. By Henry William Herbert, author of “The Brothers.” Cromwell,’ ” &c. &c. The period chosen for this delightful romance is that of the civil wars in England, with which the accomplished author has already shown his intinuate acquaintance in his well known and highly appreciated novel, Cromwell. No period of English history is more interesting or requires greater ability in the writer to handle; but Mr. Herbert has shown himself fully equal to the task, and has produced a work which will fully sustain his well-earned reputation. It is published in the fashionable cheap form. Such novels used to cost two dollars, and were considered cheap enough at that. “The Nassau Monthly "is the title of a neat looking periodical, conducted by the students of Princeton (N.J.) College. It is very well sustained, and reflects much credit on the talents and taste of the young gentlemen.” “Ninth Annual Report of the Young Ladies' Literary and Missionary Association of the New-Hampton Female Seminary,” printed at Concord, N. H. By Asa M“Farland. We have alluded to this in our Editor's Table. New York Mirror.—It is with great pleasure that we state that Gen. Morris has been completely successful with his new work. How could he fail—a host himself— and then Willis, where can his equal be found? He certainly is the pleasantest writer of the day.

--> DESCRIPTION OF FASHIONS. prlo MENA DE Drtess.

Fig. 1.-Composed of rich moire, shaded lavender and pink; the skirt trimmed with an enormous broad flounce, reaching higher than the knee, the edge of this flounce bordered with a narrow fulling of the same; tight body and sleeves; pelerine cape of the same, gathered and caught with a band over the shoulders. A small square collar surrounds the neck, which is bordered as well as the cape, with a narrow puffing to that on the flounce. Capote of rice straw, the interior and exterior trimmed with rows of narrow quilling tulle, a small branch of roses decorating the left side of the capote.

Fig. 2–A dress of striped Pekin silk; the skirt very full, and trimmed round with the two broad folds on the biais, placed close to each other; corsage pointed, and made high up to the throat, where it is simply trimmed with a narrow lace; this corsage is made on the cross way of the stuff, the stripes forming points in the centre; tight sleeves a biais, with lace ruffles. Scarf of rich lilac moire, the ends decorated with a broad netted fringe. Transparent bonnet of white crepe, the edge of the brim, both in the interior and exterior, finished with a narrow quilling of tulle; the crown decorated with a very light drooping pale pink flower, the exterior with small sprigs of pink daisies.

CHIT CHAT ABOUT FASHIONS.

Mantillas.-We have great pleasure in announcing the return of this truly elegant appendage to a lady's promenade dress; they may now be seen composed of India muslin, and lined with a pink or blue transparent material; others are made in tulle, and surrounded with lace; but the most elegant are those which are entirely composed of lace, allowing the entire figure to be seen.

A Royal Bride's Dress —The ladies will probably be interested in the following description of the weddingdress of the Princess Augusta. “The royal bride's dress was of a very handsome Brussels point lace over white satin louped on each shoulder with bouquets of orangeblossom diamonds, and sapphires, and very elegantly ornamented in front with a border of orange-blossoms and silver; the train (of Spitalfields manufacture) was of the richest white satin and silver tissue, and was most tastefully trimmed down the sides and at the bottom with festoons of orange flowers, finished with a raised border of silver. It had an edging of deep point lace, having the orange flower in the pallern. The Princess wore on her

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head a wreath composed of orange flowers and myrtle, and a tiara of sapphires and diamonds, and was covered with a very large and most beautiful veil of point lace, remarkable alike for its size and elegance of design. Her royal highness wore a necklace of brilliants. The stomacher was of sapphires and diamonds, and ear-rings en suite.” We subjoin some account of the christening of the young Princess Alice Maud Mary, youngest child of the Queen of England, and of the dresses worn upon the occasion:— The altar of the chapel was decorated with some very fine specimens of gold communion plate, and was covered with crimson velvet, richly trimmed and ornamented with deep gold lace. Her majesty wore her magnificent diamond diadem, with diamond necklace and ear-rings, and the riband, star, and armlet of the most noble Order of the Garter. Prince Albert wore his uniform as Field Marshal, with the collars and stars of the Orders of the Garier, the Thistle, and the Bath. The font, of silver gilt, was the same that was used at the christening of the Princess Royal. It was placed on a pedestal in front of the altar, and was filled with water brought from the river Jordan. A very large painting was hung at the back of the altar. The dress of the infant Princess was a robe of Honiton lace over white silk, made at Spitalfields, and cap to correspond. The whole dress of British manufacture. The toilettes were all remarkably simple, but exquisite in form; and, from their simplicity, more effective. There was nothing striking but the diamonds. Her Majesty's toilette consisted of a white watered silk, with a magnificent flounce of lace, which certainly did honour to the Honiton manufacture. Her Majesty the Queen Dowager wore a dress of rich white satin, simply and elegantly trimmed with several flounces of blonde, and a head-dress of tulle, with white feathers. The Duchess of Kent wore a dress of white lace over one of white satin, and a dress hat with feathers. Coloured Rose and Butterfly.—We give this month a coloured rose and butterfly, which has been some time in progress. Our city edition for July, contained the same rose, uncoloured. A contemporary published something similar in August. We now give the real thing, and whether it cost little or much, we pronounce it far superior to any effort of the kind either in this or any other country. It plainly shows what can be done by an old established house, and must certainly, in future, prevent any attempts to compete with us. We are proud to add that the drawing is by an American artist, and the colouring by an American lady. Those of our city subscribers, who received an uncoloured rose on the back of the July Fashions, can now colour it after the one in the present number—that is, if their tastes so incline them. In our picture of the Fair Artist, may be seen alikeness of the great painter, Wandyke. It will be seen that we have four embellishments in this number. THE FAIR ARTIST, with a Portrait of Vandyke. SIR ROGER DE COVERLEY. A fine engraving. The painting by Leslie. ROSE AND BUTTERFLY, which far surpasses any colouring ever done in this country for a periodical. We ask a comparison between this and any other coloured flower. * TWO FIGURES OF FASHIONS. The latest. We promised in our last that the September number should be the richest in point of illustration that we have issued for some time, and we have kept our word. Our engravings illustrative of Old Fashions, not being quite ready, we are forced to postpone publication until next number. An article in this number upon Lady Morgan's writings, is by a new correspondent—a lady well known in this city, but who declines giving her name. It is a forcible and well written review. The next number will contain a Review of the Works of Mrs. Ellis.

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