صور الصفحة
PDF

A BALL AD, sung a x Mr R s. KNIGHT.

*: &ritten am composed Is Y Tri o on.1 s II. Is a r1, x", Esq. . -- ‘S. >

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors]

* Does a • my one- know

wil - 11am when just come from ses,

it is long since we met?-

my Año

{{ Yes,

well

[graphic][graphic]
[graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][subsumed][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

lives with her own - Granny dear,” “Gre • na - diers did you say! did you say .

[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

- Anniette fiew to welcome him home, - Quoth pretty Annette, “D

But turnod from the maid with disdain, To call me inconstant and frai “False girl, I suppose you are come, . " Beware, Master William, beware • To jeer me, and iaugh at my pain? I trump up anol Since scandal hath blotted your name, *Tis true, when such stories as so I deem you unworthy a tear; we should not believe half thi Iove been told by an elderly dame, , , , Yet I own that my Grammy is old,

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

hears

[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]

o Original. ' *: 2%
* T H E T R A IT o R' s Doo MI.
a — . *.
k “Suspicion is a heavy armour, *
o That impedes more than it protects.”
*. BYRox.

Day had sunk into the arms of night, and the city of Paris was still, no busy crowds thronged the passages, and no splendid cavalcade drew forth the citizens with curious looks: naught, save the heavy tread of the mailed sentinel, was heard before the royal palace, as he slowly paced his weary march. The night was beautiful to look upon; the stars seemed to glitter more brightly than their wont, and the moon now reached her full, careered majestically along her star-lit path. A happy group were gazing on her glories, and one among them whispered in the ear of his companion, “Marie, thou art

fairer-than yon glorious orb, and thy sight more
pleasant to mine eye than her light to the sea-

test mariner.” The speaker was Philip of

France, (the third of that name who bore the

* Gallic sceptre.) He stood on a balcony of the
palace, and his queen leaned against his bosom.

in the full confidence of a strong and fervent -----love. His countenance was marked with an air of amiable serenity, and his dark and expressive eye rested on the fair form that he supported.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Finding resistance vain, the chamberlain yielded to his importunities, and approached the spot where the king and queen were standing. “Welcome, La Brosse,” said the king kindly, “ thou wert not with us in council this morning —hah wert pondering on some new scheme for the nation's weal? We forgive thee, but would have thee send us word when again detained from our deliberations.” “But sire, the reasons”— “Nay, nay, thou art a good servant, and we this once indulge thee; therefore no more.”The group for a long time tarried, and the time flew on, scarce noticed, so deeply were they engaged in conversation, one while amused by the artless prattle of the boy, another listening to the eloquent descriptions of La Brosse, who discoursed on every subject, as if conscious of his superior powers. •. -- None heard more eagerly than the queen; she loved to enjoy these happy moments with her family, and the confidant of the king, when the cares of state were dismissed, and the true feelings of the soul drew aside the veil of hypocrisy, which power is compelled to wear. The evening passed, the terrace was deserted, and the king happy in the fidelity of his subjects, and the affections of his spouse, could rest in quiet, and not find thorns where his wearied frame would seek repose. By early dawn he had arisen, and soon greeted Marie, “A fair morn to thee, dearest; the balmy air invigorates, and the brightsun Smiles again on happy France;—happy! what is happiness to a king? it has been thought beyond his highest hopes, and as the object only of his vainest dreams. Can'st tell me?” “Ay, something whispers an answer to thy question; do not I answer it? do not I love thee,

and will not that dispel the clouds of sadness which gather on thy brow, even in the darkest day?” *

“In faith, well answered, and right lovingly; but would thy smiles blunt the spears of rebel vassals, or thy frail form turn aside the falchion's

[blocks in formation]
[graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

and wear the coronet like a king “With majesty indeed; but into the cloud before us; who can tell what may come to blast thy hopes, and turn thy exultation into sorrow. God grant that day may be far hence”— They were startled by a loud shriek, proceeding from an adjoining apartment; and the next moment a female domestic rushed in with pale and horror-stricken countenance; she attempted to speak but was unable to utter a syllable, while

she beckoned with her finger to the royal pair,

who stood almost petrified at the sudden and alarming interruption. Believing that some robber or assassin had been discovered, Philip drew his sword and followed the domestic. But all was silent; not a sound was heard, and no intruder to be seen. On a couch lay the two young princes undisturbed by the confusion around them;--* There !” cried the female, pointing to the couch. The king raised Lewis in his arms, but he fell back heavily, a cold and senseless corse. His long and glossy ringlets were flung in beautiful disorder over the silken pillow, his eyes were gently closed, and a sweet smile still lingered about his lips, as if in mockery of death, but the pale and marble brow, and the icy nerveless hand, told too truly that the pure spirit had forever fled. The care worn countenance of age assumes a look more ghastly, when the king of terror strikes with his sceptre; but who can gaze on the beautiful habitation of the young and unsul

lied soul, but with feelings of delight; it is a

sadly pleasing contemplation thus to behold the bud nipped and withered by that icy and relentless hand. The queen threw herself by the side of the body, in an agony of grief, and the little Philip who was still by his brother's side, raised his lisping voice and said, “Dear mamma, why don't you wake Lewis 2 he looks so pale it almost frightens me, but then I know he loves me.”— This simple appeal touched the spring of the father's sorrow, and covering his face with his hands, he rushed from the chamber, and gave vent to his anguish in a flood of tears.

Prince Lewis was borne to his resting place, amid the tears, and sympathies of thousands for the bereaved parent, who saw the child of his affections laid in consecrated earth, with sorrow

for his untimely fate, and wonder"at the sudden

ness of his death. Even while he bent over the

[blocks in formation]

to we cannot look

| he reached the palace, and retiring immediately

to his private closet, ordered the chamberlainto

be summoned. La Brosse was soon at his side.

The king looked inquiringly into the countenance of his confidant, as if to read there an answer to his yet unspoken question, but the mar

ble features were silent.

“La Brosse?” said the king. “I am here, Sire; is there aught within my power that can heal thy wounded heart? most gladly would my life purchase thy tranquillity.” “There is that within me, that rends my soul, preys on my vitals, gnawing to my very heart's core; I endure a torture more cruel than very flames could inflict;-suspense—suspicion-dost understand P’’ & The chamberlain recoiled, and remained in an attitude of attention. # Philip pursued. “Didst thou hear afoul whisper floating on the air, that spoke of treason, when our son was entombed with his ancestors—or when some damned fiend amid the darkness, coupled it with a name so pure, that angels

might not blush to bear Speak out and fear .

not.” s & * : .. o “My master,” replied-the chamberlain, “do

not, I pray thee, compel me to speak of this mat- 'o,

ter; sooner should my tongue be plucked out by the roots, than it should utter a syllable against one who holds thy affections, and doubtless does most nobly deserve them.” . . . . . . .

“I warn thee, trifle not; we would know all, and by the throne of heaven, we will; it is a deed

[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

and faultering tongue, the dismayed courtier .

promised to divulge all that he knew, and w

the narrative proceeded, Philip sat with clenche a

teeth, and his countenance grew pale and col for love, when attacked by suspicion, qui yields, and hatred, bitter and inexorable; place. La Brosse asserted nothing positiv hinted the inferences of his own observation

instilled into the mind of the king suspicions un

favourable to his consort. That he had often ob

served in her a strong aversion to the young

princes, and that her ambition;

[ocr errors]

itemned theides

[graphic][graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][merged small]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

artfully, and at the same time with so much ap

parent frankness were these sentiments advanced that the king warmly proffered his thanks; but his rage was ungovernable, as the thought of his wife's infamous guilt crossed his mind, it seemed as if the furious commotion within him could only be calmed by the death of his betrayer, and his thirst for vengeance only satisfied by her blood. But he was not entirely blind to the necessity of producing stronger proof to warrant any violent means; the eyes of the world were upon him, and the pride of the king for a time triumphed over the feelings of the man. He knew that some report of the deed was bruited abroad, and the nation would be his judges in the

award which the guilt shöuld receive. It was of therefore deemed more prudent, to remain inac

[blocks in formation]

hear a tale of every day occurrence; if there be aught of weighty import, unburden thee of it

ncloak thee, we have no masquerading here to

night.” At this command the cloak was suffered

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

of their supplanting her own offspring (if she

“Thou shameless villain, get thee gone, or 1 will have thy scarecrow body swung to the terrace railings —gold ! and why? what hast thou done for gold? would'st thou tempt me to hire thy poniard, and pay thee the price of blood?” “Humph! not just so—nor much different— marry, a good guesser; but there was a prince Lewis, a fairer child than my mother ever called me.”

“Hell's fiends! get on—speed thee, or I'll dig thy heart out.” -

[blocks in formation]

said before, or was going to say, we sent the Prince to heaven!” # * * “Great God, is it then so I can'st prove thy words, and show her guilt as black and hideous as the caves of the abyss?” *. “I will swear it in the face of France.” “Then, before France, ere a fortnight has passed, shalt thou confront this guilty wretch, and if thou dost make firm thy words, thou shalt find a monarch can be generous as well as just: till then these walls must keep thee safe from harm.” - * - 3%. ; The king then summoned a guard, and de

livering the prisoner into their hands, gave

orders to keep him securely, but treat him with kindness and supply all his wants. . . . .

The unexpected death of the heir apparent caused a great sensation throughout the whole of France; many were the rumours as to its cause, and many a hard word was spoken, and evil suggestion made of its supposed author, spreading like wildfire, till it became the story of the village gossip, and was spoken of even in the precincts of the court, in no undertone. A con

firmation was soon found in a proclamation by s

herald, in the name of the king, attainting queen Marie of high treason, and appointing a day for the trial. The period so anxiously expected at length arrived, and at an early hour all Paris

was in motion to behold this unparalleled exam

ple of female depravity, and the triumph of justice over the feelings of the husband. A spacious arena was enclosed, as for a tournament; stages were erected, the higher for the accommodation

of the nobility, while below the dense mass of the . populace waved like a troubled sea, while ever

and anon their deafening shouts rose upon the air.

Either end of the lists was provided with bars or .

barriers; in the centre between scaffold hung with sable drapg

from a large heap of faggots. tly opposite

[ocr errors]

a post rose

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic]
[graphic][graphic]
[graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
« السابقةمتابعة »