The golden treasury of ancient Greek poetry

الغلاف الأمامي
Clarendon Press, 1867 - 538 من الصفحات

من داخل الكتاب

ما يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة

لم نعثر على أي مراجعات في الأماكن المعتادة.

طبعات أخرى - عرض جميع المقتطفات

مقاطع مشهورة

الصفحة 363 - As when in heaven the stars about the moon Look beautiful, when all the winds are laid, And every height comes out, and jutting peak And valley, and the immeasurable heavens Break open to their highest, and all the stars Shine, and the Shepherd gladdens in his heart...
الصفحة 363 - And these all night upon the bridge' of war Sat glorying; many a fire before them blazed : As when in heaven the stars about the moon Look beautiful, when all the winds are laid, And every height comes out, and jutting peak And valley, and the immeasurable heavens Break open to their highest, and all the stars Shine, and the Shepherd gladdens...
الصفحة 362 - As when about the silver moon, when air is free from wind, And stars shine clear, to whose sweet beams, high prospects, and the brows Of all steep hills and pinnacles, thrust up themselves for shows, And even the lowly valleys joy to glitter in their sight, When the unmeasured firmament bursts to disclose her light, And all the signs in heaven are seen, that glad the shepherd's heart...
الصفحة 366 - Reeeives, the city with a hundred gates, Whence twenty thousand chariots rush to war, And would he give me riches as the sands, And as the dust of earth, no gifts from him Should soothe me, till my soul were first avenged For all the offensive license of his tongue. I will not wed the daughter of your chief, Of Agamemnon. Could she vie in charms...
الصفحة 501 - A good sherrissack hath a two-fold operation in it. It ascends me into the brain; dries me there all the foolish and dull and crudy vapours which environ it; makes it apprehensive, quick, forgetive, full of nimble fiery and delectable shapes; which, delivered o'er to the voice, the tongue, which is the birth, becomes excellent wit.
الصفحة 396 - to the workshop or the sheep-fold, from Jove and Apollo to the wandering mendicant, every rank and degree of the Greek community, divine or human, had its own proper allotment of poetical celebration. The gods had their hymns, nomes...
الصفحة 365 - How best from hostile fires to save his ships. He hath completed many mighty works Without my aid ; hath built a lofty wall, And dug a trench around it, wide and deep, And in the trench hath fix'da palisade...
الصفحة 421 - ... elaborate dramatic structure, but a more expanded dialogue, and a comparative simplicity of speech like that of living Greeks : and we find too a certain admixture of rhetorical declamation, amidst the greatest poetical beauty which the Grecian drama ever attained. But when we advance to Euripides, this rhetorical element becomes still more prominent and developed.
الصفحة 362 - Thus they will nourish thy extremes: ' This dame was Hector's wife, A man that, at the wars of Troy, did breathe the worthiest life Of all their army.' This again will rub thy fruitful wounds, To miss the man that to thy bands could give such narrow bounds. But that day shall not wound mine eyes; the solid heap of night Shall interpose, and stop mine ears against thy plaints and plight!
الصفحة 387 - ... beat. Then cried the godlike seer, uprising from his seat : 46 " Ah wretched ! what is this ? what horrible woe Comes on ye now ? Night folds in dark embrace Your heads, your features, and your knees below ; Wild cries are kindled, tears are on the face, Blood stains the walls and each columnar space ; With ghosts the vestibule, the court, doth swarm, Who toward the far realms of the west apace Strive, with their eyes on Erebus ; the sun's form Dies from the heaven, and falleth a black shadow...

معلومات المراجع