The New Monthly Belle Assemblée, المجلد 30

الغلاف الأمامي
Joseph Rogerson, 1849
 

ما يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة

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الصفحة 246 - They say it was a shocking sight After the field was won ; For many thousand bodies here Lay rotting in the sun : But things like that, you know, must be After a famous victory. 'Great praise the Duke of Marlbro* won And our good Prince Eugene;' 'Why 'twas a very wicked thing !' Said little Wilhelmine; 'Nay . . nay . . my little girl,' quoth he, 'It was a famous victory. 'And everybody praised the Duke Who this great fight did win.' 'But what good came of it at last?' Quoth little Peterkin: — 'Why...
الصفحة 246 - IT was a summer evening, Old Kaspar's work was done; And he before his cottage door Was sitting in the sun, And by him sported on the green His little grandchild Wilhelmine.
الصفحة 246 - Tis some poor fellow's skull,' said he, 'Who fell in the great victory. 'I find them in the garden, For there's many here about; And often when I go to plough The ploughshare turns them out. For many thousand men/ said he, 'Were slain in that great victory.
الصفحة 355 - Then all for women, painting, rhyming, drinking, Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking. Blest madman, who could every hour employ With something new to wish or to enjoy ! Railing and praising were his usual themes, And both to show his judgment in extremes ; So over violent, or over civil, That every man with him was God or devil.
الصفحة 246 - Old Kaspar took it from the boy Who stood expectant by: And then the old man shook his head, And with a natural sigh "'Tis some poor fellow's skull," said he, "Who fell in the great victory.
الصفحة 246 - twas all about," Young Peterkin he cries ; And little Wilhelmine looks up With wonder-waiting eyes : " Now tell us all about the war, And what they fought each other for."
الصفحة 376 - Thence what the lofty grave tragedians taught In chorus or iambic, teachers best Of moral prudence, with delight received In brief sententious precepts, while they treat Of fate, and chance, and change in human life, High actions, and high passions best describing : Thence to the famous orators repair, Those ancient, whose resistless eloquence Wielded at will that fierce democratic, Shook the arsenal, and fulmined over Greece To Macedon and Artaxerxes...
الصفحة 51 - All that the art of the satirist does for other men, nature had done for him. Whatever was absurd about him stood out with grotesque prominence from the rest of the character. He was a living, moving, talking caricature. His gait was a shuffling trot; his utterance a rapid stutter; he was always in a hurry; he was never in time; he abounded in fulsome caresses and in hysterical tears. His oratory resembled that of Justice Shallow. It was nonsense effervescent with animal spirits and impertinence....
الصفحة 88 - For the history of our country during the last hundred and sixty years is eminently the history of physical, of moral, and of intellectual improvement.
الصفحة 88 - She had given a too easy admission to doctrines borrowed from the ancient schools, and to rites borrowed from the ancient temples. Roman policy and Gothic ignorance, Grecian ingenuity and Syrian asceticism, had contributed to deprave her. Yet she retained enough of the sublime theology and benevolent morality of her earlier days, to elevate many intellects, and to purify many hearts.

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