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will offer to France, and such as they both conclude will secure Flanders. They both agree,that 1 mult of neceffity go to Paris immediately upon this errand, and bring a positive answer from that court within a time prefixed. I never undertook any journey more unwillingly, knowing in what opinion i stand already at that court; how deeply they resent the prince's match without their communication, or the least word to their ambassador here; and with how little reason I can hope to be the welcomer for this errand. But the king will absolutely have it; and so I have made all my small preparations, and think to be

gone

within two days; which is all at present, but to ask your blessing, and assure you of my being,

SIR,

Your, &c.

"To the Prince of Orange.

London, December 8. 1677. May it please your Highness,

I SHOULD, by last post, have rejoiced with your highness upon the news of your happy arrival, and upon the resolutions that have been taken here since you went, in those affairs wherein your highness is so deeply concerned; but that my lord-treasurer's letter to you upon

in no

this subject, was so long and so particular, that
nothing could be added to it for your high-
'ness's information or fatisfaction: and there-
fore I resolved not to trouble you with the
same thing by that post, and from so much a
worse hand. I suppose' my lord-ambassador
Hyde will have shewed your highness his in-
ftructions, and Mr. secretary's letter upon that
occasion, which agreeing so fully with what
my lord-treasurer writ, must have left you
doubt of those resolutions being taken here :
and yet I thought your highness would not be
displeased to know from me, that I am of
opinion they are so; and, which is more, that
the duke will go up to as great a height-in
them as any man, in case France gives them
the occasion, by their answer to what Mr.
Mountague goes away with to day; and that
his highness will absolutely conclude from
thence, what their good intentions are or'have
been to the king.

Though I have this second time excused myself from attending upon your highness, and thereby devolved his majesty's commands upon Mr. Hyde once more, yet, I hope, your highnefs will pardon me, since I have only reserved myself for the next occasion, which, I expect, will be of more moment, and within a very little time. For the present, I only desire your highness will pieale to give your answer to what Mr. Hyde carries you, in such manner as may be fully to his majesty's fatisfaction i and if you should scruple the doing it to any

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will offer to France, and such as they both conclude will secure Flanders. They both agree, that I must of necessity go to Paris immediately upon this errand, and bring a positive answer from that court within a time prefixed. I never undertook any journey more unwillingly, knowing in what opinion i stand already at that court; how deeply they resent the prince's match without their communication, or the least word to their ambassador here; and with how little reason I can hope to be the welcomer for this errand. But the king will absolutely have it; and so I have made all my

Small

preparations, and think to be gone within two days; which is all at present, but to ask your blefling, and assure you of my being,

SIR,

Your, &c.

"To the Prince of Orange.

London, December 8. 1677. May it please your Highness,

I SHOULD, by last post, have rejoiced with your highness upon the news of your happy arrival, and upon the resolutions that have been taken here since you went, in those affairs wherein your highness is so deeply concerned ; but i hat my lord-treasurer's letter to you upon

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this subject, was so long and so particular, that nothing could be added to it for your highness's information or satisfaction: and there. fore I resolved not to trouble you with the same thing by that post, and from so much a worfe hand. I suppose' my lord-ambassador Hyde will have shewed your highness his instructions, and Mr. fecretary's letter upon that occasion ; which agreeing so fully with what my lord-treafurer writ, must have left you in no doubt of those resolutions being taken here : and yet I thought your highness would not be displeased to know from me, that I am of opinion they are so; and, which is more, that the duke will go up to as great a height-in them as any man, in case France gives them the occasion, by their answer to what Mr. Mountague goes away with to day; and that his highness will absolutely conclude from thence, what their good intentions are or have been to the king.

Though I have this second time excused myself from attending upon your highness, and thereby devolved his majesty's commands upon Mr. Hyde once more, yet, I hope, your highnefs will pardon me, since I have only reserved myself for the next occafion, which, I expect, will be of niore moment, and within a very little time. For the present, I only desire your highness will pieale to give your answer to what Mr. Hyde carries you, in such manner as may be fully to his majesty's fatisfa&tion ; and if you should scruple the doing it to any

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other hand, that you would, at least, do it in a private letter to his majesty's own, which may not go farther than to those hands by which all your highness's concerns have been hitherto transacted.

I hope your highness will think to write particularly to the duke; as well as the king, in acknowledgment and applause of these late resolutions; and my lord-treasurer will deferve it too by the great part he has had in them.

I ask yoor highness's pardon for the length and confidence of this letter, and your justice in believing me ever what I shall ever be, with a perfect devotion,

SIR,

Your Highness's, &c.

After having performed all these services to the crown and kingdom, in the year 1679, Sir William Temple was again sollicited to enter upon the office of secretary of state, but he declined it upon account of the uncertain situation of affairs; at the same time advising the king to form a new council, of which he was appointed one; though afterwards, upon

the change of measures at court, and the freedom with which he delivered his opinion, his name was ftruck ove of the councilbook.

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