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the chief command, that, upon his return to his thip again, and the signal given, the whole fleet of English, Dutch, and Swedes readily failed under his command to Copenhagen, which they pretended to bombard a little, without scarce any damage done ; though we have been assured, by some intelligent persons present, they could have laid the city in ashes.

But the admiral's inftructions and defigns tended only to peace ; which beiąg soon after happily concluded at Travendall, Sir George returned home, about the middle of September, with the general applause of the people, for the great prudence and conduct he had fhewn in fo nice and ticklish a conjuncture.

In the spring of the year 1701, his majesty was pleased to constitute Sir George Rook to be admiral and commander in chief; but the war against France not breaking out, on this side of Europe, till next year, there was no naval enterprize yet undertaken by him. In the mean time, king James II. dying at St. Germains, and the French owning his pretended son for king of England, chafed the people of England to a high degree ; and his majesty, in this juncture of affairs, thinking fit to call a new parliament, Sir George Rook was again elected for Portsinouth; and the day of meeting, which was the thirtieth of Dec cember, being come, the commons were direded to go and chuse their speaker.

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about this grand affair. He went aboard again in a few days, and, being joined by the Dutch squadron under the command of lieutenant ad. miral Allemond, they were detained, for several days, on the Dutch coafts by contrary winds; however, they made a shift, before the end of June, to arrive at Gottenburg ; and, on the eighth of July, entered the Sound without any oppofition.

The English admiral faluted the castle of Cronenburg with three guns, and a like number was returned ; the Dutch admiral gave nine, and the castle fired three in return.

The whole fleet consisted of thirty men of war, besides fire-fhips, bomb-vessels, and tenders. The Swedish feet having, in like manner, put to sea, when they came to an anchor near one another, on the fifteenth, near Land. scroon, beyond the Isle of Vere (upon which the Danith fleet retired under the

guns

of the citadel of Copenhagen).

It is very remarkable, that, though the En. glish and Dutch squadrons came to assist and fave the Swedes from ruin, that the latter took no notice of them that evening, all the next day, and part of the morning of the seventeenth; when the English admiral, having wisely weighed matters, and pursuing his orders for precedency, commanded a signal to be made by a small Dutch frigate, as if the were a neutral ship, for all flags to come on board ; where he represented the case fo ef. fecțually to the Swedes, who expected to have

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the chief command, that, upon his return to his chip again, and the signal given, the whole fleet of English, Dutch, and Swedes readily failed under his command to Copenhagen, which; they pretended to bombard a little, without scarce any damage done ; though we have been assured, by some intell gent persons present, they could have laid the city in ashes.

But the admiral's inftructions and designs tended only to peace ; which beiąg soon after happily concluded at Travendall, Sir George returned home, about the middle of September, with the general applause of the people, for the great prudence and conduct he had shewn in so nice and ticklish a conjuncture,

In the spring of the year 1701, his majesty was pleased to constitute Sir George Rook to be admiral and commander in chief; but the war against France not breaking out, on this side of Europe, till next year, there was no naval enterprize yet undertaken by him. In the mean time, king James II. dying at St. Germains, and the French owning his pretended fon for king of England, chafed the people of England to a high degree ; and his majesty, in this juncture of affairs, thinking fit to call a new parliament, Sir George Rook was again elected for Portsinouth; and the day of meeting, which was the thirtieth of Dec cember, being come, the commons were di. Teated to go and chuse their speaker.

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ments upon it, a packet was brought in sealed and directed to his grace; upon opening of which there appeared a mask inclosed, but nothing written. The archbishop, without any signs of emotion, threw it carelesly among his papers on the table; and, on the gentleman's expressing great surprize and indignation at the affront, his grace only smiled, and said, That this was a gentle rebuke, if compared with fome others, that lay there in black and white, pointing to the papers on the table.

Nor could the series of ill treatment, which he received, ever provoke him to a temper of revenge, being far from indulging himself in any of those liberties, in speaking of others, which were, to fo immeasureable a degree, made use of against himself. And, upon a bundle of libels found among his

papers

after his death, he put no other inscription than this, “ These are libels. I pray God forgive them: I do."

The calumnies spread against him, though the falseft which malice could invent, and the confidence with which they were averred, joined with the envy that accompanies a high itation, had indeed a greater operation than could have been imagined, considering how long he had lived so public a scene, and how well he was known. It seemed a new and unusual a thing, that a man, who, in the course of above thirty years, had done fo much good, and so many services to so many per

fons,

fôns, without ever once doing an ill office, or a hard thing, to any one, and who had a sweetness and gentleness in him, that seemed rather to lean to an excess, should yet meet with so much unkindness and injustice. But he bore all this with a submission to the will of God; nor had it any effect on him, to change either his temper or his maxims, tho' Perhaps it might fink too much into him with relation to his health.

He was so exactly true, in all the representations of things or persons, which he laid before their majesties, that he never raised the character of his friends, nor sunk that of those who deserved not so well of him; but offered every thing to them with that fincerity which fo well became him. His truth and candour were perceptible in almost every thing which he said or did; his looks and whole manner seeming to take away all fufpicion concerning him ; for he thought nothing in this world was worth much art or great management.

He did not long survive his advancement ; for, on Sunday, the eighteenth of November, 1694, he was seized with a sudden illness while he was at the chapel in Whitehall: but, though his countenance shewed that he was in. disposed, he thought it not decent to interrupt the service. The fit indeed eame slowly on, but it seemed to be fatal, and soon turned to a dead pally. The oppreffion of his difemper was so great, that it became very un

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