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This gave him occafion to send the king, word, That he would live the rest of his life as good a subject as any in his kingdoms, but. never meddle again with public affairs : А. refo!ution which he inviolably maintained, spending the remainder of his days at MoorPark, near Fárnham, in Surry, without having the least previous knowledge of the prince of Orange's expedition to England. in 1688; and refufing the earnest follications of that prince, when he was advanced to the throne, to engage him in his service, and to be secretary of ftate, though he was often consulted by him in kis most secret and important affairs. Indeed it is a common thing for men, who live in the fplendor and hurry of courts, sometimes ta wish for a retreat, where they may relieve themselves after the fatigue of state and businefs ; yet they seldom do retire but when they Know not how to stay any longer : so that the contempt of a court is, in many men, but a. contrivance of self-love to aleviate the morti.. fication of being excluded by undervaluing greatness and those that are in power. On the other hand, nothing is more difficult, to the generality of men, who have enjoyed the pomp and pleasures of a court, than to finish the remainder of their lives in privacy and retirement; for few perfons have so rich a fund in themselves, as to supply and fill up the great . chasms which the want of public business and diversion leaves on their minds : but Sir Wil.

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fiam Temple had the happiness to escape both these inconveniencies; and, as his retiring from business was in all appearance voluntary, fo his contempt of greatness and splendor was the result of a thorough knowledge of the emptirefs and vanity of thofe glaring objects. He was feasible, that there was little in a court but a perpetual exchange of false friendship, pretended honefty, seeming confidence, and defigning gratitude : so that those, who, as, Sir William, acted upon a sincere bottom, and gave realities in flead of thews, professed themfelves as great bubbles as such as gave good money when counterfeit coin passed for current payment.

He had, by long experience, made the estimate of the advantages of a private life above those of a public ; and was thoroughly convinced, That the blettings of innocence, fecurity, meditation, good air, health, and found sleep, were clearly preferable to the splendor of courts; considering the slavishaitendance, the invidious competitions, servile flattery, and the mortal disappointments that usually attend them. He fet the frowns of princes, the envy of those that judge by hearfay, and the innumerable temptations, vices, and exceffes' of a life of pomp and pleasure, in ballance against the smiles of bounteous nature, the diversion of healthful exercises for the body, and the solid and lasting entertainments of the mind; and concluded, That he

that

that is a flave in the town, is a kind of pellyprince in the country,

To be very particular in annalyzing his works, would be foreign to our purpose ; yet we must not omit mentioning his Memoirs, which have not been equalled by any that have writ fince him. They are the more useful. hecaufe they take in the principal parts of the reign of Charles II. and without them we. should have but an imperfect account of many particulars in that unegual adminiftration. The second part fipt first into the world, without the knowledge, as it was faid, though mott believe without the connivance, of the author.

They confist not only of many domestic affairs relating to the court of England, but of the principal foreign negotiations began in 1673, and ended in 1678, in the treaty of Nimeguen, and with the general peace of Europe ; all laid open with firmness and impartiality, as well as clearness and simplicity.

The first part was never published at all, but is very well supplied by a great number of letters and public papers ; which sufficiently fhews what a vigorous actor Sir William Temple was, how great a statesman he proved, and how much a master of business and poli.. ticks.

The third part appeared some years after his death; which, though complained of as being published without consent of relations, was never charged with being the least spurious. This, though shortest in compass, both

as

Jiam Temple had the happiness to escape both these inconveniencies; and, as his retiring from business was in all

appearance

voluntary, fo his contempt of greatness and splendor was the result of a thorough knowledge of the emptirefs and vanity of thofe glaring objects. He was sensible, that there was little in a court but a perpetual exchange of false friendship, pretended honefty, seeming confidence, and defigning gratitude : so that those, who, as Sir William, acted upon a sincere bottom, and gave realities instead of thews, professed them. felves as great bubbles as such as gave good money when counterfeit coin paffed for curreni payment,

He had, by long experience, made the estimate of the advantages of a private life above those of a public ; and was thoroughly convinced, That the blefiings of innocence, lecurity, meditation, good air, health, and found sleep, were clearly preferable to the splendor of courts; considering the flavish attendance, the invidious competitions, servile flattery, and the mortal disappointments that usually attend them. He fet the frowns of princes, the envy of those that judge by hearfay, and the innumerable temptations, vices, and excesses of a life of pomp and pleasure, in ballance against the smiles of bounteous nature, the diversion of healthful exercises for the body, and the solid and lasting entertainments of the mind; and concluded, That he

that

that is a flave in the town, is a kind of pettyprince in the country:

To be very particular in annalyzing his works, would be foreign to our purpose ; yet we must not omit mentioning his Memoirs, which have not beun equalled by any that have writ fince him.. They are the more useful. because they take in the principal parts of the reign of Charles Il. and without them we. should have but an imperfect account of many particulars in that unequal adminiftration. The fecond part slipt first into the world, without the knowledge, as it was faid, though molt believe without the connivance, of the author. They confist not only of many domeftic affairs relating to the court of England, but of the principal foreign negotiations began in 1673, and ended in 1678, in the treaty Nimeguen, and with the general peace of Europe ; all laid open with firmness and impartiality, as well as clearness and fimplicity.

The first part was never published at all, but is very well supplied by a great number of letters and public papers ; which sufficiently shews what a vigorous actor Sir William Temple was, how great a statesman he proved, and how much a master of business and poli.. ticks.

The third part appeared fome years after his death ; which, though complained of as being published without consent of relations, was never charged with being the least spuriQus. This, though shortest in compass, both

of

as

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