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DUKE July 19. At Fleurs, his' Grace James ]); Roxburghe, in the 88th year of his age. !! succeeded William (Bellenden), who John Kerr, the Duke of Roxburghe, sot known to the literary world as the in whose taste for old books laid the furi. the club which bears his name. Jom ir of the direct male branches of the ani. family of Kers. His successor Willis

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July 26. At Barogill Castle, the Right ,' Earl of Caithness, Lord-Lieutenant of ,and Postmaster-General for Scotland. Lord, originally Sir James Sinclair (t. ceeded to the earldom of Caithnessa: the former line, without the fortun:*** accustomed to support the dignity. !! however, found his Lordship an ko quisition to their ranks, and well que

Aug. 1. At Dacre Lodge, the Rivi cis Lord Napier. His Lordship was Lord Napier, by Mary Anne, daug?! Lord Cathcart; was born in 1758, his father in 1775. In 1781, he Margaret, eldest daughter of Sir by whom he has left William Napier, (who married Miss Cosi and has two sons and three da and Henry Alfred, and four data life his Lordship served in the ar about the close of the Americani late French war, he served as L of the Hopetoun Fencibles, till i reduced. In 1796, his Lordshus of the sixteen representative pee in which he continued since, a ment summoned in 1806, which sion. In 1802, he succeeded Dr

Aug. 27. At Paris, the Rig? Earl of Hopetoun. His Latv Airthrie, Lord Hope, (Lord i Lord Niddry 1817, British titi of Linlithgowshire, Knigh Order of the Bath, a Genera of the 42d foot, (Royal Hip the Royal Bank of Secti the Royal Company of Ai

His Lordship succeeder'. half-brother, in 1816, ali John Earl of Hopetouli, with Jane, daughter of Esq., and was born on i He married-first, Elizi! Charles Hope Weir of

in 1801, without Louisa Dorother derburn of John, no 1803

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If there be a twenty-year old book It is, however, by far the best transin the world that is “ as good as MS." lation of a foreign tragic drama which

- that is to say, that nobody has seen, our English literature possesses ; and although many have talked of it, it is as such, it is well worthy of being the translation of Schiller's Wallen- more effectually recalled to the recolstein, by Mr Coleridge. The fact is, lection of the present reading public. that the existence of such a work had Strange certainly, but as certainly true been almost entirely lost sight of, un- it is, that we have nothing like any til it was recalled to a sort of “ Life- adequate version of any one of the in-death,” by being made to furnish masterpieces of Greek-of Spanishsome quotations for the beginnings of even of French tragedy. And it is chapters in “ The Scotch Novels.” not less true, that, besides this one, The author of those Novels mentioned we have no excellent complete transWallenstein, on one of these occa- lation of any German tragedy whatsions, as more magnificent in the ever-except, perhaps, Mr Gillies's English of Coleridge than in the Gere version of Müllner's Guilt, and Müllman of Schiller ;" and in the recent ner is not yet a master. But Schiller republication of The Friend, Mr Cole is not only one of the true masters of ridge acknowledges this extravagant German tragedy, but he is, we have compliment in a strain of still more no hesitation in saying, by far the extravagant gratefulness. The author greatest master of tragedy that has of Waverley understands English bet- appeared in Europe since the death of ter than German—therefore he enjoys Calderon. In many particulars he is the translated Wallenstein more fully the inferior of Goethe-but in the than the original ; but it was not fair drama, the real living drama of tragic to disparage Schiller in this style. Had action, he is, we cannot doubt, his Schiller translated the Ancient Mari- illustrious countryman's superior. The ner into German, he could have pro- Faust is a thing by itself—it is a duced nothing so good as Coleridge's thing of a kind by itself—it is a new original; and Coleridge's Wallenstein creation-it places its author in the is an admirable translation—but it is very first rank of human genius; but nothing more—it is not an original, it is not a tragic drama in the same it is not so magnificent as the Wallen- sense with Egmont, or any of Goethe's stein of Schiller.

pieces meant for the stage. To all of VOL. XIV.

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* Want of room obliges us to omit the usual List of New Books, Appointments, fc.

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Wallenstein, translated by Coleridge. If there be a twenty-year old book It is, however, by far the best transin the world that is “as good as MS.” lation of a foreign tragic drama which

- that is to say, that nobody has seen, our English literature possesses ; and although many have talked of it, it is as such, it is well worthy of being the translation of Schiller's Wallen- more effectually recalled to the recolstein, by Mr Coleridge. The fact is, lection of the present reading public. that the existence of such a work had Strange certainly, but as certainly true been almost entirely lost sight of, un- it is, that we have nothing like any til it was recalled to a sort of “ Life- adequate version of any one of the in-death,” by being made to furnish masterpieces of Greek- of Spanishsome quotations for the beginnings of even of French tragedy. And it is chapters in “ The Scotch Novels.” not less true, that, besides this one, The author of those Novels mentioned we have no excellent complete transWallenstein, on one of these occa- lation of any German tragedy whatsions, as “ more magnificent in the ever-except, perhaps, Mr Gillies's English of Coleridge than in the Gere version of Müllner's Guilt, and Müllman of Schiller ;" and in the recent ner is not yet a master. But Schiller republication of The Friend, Mr Cole is not only one of the true masters of ridge acknowledges this extravagant German tragedy, but he is, we have compliment in a strain of still more no hesitation in saying, by far the extravagant gratefulness. The author greatest master of tragedy that has of Waverley understands English bet- appeared in Europe since the death of ter than German—therefore he enjoys Calderon. In many particulars he is the translated Wallenstein more fully the inferior of Goethe-but in the than the original; but it was not fair drama, the real living drama of tragic to disparage Schiller in this style. Had action, he is, we cannot doubt, his Schiller translated the Ancient Mari- illustrious countryman's superior. The ner into German, he could have pro- Faust is a thing by itself—it is a duced nothing so good as Coleridge's thing of a kind by itself—it is a new original ; and Coleridge's Wallenstein creation—it places its author in the is an admirable translation—but it is very first rank of human genius ; but nothing more—it is not an original- it is not a tragic drama in the same it is not so magnificent as the Wallen- sense with Egmont, or any of Goethe's stein of Schiller.

pieces meant for the stage. To all of VOL. XIV.

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these, Schiller's Wallenstein, Carlos, influence upon the great mind of Engand Bride of Messina, are decidedly land. It was the Minstrelsy of the superior. They have more of the real Scottish Border that first turned atvis dramaticathey have much more tention largely and deeply to the lanof the fire and the life-they come guage and the poetry of Scotland ; nearer Shakespeare in those particular and the works of Burns gradually qualities, wherein, considered merely profited by the same circuinstances, as a writer for the stage, he is as un- which opened the full career of a still rivalled, as, in some other and yet more splendid popularity to the greathigher things, he is, and, in all pro- est of all his poetical successors. Had bability, will ever be, unapproached. Burns lived, what he might have done An admirable version, therefore, of one no one can tell-but he was cut off of this great author's inost admirable early in life ; and when we reflect how works, is a possession of which we late it was ere his intellectual youth ought to be exceedingly proud ; and (considering all the disadvantages unwe very gladly embrace this opportu- der which he laboured) could be said nity of noticing it at some length, for to terminate, he died much younger three several reasons.

than any other poet of his years.

Even 1st, By doing so, we shall, at very laying this aside, had he lived till little cost of labour, furnish our read- now, he would not have been an old ers with a first-rate piece of entertain- man.-But what avail such speculament and delight.

tions ? 2dly, We shall probably incite the At the time when Coleridge pubbookseller (whoever he is) that has lished his Wallenstein, then, it may the copy-right, to publish a new edi- be said, that the English public had tion of the whole work; and we shall got out of the habit of looking for thereby do a service both to Mr Cole- good new poetry. The toleration of ridge and to the public, as well as to such a barren coxcomb as Hayley, is the said bookseller. And,

a sufficient proof of the low state to 3dly, We shall, we would fain hope, which these matters had been rea incite--if not Mr Coleridge himself--- duced. The fact, that such idiots as men of talent not quite so unjust to Miss Seward and her Litchfield crothemselves as he is and has been to nies were suffered to have any sort of himself, to make further experiments intellectual existence at all, is, if poson the fruitful field of genuine Ger- sible, still more conclusive. Such was man tragedy.- Mr R. P. Gillies and the profound languor into which we Lord Francis Gower, in particular, had fallen, that nothing but a stimuhave already shewn themselves to be lant of the very first-rate power had in possession of every accomplishment the least chance of rousing us. It was this labour requires; and we would not the display of juvenile ingenuity earnestly hope neither of them will -it was not the elegance of imitation turn a deaf ear to the public voice -it was not even the bloom of true which bids them proceed. There is promise, that could disturb such a leSample room and scope enough" for thargy: Nay more-it was not even both; and, unless we be greatly mis- genius, highest genius itself, exerted taken, anything as good as the Eng- in any other form than one of equal lish Wallenstein produced now, would excellence and novelty, that could be be sure to meet with a very different sufficient to work such a wonder. The reception from that which was vouch- early poems of Coleridge and Southey safed to Coleridge by the reading pub- were totally ineffectual appeals to the lic of 1800.

ear of the slumbering giant. Even That was a strange period in many Wordsworth appealed in vain, for his points of view-and, in a literary music was not the trumpet-note to point of view, at least as much so as wake the dead. But at last a trunin any other. There had been, we pet-note was heard, and from the apmay say, a pause-a total pause in pearance of the Lay of the Last Minour poetry for a full score of years strel, there has been neither slumberfor although Burns, one of the most ing nor folding of the hands to sleep. genuine of poets, had been astonish- Mr Coleridge's translation from ing Scotland, Scotland was then mere Schiller appeared just when the apaScotland, and his genius had not up thy had attained that depth, which to that time exerted any commanding was, although no one dreamed of it,

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