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THE EDINBURGH LITERARY JOURNAL,

OR WEEKLY REGISTER OF CRITICISM AND BELLES LETTRES.

A FEW Copies of the First Volume of this Work

are still on Sale, price 15s. in boards.-The success which has attended the EDINBURGH LITERARY JOURNAL, since its commencement, has been quite unprecedented in the history of Scottish Periodicals; and the Proprietors are resolved to spare no expense or exertion to make it worthy of the patronage it has so liberally received. The highly flattering manner in which the JOURNAL has been already spoken of by many competent authorities may be judged of by the following passages, which are selected, almost at random, from a very great number of similar testimonials.

"From what I know of the Editor, a gentleman of talent, spirit, and perseverance, I foretel the book will prosper."-CHRISTOPHER NORTH, in Blackwood's Magazine for November, 1828.

"We have watched the progress of this able and enterprising periodical with no common interest. The Edinburgh Literary Journal has already become part and parcel of the existing system of our be

incorporated therein, as the Edinburgh Review or Blackwood's Magazine. Its success, indeed, has been quite extraordinary, and would be somewhat difficult to account for, did we not look to the array of distinguished names which appear in the list of its contributors, and to the singularly varied, spirited, and attractive articles, whether in the shape of reviews or original essays, which diversify and adorn its columns."-Caledonian Mercury.

"This periodical, which, from its commencement. has been conducted with a degree of literary ability and spirt unprecedented in any work of the same description, has, we rejoice to state, obtained a very large share of public patronage. This is a degree of popularity we never expected to see any weekly publication of the kind attain in this country; for though from the first we had the fullest reliance on the talents and industry of the Editor of the Journal, we considered it almost impossible for any man to retain for any length of time, so many able and distinguished contributors as he has done, and will, we confidently anticipate, continue to do."-Edinburgh Observer.

We thank our brother Editor of the Edinburgh Literary Journal for the passing notice which he has been pleased to take of our labours; and we can assure him that there are but few of our contemporaries for whose good opinion and talents we have so high a respect as for his."-Oxford Literary Gazette.

The highest compliment that we can offer to the conductors of this periodical, (and these embrace the greatest names known to our literature,) must go forth to them in the simple statement, that we value it for its research, its animation, and its variety, more than any other weekly brochure that comes to our office. We have nothing to do but open the Edinburgh Literary Journal, when we wish to select some piquant morsel for the entertainment of our own readers. In its reviews of historical books it is profound and philosophic. It treats scientific subjects with all the master's acumen, and seems familiar with every thing that is encompassed within the sweeter and brighter walks of the light departments of literature-those, particularly, that lead to the cultivation of poetry, the fine arts, and, indeed, the Belles Lettres generally. We have already made several extracts from this admirable Literary Journal, and at the earliest opportunity shall continue to turn it to account."-Dublin Freeman's Journal.

"We have had the pleasure of perusing, for nearly six months, the Edinburgh Literary Journal, and we have found it, in all respects, as good a work of the kind as can be expected, and almost as good as can be desired. * Now that we have before us the numbers of the Journal for the half year it has existed, and revive, by glancing over the various contents of the volume, our recollection of the great entertainment we have derived from its perusal, week by week, we feel still more strongly impressed with a sense of its paramount claim to public patronage. Its original matter, contributed by many popular Scottish writers, is of a very superior quality, whether in the grave or gay, the lively or severe style; its reviews and criticisms are judicious, and, we believe, impartial; and the scraps and passages of news of letters and the arts which it collects, are written with spirit, or selected with good judgment. We need not here make any selection from the volume, as no week passes in which we do not present to our readers one or more extracts, which we acknowledge we owe to the Journal."-Liverpool Saturday Advertiser.

"We suppose that many of our readers are natives of the north countree. To such we should recommend the Edinburgh Literary Journal, a weekly Register of Criticism and Belles Lettres, to which the greater number of distinguished Scottish writers are regular contributors."-The Spirit and Manners of the Age.

For various kinds of work, the Editor is a host within himself; his range, in fact, includes the wide extremes of a song and a sermon,' and we may truly say of him in the words of the proverb, that ⚫ nothing seems to come wrong he puts his hand to.' In addition to this, he has excellent backing, by means of which he is enabled to present the public with a weekly bill of fare, prepared by some of the first cooks of which Scotland can boast at present."-Dumfries

Courier.

"Our readers do not require to be informed of the high estimation in which we hold the Edinburgh Literary Journal.-Since the commencement of our undertaking, scarcely a week has passed in which we have not gratified a very great number of our readers, by transferring to our columns some part of its valuable contents. When we consider how many able individuals are engaged in supporting the Journal, by their literary exertions, we cannot wonder at the unexampled success which it has experienced. The number before us contains a greater variety of able literary articles than we have ever before met with in any similar publication."-Aberdeen Observer.

"We borrow the following article, with our best acknowledgments, from our able and eloquent contemporary, the Edinburgh Literary Journal. His access to the best sources of theatrical information is undoubted."-Edinburgh Weekly Journal.

"The last number of this hebdomadal is perhaps the most remarkable thing of the kind ever published in this country. It is full of literary gems, forming the most delightful melange of criticism, stories, sketches, essays, poetry, and varieties, we ever saw compressed into four-and-twenty closely printed pages. We doubt whether any work in Great Britain, of three times the bulk and pretension, can exhibit such an illustrious list of contributors."-Dundee Courier. "When this enterprising periodical was first announced, we view. Editor, and in the extent of his resources, the prospect of supplying ed the circumstance as offering, in the tried abilities and zeal of the a desideratum in the literature of Scotland. Our sentiments on this subject, judging from the numerous editions of our article in other papers, must have expressed those of the public; it, therefore, gives us additional pleasure to state now, that, by the progress of the work, these anticipations have been most amply realized. The suecess of the Journal, in fact, has been altogether unprecedented; but, in this merited prosperity, we see nothing to excite surprise; the entire publication, down to the manipulations of the printer and the discriminating patronage. The judicious and independent tone of paper-maker, is conducted in a manner to command enlightened and criticism, the importance and spirit of the original communications, are acknowledged not only to have redeemed the pledge given in the prospectus, but have already elevated the literary character of the work to be on an equality with the most respectable of its longer established compeers. A distinguishing characteristic of the Journaly indeed, is an absence of all flippancy and pretension, which we are inclined to attribute to the laudable practice of giving, in most instances, the names of the writers. weight, and has acquired for their decisions a confidence, which an This has given to the articles a nymous publications can never attain."-Ayr Advertiser.

"The very superior periodical of its class, from which we give the following extracts, is one whose intrinsic merits sufficiently account for its present popularity, while they promise ample recompense to the additional encouragement which it ought to receive. The Edis burgh Literary Journal was commenced in November last, supply literary information, and avoiding the more abstract character of ing the desideratum of a periodical in Scotland, chiefly devoted in larger Reviews, while it aimed at high respectability in the various contributions, not immediately connected with literary criticism, which it admitted. We would have much pleasure in recommending it, if any encomium of ours could extend the circulation of a paper so moderate in price, and conveying so much useful as well as amusing information."-Greenock Advertiser.

"This periodical not only continues to hold a distinguished rank among the hebdomadal productions of the day, but we are assured, has obtained a circulation far more extensive than even its warmest friends could reasonably expect. Its claims to public patronage are certainly high, it being the first publication of the kind in Scotland ranking among its contributors many of the most eminent writers of combining literary criticism, miscellaneous literature, &c. &c.; and the present day. Every week it produces something new, something instructing and amusing: in short, the object of the learned and ta lented Editor evidently is, to blend the useful wi h the agreeable, and hitherto his endeavours have been crowned with success."-Berwick Advertiser.

19, Waterloo Place. Price 6d., or stamped, to go free by Post, 10d. Published every Saturday Morning, by Messrs CONSTABLE & Co., Arrangements have been made, however, by which unstamped copies publication. are delivered in all the principal towns of Scotland on the day of

The JOURNAL is also sold in Monthly Parts, neatly covered. ANTICORROSIVE PERCUSSION CAPS AND TUBES;

WARRANTED PERFECTLY WATERPROOF,

AND AS HARMLESS TO THE GUN AS COMMON GUNPOWDER.

MANUFACTURED BY COLLINSON HALL, LONDON.

With respect to the quality and character of the above articles, it may be stated, that ever since the general introduction of Percussion Guas, for improvements on which C. Hall obtained, in 1818, the patronage of the Society for the Encouragement of the Arts and Sciences, Lon don, his Anticorrosive Caps, &c., which have occupied his almost exclusive study and attention from that period to the present hour, have met with the most decided preference of the first Sportsmen and Gunmakers in all parts of England, as well as in various parts of the Continent, and in America; and, from the great perfection to which they are now brought, it is perhaps impossible that any further improve ment can take place.

Sold at 10s. the thousand Caps, and 28s. the thousand Tubes,-bgr BUTLER & Co., Chemists, 73, Prince's Street, Edinburgh,-also by most respectable Gunmakers in all parts of the Kingdom.

N.B. Several articles of a very inferior and injurious description having recently been introduced into the trade, it is of much importance to gentlemen who value their guns, and who are anxi us to avoid even the chance of disappointment in the field, to supply themselves with such Caps only as can be fully and completely depended on.-COLLINSON HALL will have his name engraved on the label, which is pasted on the top of the boxes containing them.

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"We have no hesitation in praising it, since we happen to know that the most distinguished personage in literature, whom Scotland can or ever could boast of, has deliberately pronounced it to be the best book of its kind that has fallen into his hands. It is chiefly remarkable for skilful condensation of much matter, which has lost none of its value by undergoing that process-accurate and extensive historical knowledge, and elegance and vigour of diction. The formation of the plan of the work, and its various details, and the preparatory 4study, must have cost much more labour than the composition itself; for a plan more perfect-embracing such a variety of objects (all that is interesting and curious in Scottish scenery)-and showing the geographical relations in which these objects, and the roads conducting to them, stand to each other, never came under our observation.""The value of the whole work is much enhanced by a number of Maps, upon such a truly original and ingenious plan as do credit to the inventor.-Each of these is devoted to an entire tour, occupies a page and consists of three columns, in which are distinctly traced all the places of any note, (mountains, lakes, rivers, towns, villages, villas, &c.) along the route to be pursued, their relative distances, and the roads that diverge from the route."-Caledonian Mercury, 11th May, 1829.

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"Those, however, who desire to extend their knowledge of Loch Lomond, I would refer to Stirling and Kenney's Tourist's Guide of 1827-one of the best books of the kind I have met with."-Scotsman, 16th April, 1828.

ALSO,

Just published,

1. A MAP of the PICTURESQUE SCENERY of SCOTLAND. Price 2s. 6d. neatly done up; or coloured, and in a Case, 3s. 6d.

2. A New TRAVELLING MAP of SCOTLAND. Price 2s. 6d. neatly done up; or coloured, and in a Case, 3s. 6d.

TO THE DYSPEPTIC,
THE STUDIOUS, AND SEDENTARY.

Prepared, and sold in 2s. 9d. boxes,-and 10s. 6d. and 20s. cases, by BUTLER, CHEMIST TO HIS MAJESTY, No. 73, PRINCE'S STREET, EDINBURGH; and (authenticated by the Preparer's name and address, in the Label affixed to each box and case,) may be obtained of all the principal Druggists and Booksellers throughout the United Kingdom.

On the 22d of August will appear, in one volume, illustrated with
Engravings,

THE NATURAL HISTORY

OF

SELBORNE,

By the late Rev. GILBERT WHITE, A.M.
Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford.

A NEW EDITION, WITH ADDITIONS,

By SIR WILLIAM JARDINE, BART.
Author of "Illustrations of Ornithology," &c.

"The most fascinating piece of rural writing and sound English philosophy that ever issued from the press.” Athenæum. Edinburgh: CONSTABLE and Co., 19, Waterloo Place; and HURST, CHANCE, and Co., London.

Who have in preparation the following
ORIGINAL WORKS

CONSTABLE'S MISCELLANY.

FOR

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CHIVALRY and the CRUSADES. History of the Rise, Progress, and Decline of Knighthood, with a Picturesque View of its influence on the State of Society and Manners in Europe during the Middle Ages. By the Rev. HENRY STEBBING, M. A. 2 vols.

VII.

LIFE and REIGN of MAHMOUD II., present Grand Sultan of Turkey, including the Geographical, Moral, and Author of the "History of the Ottoman Empire," &c. 1 vol.

BUTLER'S COOLING APERIENT POW- Political History of that Empire. By EDWARD UPHAM, Esq.

VIII.

DERS,-produce an extremely refreshing Effervescing Drink, preferable to Soda, Seidlitz, or Magnesia Water, and at the same time A MILD AND COOLING APERIENT, peculiarly adapted to promote the healthy action of the Stomach and Bowels, and thereby prevent the recurrence of Constipation and Indigestion, with all their train of consequences, as Depression, Flatulence, Acidity or Heartburn, Headache, Febrile Symptoms, Eruptions on the Skin, &c. &c. and by frequent use will obviate the necessity of having recourse to CaTomel, Epsom Salts, and other violent medicines, which tend to debilitate the system. When taken after too free an indulgence in the luxuries of the table, particularly after too much wine, the usual disagreeable effects are altogether avoided. In warm climates they will be found extremely beneficial, as they prevent accumulation of Bile, and do not debilitate.

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Of whom may also be procured, BUTLER'S CARBONATED EFFERVES-thor CING HARROWGATE SALTS,-which contain all the solid ingredients of the celebrated Springs of Harrowgate, with the very important addition of the Volatile Gases in an immediate state of disengagement, by the addition of pure water, and altogether will be found a valuable substitute, proper for those Invalids who are unable to reside at Harrowgate. The Water of the Harrowgate Springs is very successfully used in cases of Scurvy, Scrofula, and Bilious and Gouty Affections; and it has, in particular, acquired great celebrity for the removal of the most complicated and obstinate Cutaneous Eruptions. The Salts are sold in 4s. 6d. and 10s. 6d. Bottles.

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This day is published, price 7s. 6d.
Dedicated, by permission, to Sir JAMES M'GREGOR, M.D. &c. &c.

MEDICINE NO MYSTERY: being a brief

Outline of the Principles of MEDICAL SCIENCE, designed as an Introduction to their general study, as a branch of a liberal education.

By JOHN MORRISON, M.D. and A.B., Trinity College, Dublin.

** The design of this Work is to vindicate the true dignity of Medicine, and to remove the opinion very generally entertained, that it is an art connected with mystery and conjuration, by showing, in an attractive and popular form, the scientific principles on which its practice is founded."

London: HURST, CHANCE, and Co., 65, St Paul's Churchyard.

This day is published, price 5s. 6d.

CONTENTS.-Memoirs of a Financier.-Principles of Elocution.

THE ENGLISHMAN'S GUIDE TO FRANCE. History of Intellectual Philosophy.-De Beranger's Life and Wr

By JAMES ALBANY, Esq.
London: HURST, CHANCE, and Co., St Paul's Churchyard.

Greek Revolution.-Abbot's on Cuba.-Ameri can Poems.-Popular Education.-Boston Exhibition of PicturesConstitutional History.-Quarterly List of New Publications.

O. RICH, London; and ADAM BLACK, Edinburgh.

FOR THE USE OF PRIVATE FAMILIES,
SCHOOLS, &c.

This day is published,

In one handsome volume, 12mo, price 6s. 6d.

Dedicated by permission to the
Right Hon. and Right Rev. THE LORD BISHOP of LONDON.

This day is published,
By JOHN BOYD, 37, George Street,
In octavo, price 3s. 6d.
No. II. OF

This day is published,

In one volume 8vo, price 10s. 6d.

Dedicated by permission to the DUKE of WELLINGTON.

SHARPE'S LONDON MAGAZINE,

For August 1829.

With an ENGRAVING by JOHN PYE, Esq. from a Drawing by,
GEORGE BARRET, Esq.

By WILLIAM WRIGHT, Esq.

Surgeon Aurist to her late Majesty Queen Charlotte, and to
his Grace the Duke of Wellington.
London: HURST, CHANCE, and Co., 65, St Paul's Churchyard.
ANTICORROSIVE PERCUSSION CAPS AND
TUBES;

WARRANTED PERFECTLY WATERPROOF,

AND AS HARMLESS TO THE GUN AS COMMON GUN-
POWDER.

CONTENTS.-I. Moise, an unpublished Tragedy by Chateaubriand -II. Evening, by George Darley-III. Lines by Miss Mitford-IV. Libel-V. The Prayer for Life, by Mrs Hemans-VI. Duke de Simon's Memoirs-VII. The Vision of the Picture-VIII. The Guard -IX. Address to the Ocean-X. Captain Basil Hall's American Travels-XI. Sonnet-XII. Katie Cheyne, by James Hogg-XIII. How to make a Paper-XIV. The Hlustrious Visitors, concluded-XV. Song-XVI. The Trooper's Song, by William Kennedy-XVII. Political Reflections-XVIII. The Monthly Club. London:-Published by JOHN SHARPE, Duke Street, Piccadilly; and sold by JOHN BOYD, 37, George Street, Edinburgh.

MANUFACTURED BY COLLINSON HALL, LONDON.

With respect to the quality and character of the above articles, it may be stated, that ever since the general introduction of Percussion Guns, for improvements on which C. Hall obtained, in 1818, the patronage of the Society for the Encouragement of the Arts and Sciences, London, his Anticorrosive Caps, &c., which have occupied his almost exclusive study and attention from that period to the present hour, have met with the most decided preference of the first Sportsmen and Gunmakers in all parts of England, as well as in various parts of the Continent, and in America; and, from the great perfection to which they are now brought, it is perhaps impossible that any further improve ment can take place.

Sold at 10s. the thousand Caps, and 28s. the thousand Tubes,-by BUTLER & Co., Chemists, 73, Prince's Street, Edinburgh,-also by most respectable Gunmakers in all parts of the Kingdom.

N.B. Several articles of a very inferior and injurious description having recently been introduced into the trade, it is of much importance to gentlemen who value their guns, and who are anxious to avoid even the chance of disappointment in the field, to supply themselves with such Caps only as can be fully and completely depended on.-COLLINSON HALL will have his name engraved on the label, which is pasted on the top of the boxes containing them.

Published this day, price 6s. 6d.

THE NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW.

No. LXIV.

JULY, 1829.

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This day, post 8vo, 8s. Ed.

THE LIFE of ARCHBISHOP CRANMER. FOREST SCENES and INCIDENTS in the

By J. A. SARGANT.

Wilds of NORTH AMERICA.

London: HURST, CHANCE, & Co., 65, St Paul's Churchyard.

The DIVINE ORIGIN of CHRISTIANITY, deduced from some of those Evidences which are not founded on the authenticity of Scripture.

By GEORGE HEAD, Esq.

JOHN MURRAY, Albemarle Street.

"The Author's buoyancy of spirits, his perpetual activity, and never-failing resources, in his hut residence in the Forest, during the severity of a Canadian winter, form an interesting feature of the volume."-New Monthly Magazine.

A TREATISE on the VARIETIES of DEAF- and glided down the Rapids of the St Lawrence with the same sense

"In the company of Mr Head we have skaited on Lake Simcoe,

NESS and DISEASES of the EAR.

of busy zest which we lately galloped over the Pam. pas with his shrewd and indefatigable brother Captain Head.

"The work before us is a very sensible and entertaining, yet whol ly unpretending production."-United Service Journal. IMPROVED EDITION OF HINDS' FARRIERY.

II.

In 12mo, the Fifth Edition, price 6s.

THOUGHTS, chiefly designed as PREPARA

TIVE or PERSUASIVE to PRIVATE DEVOTION.

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[No. 40. August 15, 1829.]

ADVERTISEMENTS,
Connected with Literature, Science, and the Arts.
THE EDINBURGH LITERARY JOURNAL,

OR

WEEKLY REGISTER OF CRITICISM AND BELLES LETTRES.

"From what I know of the Editor, a gentleman of talent, spirit, and perseverance, I foretel the book will prosper."-CHRISTOPHER NORTH, in Blackwood's Magazine for November, 1828.

"We have watched the progress of this able and enterprising periodical with no common interest. The Edinburgh Literary Journal has already become part and parcel of the existing system of our periodical literature, and will soon, we are convinced, be as thoroughly incorporated therein, as the Edinburgh Review or Blackwood's Magazine. Its success, indeed, has been quite extraordinary, and would be somewhat difficult to account for, did we not look to the array of distingui-hed names which appear in the list of its contributors, and to the singularly varied, spirited, and attractive articles, whether in the shape of reviews or original essays, which diversify and adorn its columns."-Caledonian Mercury.

"The last number of this hebdomadal is perhaps the most remarkable thing of the kind ever published in this country. It is full

A FEW Copies of the First Volume of this Work of literary gems, forming the most delightful melange of criticism,

are s'ill on Sale, price 15s. in boards.-The success which has attended the EDINBURGH LITERARY JOURNAL, since its commencement, has been quite unprecedented in the history of Scottish Periodicals; and the Proprietors are resolved to spare no expense or exertion to make it worthy of the patronage it has so liberally received. The highly flattering manner in which the JOURNAL has been already spoken of by many competent authorities may be judged of by the following passages, which are selected, almost at random, from a very great number of similar testimonials.

steries, e says, poetry, we ever saw compress ed into four-and-twenty closely printed pages. We doubt whether any work in Great Britain, of three times the bulk and pretension, can exhibit such an illustrious list of contributors."-Dundee Courier. "When this enterprising periodical was first announced, we view. ed the circumstance as offering, in the tried abilities and zeal of the Editor, and in the extent of his resources, the prospect of supplying a desideratum in the literature of Scotland. Our sentiments on this subject, judging from the numerous editions of our article in other papers, must have expressed those of the public; it, therefore, gives us additional pleasure to state now, that, by the progress of the work, these anticipations have been most amply realized. The success of the Journal, in fact, has been altogether unprecedented; but, in this merited prosperity, we see nothing to excite surprise; the entire publication, down to the manipulat ons of the printer and the paper-maker, is conducted in a manner to command enlightened and discriminating patronage. The ju icious and independent tone of criticism, the importance and spirit of the original communications, are acknowledged not only to have redeemed the pledge given in the prospectus, but have already elevated the literary char cter of the work to be on an equality with the most respectable of its longer established compeers. A distinguishing characteristic of the Journal,

"This periodical, which, from its commencement has been conducted with a degree of literary ability and spirt unprecedented in any work of the same description, has, we rejoice to state, obtained a very large share of public patronage. This is a degree of popularity we never expected to see any weekly publication of the kind attain in this country; for though from the first we had the fullest reliance on the talents and industry of the Editor of the Journal, we considered it almost impossible for any man to retain for any length of time, so many able and distinguished contributors as he has done, and will, we confidently anticipate, continue to do."-Edinburgh Observer.

"We thank our brother Editor of the Edinburgh Literary Journal for the passing notice which he has been pleased to take of our labours; and we can assure him that there are but few of our contemporaries for whose good opinion and talents we have so high a respect as for his."-Oxford Literary Guzette.

"The highest compliment that we can offer to the conductors of this periodical, (and these embrace the greatest names known to our literature,) must go forth to them in the simple statement, that we value it for its research, its animation, and its variety, more than any other weekly brochure that comes to our office. We have nothing to do but open the Edinburgh Literary Journal, when we wish to select some piquant morsel for the entertainment of our own readers. In its reviews of historical books it is profound and philosophic. It treats scientific subjects with all the master's acumen, and seems familiar with every thing that is encompassed within the sweeter and brighter walks of the light departments of literature - those, particularly, that lead to the cultivation of poetry, the fine arts, and, indeed, the Belles Lettres generally. We have already made several extracts from this admirable Literary Journal, and at the earliest opportunity shall continue to turn it to account."-Dublin Freeman's Journal.

"We have had the pleasure of perusing, for nearly six months, the Edinburgh Literary Journal, and we have fourd it, in all respects, as good a work of the kind as can be expected, and almost as good as can be desired. Now that we have before us the numbers of the Journal for the half year it has existed, and revive, by glancing over the various contents of the volume, our recollection of the great entertainment we have derived from its perusal, week by week, we feel still more strongly impressed with a sense of its paramount claim to public patronage. Its original matter, contributed by many popular Scottish writers, is of a very superior quality, whether in the grave or gay, the lively or severe style; its reviews and criticisms are judicious, and, we believe, impartial; and the scraps and passages of news of letters and the arts which it collects, are written with spirit, or selected with good judgment. We need not here make any selection from the volume, as no week passes in which we do not present to our readers one or more extracts, which we acknowledge we owe to the Journal."-Liverpool Saturday Advertiser.

"We suppose that many of our readers are natives of the north countree. To such we should recommend the Edinburgh Literary Journal, a weekly Register of Criticism and Belles Lettres, to which the greater number of distinguished Scottish writers are regular contributors."-The Spirit and Manners of the Age.

"For various kinds of work, the Editor is a host within himself; his range, in fact, includes the wide extremes of a song and a sermon,' and we may truly say of him in the words of the proverb, that nothing seems to come wrong he puts his hand to.' In addition to this. he has excellent backing, by means of which he is enabled to present the public with a weekly bill of fare, prepared by some of the first cooks of which Scotland can boast at present."-Dumfries

Courier.

"Our readers do not require to be informed of the high estimation in which we hold the Edinburgh Literary Journal.—Since the com

mencement of our undertaking, scarcely a week has passed in which we have not gratified a very great number of our readers, by transferring to our columns some part of its valuable contents. When we consider how many able individuals are engaged in supporting the Journal, by their literary exertions, we cannot wonder at the unexampled success which it has experienced. The number before us contains a greater variety of able literary articles than we have ever before met with in any similar publication.”—Aberdeen Observer.

"We borrow the following article, with our best acknowledgments, from our able and eloquent contemporary, the Edinburgh Literary Journal. His access to the best sources of theatrical information is undoubted."-Edinburgh Weekly Journal.

deed, is an absence of all flippancy and pretension, which we are inclined to attribute to the laudable practice of giving, in most instances, the names of the writers. This has given to the articles a weight, and has acquired for their decisions a confidence, which anonymous publications can never attain."-Ayr Advertiser.

following extracts, is one whose intrinsic merits sufficiently account The very superior periodical of its class, from which we give the for its present popularity, while they promise ample recompense to the additional encouragement which it ought to receive. The Edinburgh Literary Journal was commenced in November last, supplying the desideratum of a periodical in Scotland, chiefly devoted to literary information, and avoiding the more abstract character of larger Reviews, while it aimed at high respectability in the various contributions, not immediately connected with literary criticism, which it admitted. We would have much pleasure in recommending it, if any encomium of ours could extend the circulation of a paper so moderate in price, and conveying so much useful as well as amusing information."-Greenock Advertiser.

"This periodical not only continues to hold a distinguished rank among the hebdomadal productions of the day, but we are assured, has obtained a circulation far more extensive than even its warmest friends could reasonably expect. Its claims to public patronage are certainly high, it being the first public:tion of the kind in Scotland combining literary criticism, miscellaneous literature, &c. &c.; and ranking among its contributors many of the most eminent writers of the present day. Every week it produces something new, something instructing and amusing: in short, the object of the learned and talented Editor evidently is, to blend the useful with the agreeable, and hitherto his endeavours have been crowned with success."-Berwick Advertiser.

Published every Saturday Morning, by Messrs. CONSTABLE & Co., 19, Waterloo Place. Price 6d., or stamped, to go free by post, 10d. Arrangements have been made, however, by which unstamped copies are delivered in all the principal towns of Scotland on the day of publication.

The JOURNAL is also sold in Monthly Parts, neatly covered.

ANTICORROSIVE PERCUSSION CAPS AND

TUBES;

WARRANTED PERFECTLY WATERPROOF,

AND AS HARMLESS TO THE GUN AS COMMON GUN-
POWDER.

MANUFACTURED BY COLLINSON HALL, LONDON.

With respect to the quality and character of the above articles, it may be stated, that ever since the general introduction of Percussion Guns, for improvements on which C. Hall obtained, in 1818, the patronage of the Society for the Encouragement of the Arts and Sciences, London, his Anticorrosive Caps, &c., which have occupied his almost exclusive study and attention from that period to the present hour, have met with the most decided preference of the first Sportsmen and Gunmakers in all parts of England, as well as in various parts of the Continent, and in America; and, from the great perfection to which they are now brought, it is perhaps impossible that any further improvement can take place.

Sold at 10s. the thousand Caps, and 28s. the thousand Tubes,-by BUTLER & Co., Chemists, 73, Prince's Street, Einburgh,-also by most respectable Gunmakers in all parts of the Kingdom.

N.B. Several articles of a very inferior and injurious description having recently been introduced into the trade, it is of much importance to gentlemen who value their guns, and who are anxious to avoid even the chance of disappointment in the field, to supply themselves with such Caps only as can be fully and completely depended on.-COLLINSON HALL will have his name engraved on the label, which is pasted on the top of the boxes containing them.

This day, post 8vo, 8s. 6d.

FOREST SCENES and INCIDENTS in the

Wilds of NORTH AMERICA.

By GEORGE HEAD, Esq.
JOHN MURRAY, Albemarle Street.

"The Author's buoyancy of spirits, his perpetual activity, and never-failing resources, in his hut residence in the Forest, during the severity of a Canadian winter, form an interesting feature of the volume."-New Monthly Magazine.

"In the company of Mr Head we have skaited on Lake Simcoe, and glided down the Rapids of the St Lawrence with the same sense of reality and busy zest with which we lately galloped over the Pampas with his shrewd and indefatigable brother Captain Head.

"The work before us is a very sensible and entertaining, yet wholly unpretending production."-United Service Journal.

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NEW WORKS.

1. RETIREMENT. A POEM. BY THOMAS

STEWART, Esq. Author of an "An Epistle from Abelard

to Eloise." 3s. 6d.

2. GODESBERG CASTLE. A POEM. By MILES T. STAPELTON, Esq. Author of "La Pia, or the Fair Peni2s. 6d.

tent."

6. The HOTHOUSE and GREENHOUSE MANUAL, or Botanical Cultivator. By ROBERT SWEET, F.L.S. Fourth Edition. 12s.

7. SWEET'S HORTUS BRITANNICUS, a Catalogue of every Plant either known or cultivated in Great Britain, brought down to the present period. By ROBERT SWEET, F.L.S.

21s.

8. EDWARDS' BOTANICAL REGISTER, or Ornamental Flower Garden and Shrubbery. Continued by JOHN LINDLEY, Esq. F.R.S. Professor of Botany to the University of London. No. 6 of volume II., new Series. 4s.

This work is published the first of every Month, price 4s., and each number contains eight coloured Portraits of Living Plants, cultivated in the gardens, &c. of this country, accompanied by their history, method of cultivation, &c.

The SECOND VOLUME of WILMOT WARWICK is in the Press, and will be ready for publication in the course of August.

Sold by BELL & BRADFUTE, No. 6, Bank Street, Edinburgh; and RIDGWAYS, London.

CONSTABLE'S MISCELLANY.

I.

An AUTUMN in ITALY; being a PERSONAL NARRATIVE of a TOUR in the AUSTRIAN, TUSCAN, RO MAN, and SARDINIAN STATES, in 1827. By J. D. SINCLAIR, Esq. 1 vol.

II.

3. WILMOT WARWICK. Post 8vo, 9s.

4. MEMOIRS and CORRESPONDENCE of Ad-sing the History of the Commonwealth, from the year 1642 to the The LIFE of OLIVER CROMWELL, compriRestoration of Charles II. in 1660. By M. RUSSELL, LL.D. : vols.

miral Lord COLLINGWOOD. 4th Edition. In 8vo, with a fine Portrait, &c. 16s.

5. The SPEECHES of the Right Hon. GEORGE CANNING, corrected and revised by Himself. With Memoirs of his Life. By R. THERRY, Esq. Barrister at Law. Fine Portrait, Fac-similes, &c. 6 vols. 8vo, L.3, 12s.

TO THE DYSPEPTIC,

THE STUDIOUS, AND SEDENTARY.

BUTLER'S COOLING APERIENT POW

DERS,-produce an extremely refreshing Effervescing_Drink, preferable to Soda, Seidlitz, or Magnesia Water, and at the same time A MILD AND COOLING APERIENT, peculiarly adapted to promote the healthy action of the Stomach and Bowels, and thereby prevent the recurrence of Constipation and Indigestion, with all their train of consequences, as Depression, Flatulence, Acidity or Heartburn, Headache, Febrile Symptoms, Eruptions on the Skin, &c. &c. and by frequent use will obviate the necessity of having recourse to Calomel, Epsom Salts, and other violent medicines, which tend to debilitate the system. When taken after too free an indulgence in the luxuries of the table, particularly after too much wine, the usual disagreeable effects are altogether avoided. In warm climates they will be found extremely beneficial, as they prevent accumulation of Bile, and do not debilitate.

Prepared, and sold in 2s. 9d. boxes,-and 10s. 6d. and 20s. cases, by BUTLER, CHEMIST TO HIS MAJESTY, No. 73, PRINCE'S STREET, EDINBURGH; and (authenticated by the Preparer's name and address, in the Label affixed to each box and case,) may be obtained of all the principal Druggists and Booksellers throughout the United Kingdom.

New Edition of White's Natural History of Selborne, to form
Volume Forty Fifth of

CONSTABLE'S MISCELLANY.

Of whom may also be procured,

BUTLER'S CARBONATED EFFERVESCING HARROWGATE SALTS,-which contain all the solid ingredients of the celebrated Springs of Harrowgate, with the very Important addition of the Volatile Gases in an immediate state of disengagement, by the addition of pure water, and altogether will be found a valuable substitute, proper for those Invalids who are unable to reside at Harrowgate. The Water of the Harrowgate Springs is very successfully used in cases of Scurvy, Scrofula, and Bilious and Gouty Affections; and it has, in particular, acquired great celebrity for the removal of the most complicated and obstinate Cutaneous Eruptions. The Salts are sold in 4s. 6d. and 10s. 6d. Bottles.

On the 22d of August will appear, in one volume, illustrated with
Engravings,

THE NATURAL HISTORY

OF

SELBORNE,

By the late Rev. GILBERT WHITE, A.M.
Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford.

A NEW EDITION. WITH ADDITIONS,
By SIR WILLIAM JARDINE, BART.
Author of "Illustrations of Ornithology," &c.

"The most fascinating piece of rural writing and sound English philosophy that ever issued from the press."

Athenæum.
Edinburgh: CONSTABLE and Co., 19, Waterloo Place; and HURST
CHANCE, and Co., London.

Who have in preparation the following
ORIGINAL WORKS

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