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CHILD'S MANUAL

OT

GOOD MANNERS.

I.

CONDUCT TO PARENTS, &c.

know you.

MY DEAR CHILDREN,—The manner in which you conduct yourselves to your parents commends you to the esteem or dislike of all who

There is not a sadder sight than that of a child void of the natural affection and respect which all owe to those whose watchful care and tender love have guarded them from the cradle; who, when sickness or childish fears have assailed them, have suffered the deepest anxiety on their account, and to supply whom with warm clothing, and the other comforts of life, have exerted themselves with inexhaustible devotion and labour.

It is the most beautiful trait in the character of children to be tenderly affectionate to their parents; to be obedient and submissive to them in all things; to show a deferential regard to all their wishes and suggestions, and to be ever ready to manifest the utmost respect for them, by cheerfully complying with all their commands or desires.

Young people should also be humble in spirit, as well as obedient in duty, to those who, by providence as well as by the ties of nature, have a just claim to their subjection, whether these be in the capacity of guardians, masters, or tutors; for, be it remembered, that their admonitions are given with no other object in view than to benefit those under their charge.

MY DEAR YOUNG FRIENDS, Be always respectful; never bold, forward, nor saucy, either in words or gestures; in conduct, be ever pliable, and thus prove the inward reverence you entertain for those older and wiser than yourselves.

Accustom yourselves in early youth to obedience; and if you are spared to come to riper years, it will become habitual to you in the more advanced periods of life, when it may be required of you, as an important part of your daily duty.

Rely upon the truth of this; if you perseveringly strive to be obedient and dutiful when young, you will be reverenced and obeyed when old.

The circumstances of some whom I now address may change, so as to force them to become servants. To all such I say,

for your own happiness and worldly prosperity, as well as for the happiness of those under whom God, in his all-wise arrangement, has been pleased to place you, be faithful and obedient. In all things act honestly and conscientiously, ever remembering that the eye of the Lord is apon you; for, although unseen by your earthly employer, your heavenly Father sees and knows all your actions, wishes, and thoughts.

II.

CONDUCT AT HOME.

On entering the house, take your hat off, and clean your shoes. Always bow to strangers whom you meet at home.

If you wish to speak to your parents, and see them engaged in discourse with company, draw back and leave your business till afterwards; but if you must speak to them, be sure not to whisper, but speak in a low tone.

Never address your parents but in a respectful manner.

Dispute not, nor delay to obey your parents' commands.

Go not out of doors without your parents' leave; and be sure to return by the time they appoint.

Never grumble, nor show discontent at any thing your parents appoint, speak, or do.

If any command or errand be given you to perform, do it with cheerfulness and alacrity. This shows a good disposition, and good breeding.

Bear with meekness and patience, and without murmuring or sullenness, your parents' reproofs or corrections, although they should sometimes happen to be undeserved.

Never make wry faces, contortions, nor grimaces while any one is giving you commands.

Never take another's chair, if it be vacated for a short time. It is impolite.

Say good night, and go to bed immediately you are desired to do so; and do not pout or sulk, for in doing so, you grieve your parents, and show strangers what a disobedient child you are.

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