A Familiar explanation of the poetical works of Milton: to which is prefixed Mr. Addison's Criticism on Paradise lost ; with a preface by the Rev. Mr. Dodd

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Printed for J. and R. Tonson, 1762 - 144 من الصفحات
 

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الصفحة 127 - And another angel came and stood at the altar, having a golden censer, and there was given unto him much incense, that he should offer it with the prayers of all saints upon the golden altar which was before the throne. And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the angel's hand.
الصفحة 74 - For, lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone. The flowers appear on the earth ; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is heard in our land. The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, and the vines with the tender grape give a good smell. Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.
الصفحة 118 - And I looked, and behold a pale horse: and his name that sat on him was Death, and Hell followed with him. And power was given unto them over the fourth part of the earth, to kill with sword, and with hunger, and with death, and with the beasts of the earth.
الصفحة 43 - A shout that tore Hell's concave, and beyond Frighted the reign of Chaos and old Night.
الصفحة 31 - Milton seems to have been sensible of this imperfection in his fable, and has therefore endeavoured to cure it by several expedients...
الصفحة 6 - Troy, and engaged all the gods in factions. ^Eneas's settlement in Italy produced the Caesars and gave birth to the Roman Empire. Milton's subject was still greater than either of the former; it does not determine the fate of single persons or nations, but of a whole species.
الصفحة 125 - But when such persons are introduced as principal actors, and engaged in a series of adventures, they take too much upon them, and are by no means proper for an heroic poem, which ought to appear credible in its principal parts.
الصفحة 91 - The author appears in a kind of composed and sedate majesty; and though the sentiments do not give so great an emotion as those in the former book, they abound with as magnificent ideas. The sixth book, like a troubled ocean, represents greatness in confusion; the seventh affects the imagination like the ocean in a calm, and fills the mind of the reader, without producing in it any thing like tumult or agitation.
الصفحة 144 - I have endeavoured to show how some passages are beautiful by being sublime, others by being soft, others by being natural; which of them are recommended by the passion, which by the moral, which by the sentiment, and which by the expression.
الصفحة 15 - ... of others. Virgil has excelled all others in the propriety of his sentiments. Milton...

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