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Nor was this distrust entirely without some appearance of foundation. It is certain that the king entertained good hopes of him, and to that purpose wrote to him from Colen on the twelfth of August, 1655: However, the general made no fcruple of discovering every hep taken by the Cavaliers which came to his knowledge, even to the sending the protector this letter, and joined in promoting addresses to him from the army in Scotland ; one of which was most graciously received by the protedor on the nineteenth of March, 1657; and the same year he received a fummons to Oliver's houle of lords,

About this time George, second son of general Monk died in his infancy, which was a great affliction to his father, who was doatingly fond of him. From this period, to the death of Oliver, the general maintained Scotland in sub. jection, and lived free from all disturbance, not intermeddling further with the mad politicks of those times, than to put what orders he received from England punctually into execu

in pursuance of which plan he proclaimed Richard Cromwell protector there after his father's death, Richard having difpatched Dr. (afterwards Sir Thomas) Clarges then commissioner of the Scotch and Iris forces, whose fifter the general had some time before owned for his wife, with letters to him ; to which he returned a suitable and respect. ful, answer, aiming only at fecuring his own command; as the lame time joining with the

tion ;

more absolute than any of their princes had dared to practise.

The war in Scotland being put an end to thus speedily and happily for the protector, he appointed a council of fate for that part of bis government; consisting of the lord Broghill; general Monk; colonel Haward, created earl of Carlisle after the restoration; coIonel William Lockhart ; colonel Adrian Scroop; colonel John Whetham ; and majorgeneral Defoorough; who came to Scotland in September, 1655, and began to exercise their authority, which was very extensive.

The majority of these commiffioners (three of whom, lord Broghill, colonel Howard, and colonel Whetham, were afterwards very inftrumental in the restoration) concurred with general Monk in almost every thing he proposed; by which means the government of Scotland fill remained chiefly in his hands; which, together with his affable behaviour towards the better fort of all parties, made Cromwell begin to entertain fome fufpicions of him ; and, in order to prevent his influence from growing too powerful, the protector ofed to make frequent changes in the forces under his command, by recalting such regiments as were most trufted by the general, and fending in their room thofe who were most violent and refractory at home; who gave him much trouble to bring them into order, and make them fubmit to that discipline which he obliged all under him strictly to observe.

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Nor was chis distrust entirely without some appearance of foundation. It is certain that the king entertained good hopes of him, and to that purpose wrote to him from Colen on the twelfth of August, 1655: However, the general made no fcruple of discovering every step taken by the Cavaliers which came to his knowledge, even to the sending the protector this letter, and joined in promoting addresses to him from the army in Scotland ; one of which was most graciously received by the prote&or on the nineteenth of March, 1657; and the same

year

he received a fummons to Oli. ver's house of lords,

About this time George, second son of general Monk died in his infancy, which was a great affliction to his father, who was doatingly fond of him. From this period, to the death of Oliver, the general maintained Scotland in fub. jection, and lived free from all disturbance, not intermeddling further with the mad politicks of those times, than to put what orders he received from England punctually into execution ; in pursuance of which plan he proclaimed Richard Cromwell protector there after his father's death, Richard having difpatched Dr. (afterwards Sir Thomas) Clarges then commissioner of the Scotch and Iris forces, whose fifter the general had some time before owned for his wife, with letters to him ; to which he returned a suitable and respect. ful, answer, aiming only at fecuring his own command; at the fame time joining with the

rest of the officers and army under his command, in an address to the new protector, whose power he might easily forelee would have but a short date, it having been his opinion that Oliver, had he lived much longer, would scarce have been able to preserve himfelfin his station. And indeed Cromwell be.. gan to be apprehensive of that great alterarion which happened in the government, and fearful that the general was deeply engaged in those measures which procured it; if we may judge from a letter wrote by him to general Monk but a little before his death, to which was added the following remarkable postfcript:

"There be that tell me, that there is a certain cunning fellow in Scotland, called George Monk, who is faid to lie in wait there to introduce. Charles Stuart. I pray you to use your diligence to apprehend him and send him to me.”

However, as Clarges had informed him, by Richard's order, that his late father had exprefly charged him to do nothing without his advice, the general recommended to him to encourage a learned, pious, moderate mi niftry in the church ; to permit no councils of officers, a liberty they had too often abused; to call a parliament, and to endeavour to be master of the army.

It is well known a parliament was called by Richard Cromwell; and, also, that, by the divisions arising in the upper-house there

of,

of, which spread their influence over the army, hie was soon obliged to dissolve it.

The general receiving advice of these transactions, and of the depositions of Ri. chard, readily abandoned him he had so lately proclaimed ; and his brother in law being again sent to him from the rump-parliament, on their restoration, he acquiesced in all they bad done, as the surest way to preserve his own command, only by recommending Richard to their favour; and, with his officers, signed the engagement against Charles Stuart, or any other single person, being admitted to the government. But, when their committee, consisting of ten persons, began, on the information of Peirson and Mason, two republican colonels in his army, to make considerable al. terations therein, by cashiering of those officers in whom he most confided'; of which his brother-in-law, Clarges, gave him informa. tion; he wrote a letter to the house, complaining of this treatment in fo warm a stile, at the fame time engaging for the fidelity of his officers, that they ordered their committee not to proceed further therein till the general him. self was consulted.

The Royalists were far from being idle in this juncture; there had been a kind of fe. cret committee of that party, for managing affairs in behalf of the crown, ever fince the death of Charles I. among whom was the son of Sir John Greenvile, our general's kinsman,

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