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in the company. Skelton then his hearers were not as this invented the scheme of blind- lady, and he thundered to good folding the waiter, that the purpose wherever he went, and first he might catch should supported his stern opinions pay the reckoning, and thus with his own lack of conventhey all escaped.” It was

It was a tionality. “I set out on the wonderful invention truly, and road of orthodoxy," said he, rather befitting the hero of “but I found leisure to switch a jest-book than an orthodox the Arians now and then.” divine. But that is the strength And in good truth he switched of Philip Skelton: though his them all, and defended his own orthodoxy was impregnable, he opinions with admirable enalways remained a man of in- ergy. “Between you and me,” finite humour and fierce passion. he said to a friend, "I'll pawn

So Skelton left Dublin, where my salvation on the truth of he had more acquaintances than the Trinity." any man in the college, to take Appointed curate at Monaorders in the Church. It was ghan, this fighting Christian, Bishop Sterne, of Clogher, who who should have ruled others, ordained him, and it is charac- wasted the best years of his teristic of the man that on life in futile subservience. Maythe day of ordination he threw be it is not strange that proanother deacon down - stairs. motion came slowly to one who His first curacy was

inter- cared not to conciliate his felrupted speedily by a brawl lows; but promotion did come with the vicar's wife; but he slowly, and Skelton freely athad already discovered not tributed his failure to the only the splendid charity which treachery of his bishop. Nor dominated his life, but his did he accept the neglect in talent for preaching. On the amiable silence. “God forgive one hand, he was not a “ dull me,” he would say, “I railed drowsy lecturer," nor, on the against him most violently, but other, was he one of “the he did not regard it; his stasmooth pretty preachers.” His tion placed him far above me, discourses were apt to draw and what did he care for the tears or to arouse laughter. censure of a

poor curate?” On the subject of hell-fire he However, Skelton neither forwas peculiarly eloquent, and got nor forgave: if the bishop he could move the most cul- slighted him, he ignored the tured audience to terror. Once bishop. He never attended a when he had preached before visitation during the rest of a too refined congregation he the bishop's life; and so far was told that a certain lady did he carry his rancour, as did not like his sermon. “Oh,” always to insult bishop replied Skelton, “she has a good wherever he found him, and right not to like sermons about whoever he might be. Meanhell's fire, for she is mistress to while, though he followed the Archbishop of York, and serious profession, he did not all London knows it." But all neglect the

But all neglect the prowess of his

a

a a

morial; and on another occa- he was a fine boxer, and most sion when a friend insisted that dexterous at the small-sword, all clergymen were gentlemen, the back-sword was his favourite he turned upon him with a kind weapon, and once at Donnybrook of fierceness—“Our Saviour was Fair he won a hat set up as a no gentleman,” he cried ; “the prize for the best cudgel-player. apostles were no gentlemen But having gained the victory either.

he made a bow to the girls, and But, gentleman or no gentle- told them he fought just to man, he would endure insolence please them, and returned the from no man, and the spirit of hat that they might have the combat showed itself early more amusement. “A hero in within him. His career at romance,

says the faithful Trinity College, Dublin, was biographer, “could not have

,

“ disturbed by brawls of all been more complaisant to the kinds, and though he distin- fair sex.” So complaisant was guished himself in scholarship, he, indeed, that he perfected he regarded the authorities as himself also in the art of danchis natural foes. With Dr ing. “ He could both dance Baldwin, the Provost, he had a gracefully and dance long”— lasting feud, and that stiff- again we quote Burdy-“two necked Whig, using the worst rare qualities united.” And all insult he knew, denounced his the while he was resolutely prepupil for a Jacobite. The re- paring to enter the Church. sult was that Skelton left the But his strangest prank of university two years before his all was so near to swindling, scholarship expired. But his and it is described by the bioconduct was never marked by grapher with so cold a humour, the priggishness of the student. that not a word of it should be His mighty strength and his lost. It is the more interestaptitude for sports of all kinds ing, too, because it has been gave him an early superiority repeated unconsciously a thouamong his fellows, while his sand times, and was gravely reirascible temper made him ported not six months ago in a ever prompt to quarrel. Once, French newspaper. Thus it is indeed, he was only saved from brought within the domain of a duel on St Stephen's Green by folklore, and is the best posthe diplomacy of his friends ; sible proof that Samuel Burdy and on another occasion he modelled his style on the pedraised a riot in the streets, and lar's wares. • The following a man was unfortunately killed trick of his ” (we quote textu

( by some of the party. “This," ally), “which has since been says Burdy, with his usual im- practised by some others, is not perturbability, “had a serious unsuitable to the character of a effect upon him.” However, he young man in the college. He was not always thus blood- and twelve more, dining at thirsty, and at the common an inn near Dublin, when the games of skill and strength he reckoning was to be paid, they was always an adept. Though discovered there was no money

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in the company,

Skelton then his hearers were not as this invented the scheme of blind- lady, and he thundered to good folding the waiter, that the purpose wherever he went, and first he might catch should supported his stern opinions pay the reckoning, and thus with his own lack of conventhey all escaped."

It was

a tionality. “I set out on the
wonderful invention truly, and road of orthodoxy,” said he,
rather befitting the hero of “ but I found leisure to switch
a jest-book than an orthodox the Arians now and then.”
divine. But that is the strength And in good truth he switched
of Philip Skelton: though his them all, and defended his own
orthodoxy was impregnable, he opinions with admirable en-
always remained a man of in- ergy. “Between you and me,”
finite humour and fierce passion. he said to a friend, "I'll pawn

So Skelton left Dublin, where my salvation on the truth of
he had more acquaintances than the Trinity."
any man in the college, to take Appointed curate at Mona-
orders in the Church. It was ghan, this fighting Christian,
Bishop Sterne, of Clogher, who who should have ruled others,
ordained him, and it is charac- wasted the best years of his
teristic of the man that on life in futile subservience. May-
the day of ordination he threw be it is not strange that pro-
another deacon down - stairs. motion came slowly to one who
His first curacy was

inter- cared not to conciliate his fel-
rupted speedily by a brawl lows; but promotion did come
with the vicar's wife; but he slowly, and Skelton freely at-
had already discovered not tributed his failure to the
only the splendid charity which treachery of his bishop. Nor
dominated his life, but his did he accept the neglect in
talent for preaching. On the amiable silence. “God forgive
one hand, he was not a “dull me,” he would say, “I railed
drowsy lecturer," nor, on the against him most violently, but
other, was he

one of

" the he did not regard it; his stasmooth pretty preachers.” His tion placed him far above me, discourses were apt to draw and what did he care for the tears or to arouse laughter. censure of

a poor curate?On the subject of hell-fire he However, Skelton neither forwas peculiarly eloquent, and got nor forgave: if the bishop he could move the most cul- slighted him, he ignored the tured audience to terror. Once bishop. He never attended a when he had preached before visitation during the rest of a too refined congregation he the bishop's life; and so far was told that a certain lady did he carry his rancour, as did not like his sermon. “Oh,” always to insult bishop replied Skelton, “she has a good wherever he found him, and right not to like sermons about whoever he might be. Meanhell's fire, for she is mistress to while, though he followed a the Archbishop of York, and serious profession, he did not all London knows it.” But all neglect the prowess of his

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morial ;” and on another occa- he was a fine boxer, and most sion when a friend insisted that dexterous at the small-sword, all clergymen were gentlemen, the back-sword was his favourite he turned upon him with a kind weapon, and once at Donnybrook of fierceness—“Our Saviour was Fair he won a hat set up as a no gentleman,” he cried ; “the prize for the best cudgel-player. apostles were gentlemen But having gained the victory either."

he made a bow to the girls, and But, gentleman or no gentle- told them he fought just to man, he would endure insolence please them, and returned the from no man, and the spirit of hat that they might have the combat showed itself early more amusement. “ A hero in within him. His

at romance,' says

the faithful Trinity College, Dublin, was biographer, “could not have disturbed by brawls of all been more complaisant to the kinds, and though he distin- fair sex.” So complaisant was guished himself in scholarship, he, indeed, that he perfected he regarded the authorities as himself also in the art of danchis natural foes. With Dring “ He could both dance Baldwin, the Provost, he had a gracefully and dance long”lasting feud, and that stiff- again we quote Burdy—“two necked Whig, using the worst rare qualities united." And all insult he knew, denounced his the while he was resolutely prepupil for a Jacobite. The re- paring to enter the Church. sult was that Skelton left the But his strangest prank of university two years before his all was so near to swindling, scholarship expired. But his and it is described by the bioconduct was never marked by grapher with so cold a humour, the priggishness of the student. that not a word of it should be His mighty strength and his lost. It is the more interestaptitude for sports of all kinds ing, too, because it has been gave him an early superiority repeated unconsciously a thouamong his fellows, while his sand times, and was gravely reirascible temper made him ported not six months ago in a ever prompt to quarrel. Once, French newspaper. Thus it is indeed, he was only saved from brought within the domain of a duel on St Stephen's Green by folklore, and is the best posthe diplomacy of his friends; sible proof that Samuel Burdy and on another occasion he modelled his style on the pedraised a riot in the streets, and lar's wares. • The following a man was unfortunately killed trick of his ” (we quote textuby some of the party. “This," ally), “which has since been says Burdy, with his usual im- practised by some others, is not perturbability, "had a serious unsuitable to the character of a effect upon him." However, he young man in the college. He was not always thus blood- and twelve more, dining at thirsty, and at the common an inn near Dublin, when the games of skill and strength he reckoning was to be paid, they was always an adept. Though discovered there was no money

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ely pre ch ank

in the company.

Skelton then his hearers were not as this invented the scheme of blind- lady, and he thundered to good folding the waiter, that the purpose wherever he went, and first he might catch should supported his stern opinions pay the reckoning, and thus with his own lack of conventhey all escaped.” It was a tionality. “I set out on the wonderful invention truly, and road of orthodoxy,” said he, rather befitting the hero of “but I found leisure to switch a jest-book than an orthodox the Arians now and then.” divine. But that is the strength And in good truth he switched of Philip Skelton : though his them all, and defended his own orthodoxy was impregnable, he opinions with admirable enalways remained a man of in- ergy. “Between you

and

me, finite humour and fierce passion. he said to a friend, “I'll pawn

So Skelton left Dublin, where my salvation on the truth of he had more acquaintances than the Trinity.” any man in the college, to take Appointed curate at Monaorders in the Church. It was ghan, this fighting Christian, Bishop Sterne, of Clogher, who who should have ruled others, ordained him, and it is charac- wasted the best years of his teristic of the man that on life in futile subservience. Maythe day of ordination he threw be it is not strange that proanother deacon down - stairs. motion came slowly to one who His first

curacy was inter- cared not to conciliate his felrupted speedily by a brawl lows; but promotion did come with the vicar's wife; but he slowly, and Skelton freely athad already discovered not tributed his failure to the only the splendid charity which treachery of his bishop. Nor dominated his life, but his did he accept the neglect in talent for preaching. On the amiable silence. “God forgive one hand, he was not a “dull me,” he would say, “I railed drowsy lecturer,” nor, on the against him most violently, but other, was he

“ the he did not regard it; his stasmooth pretty preachers." His tion placed him far above me, discourses were apt to draw and what did he care for the tears or to arouse laughter. censure of a

poor curate?On the subject of hell-fire he However, Skelton neither forwas peculiarly eloquent, and got nor forgave: if the bishop he could move the most cul- slighted him, he ignored the tured audience to terror. Once bishop. He never attended a when he had preached before visitation during the rest of a too refined congregation he the bishop's life; and so far was told that a certain lady did he carry his rancour, as did not like his sermon. “Oh," always to insult a bishop replied Skelton, “she has a good wherever he found him, and right not to like sermons about whoever he might be. Meanhell's fire, for she is mistress to while, though he followed a the Archbishop of York, and serious profession, he did not all London knows it.” But all neglect the

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