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Devrient, his description of the Jena students at the Weimar theatre,

ii. 251 ; his observations on the Weimar school, 252.
Dialogue's, Goethe's early compositions, i. 23.
Dictation, Goethe's favorite mode of composition, ii. 452.
De bereiner, story of Goethe's keeping his bar of platinum, ii. 408.
Doda's Beauties of Shakespeare, its influence in Germany, i. 78.
Dogs, performing, refuseu admittance on the Weimar stage, ii. 265.
Doinesticity, its antagonism to genius, i. 148.
Drama, Greek, traditional errors concerning, ii. 9; necessary calm-

ness of evolution mistaken for calmness of life, 10.
Dramatists, unacted, error of, ii. 242.
Dresden, Goethe's visit to, i. 81.
ECKERMANN, his account of the extension of Wilhelm Meister's

Wanderjahre, ii. 418.
Egmont, å universal favorite, but not a masterpiece, ii. 66 ; a novel

in dialogue, not a drama, 67 ; a character of Egmont a type of

humanity, 67 ; analysis of the play, 68; criticisms on, 77.
Egoism of genius, i. 149.
Eichhorn's Introduction to the Old Testament studied by Goethe, ii.

225.
Einsiedel, character of, i. 344.
Elective Affinities, the, ii, 377.
Elgin marbles, effect of their discovery on Goethe, ii. 407.
Emilia and Lucinda, story of, i. 110.
Engravings, by Goethe, i. 82.
Enthusiasm, Goethe's, character of, i. 47.
Erfurt, congress of, ii. 369.
Erl-king, the, ii. 350.
Erwin und Elmire, composition of, i. 307.
Esenbeck, Nees von, recognizes Goethe's discovery respecting the

Metamorphoses of Plants, ii. 119.
Euripides, parallel between his Iphigenia and that of Goethe,

ii. 14.

FABRICIUS, Goethe's comment on a chapter in, i. 103.
Faith, general want of, in the eighteenth century, i. 199 ; Goethe's

idea of, in connection with knowledge, 284.
Faust, analysis of Maler Müller's play of, ii. 339.
Faust, gradual development and progress of, ii. 282; the problem

of our intellectual existence and picture of our social existence,
284 ; resemblance between Faust and Hamlet, 285 ; popularity
and prodigality of Faust, 286 ; the Idea, 287; analysis of the
first part, 287; the theatre prologue, 287; the prologue in
heaven, 290 ; necessity for the two prologues, 294 ; first scene
of Faust in his study, 295; the scene before the gate, 300 ;
Faust's study, 302 ; Auerbach's cellar, 306; the witches'
kitchen, 306 ; meeting with Margaret, 306 ; wood and cavern,
308; the Walpurgis nacht, 311 ; causes of the early disap-
pointment, and after-fascination of the readers of Faust, 317;
Coleridge's criticisms compared with Goethe's own observations,
343.

Faust, second part of, embarrassment in expressing a faithful opinion

of it, ii. 429; comparison of the impressions produced by the first
and second parts, 430 ; character of the second part, 431 ; causes

of its failure, 433; analysis and criticisms, 435.
Faustus, Marlowe's, analysis of, ii. 324.
Fellow Sinners, tne, Goethe's drama of, i. 70.
Fischerin, die, Goethe's operetta of, i. 386.
Fisherman, the, Goethe's poem of, i. 379.
Fire-brigade instituted at Weimar at the instigation of Goethe, ii. 27.
Frankfurt-on-the-Maine, the native place of Goethe, i. 17; its two-

fold character, 19; its occupation by the French, 36 ; their de-
parture, 40; rough manners of Frankfurt, 55; Goethe's ovation,

ii. 405.
Frankfurter Gelehrten Anzeigen, i. 151.
Frederic the Great, literary tendencies of, opposed to Goethe, i. 407;

his indirect influence on literature, 408.
Frederika. See Brion.
French verses of Goethe, i. 99.
Friday evenings, ii. 166.
Galen, indicated the existence of the intermaxillary bone in man,

ii. 138.
Gall, his visit to Jena, ii. 356 ; Goethe's appreciation of his theory,

356.
Gartenhaus, the, i. 375; given to Goethe by Karl August, 376.
Genius, hereditary transmission of, discussed, i. 5; its antagonism

to domesticity, 147; egoism of 149.
German architecture, Goethe's tractate on, i. 135.
German culture of Goethe, i. 114.
German Literature, survey of, i. 239 ; idealism its dominant and

persistent characteristic, 240 ; struggle between idealism and
realism, 248 ; the Nibelungen Lied, 250 ; effect of the cru-
sades, 251 ; of the reformation, 254 ; two-fold protest of the
eighteenth century, 256 ; Klopstock, the representative of German
idealism, 256 ; Wieland, the representative of German realism,
259; Lessing, the real revolutionary leader of the German mind,
260; Herder the lineal descendant of Lessing, 264; Goethe, the

realist, and Schiller, the idealist, 266.
German morals, laxity of, in the 18th century, i. 352 ; based on

sentimentalism, 352.
Germany no nation, ii. 390 ; Goethe's opinion concerning, 291 ; its

social condition in the 18th century. See Weimar.
Gervinus, his criticism on Wilhelm Meister, ii. 207.
Geschwister, die, Goethe's play of, i. 388.
Gleim, story of his first meeting with Goethe, i. 361.
Goethe, Johann Wolfgang, character and extent of his claim to great-

ness, i. 3; intellect his primary faculty, and justice his primary
virtue, 4; hereditary transmission of qualities discussed, 5; his
ancestry, 7; silence concerning his grandfather the tailor, 9;
genealogical tables of the Goethe and Texter families, 10, 11;
character of his father and mother, 12 ; his subjection of emotions

to reason, 14 ; his birth, 17; feeling for Italy, 17 ; moderate ele-
vation of his social status, 20 ; his precocious babyhood, 20; his
love for his sister Cornelia, 21; his love of story telling, 21; his
grandmother and grandfather Textor, 22; his early compositions i
in Latin and German, 23 ; character of his precocity, 26; his
school life, 27; character not formed by circumstances, 29; early
religious doubts awakened by the Lisbon earthquake, 31 ; early
symbolical representation of the soul's aspirations to the Deity, 33;
the Seven Years' war, 34 ; invention of little stories, 35 ; occupa-
tion of Frankfurt by the French, 36; visits to the theatre, 37;
acquires French, 37; mock duel with Derones, 38; his early play,
39; entertains a profound contempt for the unities, 39 ; departure
of the French and resumption of study, 40; writes a polyglott
romance, 40 ; masters Hebrew, 41 ; dictates a biblical poem on
Joseph and his brethren, 41 ; influence of Fräulein von Kletten-
berg, 42; early love for Gretchen, 42 ; his disappointment, 44;
fascination of his nature, 45 ; characteristics of his childhood, 46;
his manysidedness, 47 ; his seriousness, formality and rationality,
47 ; rational character of his enthusiasm, 47; his impatient sus-
ceptibility, 49; commences his collegiate life at Leipsic, 53;
wearies of logic and jurisprudence, 54 ; his appearance in society,
55 ; acquaintance with Frau Böhme, 56 ; literary society at the
table d'hôte of Herr Schönkopf, 59; falls in love with Anna Katha-
rina Schönkopf, 60 ; description of Goethe in Horn's letters to
Moors, 61; composition of Die Laune des Verliebten, 66 ; works of
Goethe an embodiment of his experiences, 67; pranks and extrar:
agancies with Behrisch, 68; composition of The Fellow Sinners,
75 ; objective character of Goethe's genius, 74 ; concrete tendency
in his works, 75; compared with Shakespeare, 76 ; his moral
toleration, 77; neglects his collegiate studies, 78 ; his love songs,
79; joins Oeser's drawing class, 80; trip to Dresden, 81 ; learns
engraving, 81 ; serious illness, 82 ; state of religious doubt, 83;
returns to Frankfurt, 84 ; his reception, 84 ; letters to Käthchen
Schönkopf, 85; unpleasant relations with his father, 90; studies
in alchemy, 91 ; religion, 91 ; passing affection for Charity Meix-
ner, 92; proceeds to Strasburg university, 93 ; description of his
person, 93 ; general progress, 95; his disgust at the Système de
la Nature, 96 ; his exasperation at the pictures exhibited to Marie
Antoinette, 97; his French verses, 99 ; mystical metaphysical
studies. 100 ; early tendency towards nature worship, 100; notes
on Bayle's criticism, 102 ; comment on a chapter in Fabricius, 103;
improved demeanor, 104 ; increased circle of friends, 105 ; ac-
quaintance with Stilling and Lerse, 105 ; conquers his irritability
and sensitiveness, 107 ; two love poems, 108 ; dancing lessons at
Strasburg, 109 ; story of Emilia and Lucinda, the dancing master's
daughters, 109 ; his German culture, 114 ; acquaintance with
Herder, 115 ; Herder's opinion of him, 116; strange introcluction
to the Brion family, 118 ; falls in love with Frederika, 119 ; obtains
his doctor's degree, 126 ; his oration on Shakespeare, 130; his
tractate on German architecture, 135; parting with Frederika,
136 ; his reception by his father, 141; his reluctance to appear in

print, 143 ; his anguish at having renounced Frederika, 144 ;
composition of Götz von Berlichingen, 153 ; his meagre account of
Wetzlar in his Autobiography, 169; Kestner's description of him,
172 ; his acquaintance with Gotter, 175; his connection with the
Göttingen school, 176 ; falls in love with Charlotte Buff, 179 ;
visit to Höpfner, 185; melancholy departure from Wetzlar, 186 ;
interrogates fate whether he should become an artist, 190 ; studies
at Frankfurt, 192 ; rewrites Götz, 193 ; its publication, 195 ; let-
ters to Kestner and Charlotte, 201 ; coquetting with suicide, 201 ;
state of his mind 202; meditates a drama on Mahomet, 206 ; dan-
gerous intimacy with Maximiliane, 209; publication of Götter,
Helden und Wieland, 211 ; first acquaintance with Karl August,
213; composition of Werther, 217 ; distinction between Werther
and Goethe, 224 ; prodigious effect of the publication, 228 ; Goethe
obtains the forgiveness of Kestner and Charlotte, 235 ; lottery
marriage with Anna Sybilla Münch, 269; composition of Clavi-
go, 270; acquaintance with Klopstock and Lavater, 279 ; religious
opinions, 282 ; acquaintance with Basedow, 285; with Jacobi,
287; his personality, 288 ; studies Spinoza, 288 ; the Moravian
doctrines, 291 ; idea of an epic on the Wandering Jew, 292 ; frag,
ment of Prometheus, 296 ; affection for Lili, 296 ; Erwin und
Elmire, 307; composition of Stella, 309 ; tour in Switzerland,
311; separation from Lili, 314 ; accepts Karl August’s invitation
to Weimar, 314 ; creates a sensation, 351; close intimacy with
Karl August, 355 ; elected to the post of Geheime Legations Rath,
357 ; breach with Klopstock, 361; Gleim's anecdote of Goethe,
362; falls in love with the Frau von Stein, 369; his Gartenhaus,
375; fondness for fresh air and water, 378 ; ballad of the Fisher-
man, 379; appearance in the character of a water-sprite, 380 ;
useful influence at Weimar, 381; theatricals, 382; his acting,
388 ; general amusements and occupation, 389; love and ambition,
392 ; letters from sentimental youths, 394; composition of Triumph
der Empfindsamkeit, 394 ; journey to the Harz in disguise, 395 ;
interview with Plessing, 396 ; suicide of Fräulein von Lassberg,
401; increased hate of Wertherism, 402 ; manifold employments,
405 ; contempt for the Prussian court, 406 ; story of his protégé,
Kraft, 410; mental crystallization, ii. 3; boundless productiveness
of fancy combined with an indestructible love of nature, 4; earnest-
ness of manhood, 5; composition of the Iphigenia in prose, 6; re-
view of the Iphigenia, 9; official duties, 27; made Geheimrath, 28 ;
journey with Karl August to Frankfurt and Strasburg, 28; inter-
views with Frederika and Lili, 29; changes in his mode of life, 31;
feels authorship to be his true mission, 37; poem of Ilmenau,
40; journey in the Harz with Fritz von Stein, 42; prepares the
planet dance, 43; oration on the re-opening of the Ilmenau mines,
43; discovers the intermaxillary bone in man, 44 ; studies in
natural history, 45 ; charities, 46 ; changes in Weimar society,
47 ; secret departure for Italy, 51 ; his residence in Italy, 52;
return to Weimar, 77 ; relieved from his official duties, 79 ; first
acquaintance with Schiller, 81; connection with Christiane Vul-
pius, 86 ; review of Tasso, 101 ; character of Goethe as a man of

science, 115 ; second visit to Italy, 165 ; campaign in France, 167;
description of his house in the Frauenplan, 182; the Burger-
general, 185; the Aufgeregten, 185 ; Reinecke Fuchs, 186 ; history
and character of his friendship with Schiller, 189; review of Wil-
helm Veister, 205 ; review of Hermann und Dorothea, 228 ; his-
tory of his management of the Weimar theatre, 244 ; his mode of
life at Weimar, 208; last years of Schiller, 271 ; review of Faust,
282 ; review of the Lyrical Poems, 346 ; battle of Jena, 355 ;
outburst against Napoleon, 359; marriage with Christiane, 360;
nature of his acquaintance with Bettina, 365; interview with
Napoleon, 370; supposed servility, 375; passion for Minna Herz-
lieb, 377; review of the Wahlverwandtschaften, 378; acquaintance
with Beethoven, 387; indifference to politics, but earnestness in
art, 889; not true that he looked on life as an artist,' 395;
character of his religion, 395; his morals, 400; character of his
old age, 402; his oriental studies, 403; the West-östliche Divan,
404; ovation at Frankfurt, 407; publication of the Kunst und
Alterthum, 407; growing tendency towards mysticism, 408; visit
of Werther's Charlotte to Weimar, 408; death of Christiane, 409;
anecdote of his enlargement of the Jena library, 410; quarrel with
the Landtag, 412; charged with stealing an ingot of gold, 414;
story of the hundred engravings borrowed from Knebel, 415; re-
view of Wilhelm Meister's Wanderjahre, 417; spread of his fame,
421; vitality of his old age, 422; passion for Fräulein von Lewe-
zow, 422; celebration of his jubilee at Weimar, 423; protection of
his copyright throughout Germany, 425; death of Karl August,
426; review of the second part of Faust, 429; his eighty-first year,
442; indifference to the revolution of 1830 in comparison with the
scientific contest between Cuvier and St. Hilaire, 443; death of his
only son, 445; tribute from fifteen Englishmen, 446; interview
with Thackeray, 450; activity in his old age, 452; signs of decay,

453 ; his death, 456.
Goethe family, genealogical table of, i. 10.
Goethe, Johann Caspar, father of the poet, i. 8; his character, 12;

dissatisfied with his son's progress at Leipsic, 84 ; his harshness to
Cornelia, 90 ; his pride in his son, but distress at his manners,

141, 143 ; his death, ii. 33.
Goethe, Katharina Elizabeth, mother of Goethe, i. 9; her character,

12 ; her stories to her children, 21 ; her death, ii. 386.
Goethe, Cornelia, sister of the poet, his love for her, i. 21; her

father's harshness, 90 ; her marriage, 206 ; her death, 393.
Goethe, Frederick, i. 8.
Goethe, Hans Christian, i. 8.
Goethe, Jacob, early death of, i. 36.
Goethe, Ottilie von, her marriage, ii. 403 ; death of her husband, ii.

439.
Gold, ingot of, report that Goethe had stolen one, ii. 414.
Goldsmith's Deserted Village, translated by Goethe and Gotter, i.

176.
Göchhausen, Mlle., her character, i. 343.
Gott und die Bajadere, ii. 350.

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