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It not only saps the foundation of every rs upon you a deluge of crimes and evils. which first putrefies by stagnation, and oxious vapours and fills the atmosphere herefore from idleness, as the certain gilt and ruin. And under idleness I e inaction only, but all that circle of ons in which too many saunter away

spetually engaged in frivolous society ments ; in the labors of dress or the Meir persons.

Is this the foundation
or future usefulness and esteem? By such
nts do you hope to reconi mend yourselves
s part of the world, and to answer the ex-
your friends and your country? Amuse-
in requires ; it were vain, it were cruel to
lem. But though allowable as the relaxation,

ost culpable as the business of the young.
When become the gulf of time, and the poison
nd. They foment bad passions. They weak.
anly powers. They sink the native vigor of
to contemptible effeminacy.
VIII.- Proper Employment of Time.-IB.
DEEMING your time from such dangerous waste,
lo fill it with employments which you may review
satisfaction. The acquisition of knowledge is one
Te most honorable occupations of youth. The de-

of it discovers a liberal mind, and is connected with ny accomplishments and many virtues. But though ur train of life should not lead you to study, the course education always furnishes proper employments to

well disposed mind. Whatever you pursue, be emulous to excel. Generous ambition, and sensibility to praise, are, especially at your age, among the marks of virtue. Think not that any affluence of fortune, or any levation of rank, exempts you from the duties of ap

ication and industry. Industry is the law of our be10917; it is the demand of nature, of reason armaris A. leav vsember, always, that the years which pune, tuune, sads, leave permanent memorials

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Remember how unknown to you are the vicissitudes of the world ; and how often they, on whom ignorant and contemptuous young men once looked down with scorn, have risen to be their superiors in future years. Com-passion is an emotion of which you onght never to be ashamed. Graceful in youth is the lear of sympathy,and the heart that melts at the tale of woe. Let not ease and indulgence contract your affections, and wrap you up in selfish enjoyment. Accustom yourselves to think of the distresses of human life ; of the solitary cottage, the dy-.ing parent and the weeping orphan. Never sport with pain and distress in any of your amusements, nor treat .. even the meanest insect with wanton cruelty.

VII.-Industry and Application.--'B.

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DILIGENCE, industry, and proper improvement of time, are material duties of the young. pose are they endowed with the best abilities, if they. want activity for exerting them. Unavailing in this case, will be every direction that can be given them, either for their temporal or spiritual welfare. In youth the habits of industry are most easily acquired ; in youth the incentives to it are strongest, from ambition and from duty, from emulation and hope, from all the prose, pects which the beginning of life affords. If, dead to these calls, you already languish in slothful inaction, what will be able to quicken the more sluggish current of advancing years ? Industry is not only the instrument of improvement, but the foundation of pleasure. Nothing is so opposite to true enjoynient of life, as the relaxed and feeble state of an indolent mind. He who is a stranger to industry may possess, but he cannot enjoy. For it is labor only which gives the relish to pleasure. It is the appointed vehicle of every good man. It is the indispensible condition of our possessing a sound mind in a sound body. Sloth is so inconsistent with both, that it is hard to determine whether it be a greater foe to virtue, or to health and happiness. Inactive as it is in itself, its effects are fatally powerful. Though it appear a slowly flowing stream, yet it underminesallthasis stable

and flourishing. It not only saps the foundation of every virtue, but pours upon you a deluge of crimes and evils. It is like water, which first putrefies by stagnation, and then sends up noxious vapours and fills the atmosphere with death. Fly therefore from idleness, as the certain parent both of guilt and ruin. And under idleness I include, not mere inaction only, but all that circle of

trifling occupations in which too many saunter away their youth ; perpetually engaged in frivolous society or public amusements ; in the labors of dress or the ostentation of their persons. Is this the foundation which you lay for future usefulness and esteem? By such accomplishments do you hope to reconimend yourselves to the thinking part of the world, and to answer the expectations of your friends and your country? Amusements youth requires ; it were vain, it were cruel to prohibit them. But though allowable as the relaxation, they are most culpable as the business of the young. For they then become the gulf of time, and the poison of the mind. They foment bad passions. They weak: en the manly powers. They sink the native vigor of youth into contemptible effeminacy.

VIII.- Proper Employment of Time.-B. REDEEMING your time from such dangerous waste, seek to fill it with employments which you may review with satisfaction. The acquisition of knowledge is one of the most honorable occupations of youth. The desire of it discovers a liberal mind, and is connected with many accomplishments and many virtues. But though your train of life should not lead you to study, the course of education always furnishes proper employments to a well disposed mind. Whatever you pursue,

be emulous to excel. Generous ambition, and sensibility to praise, are, especially at your age, among the marks of virtue. Think not that any affluence of fortune, or any elevation of rank, exempts you from the duties of application and industry. Industry is the law of our being ; it is the demand of nature, of reason and of God. Remember, always, that the years which now pass over your heads, leave permanent memorials behind them.

From the thoughtless mind they may escape ; but they remain in the remembrance of God. They form an important part of the register of your life, They will hereafter bear testimony, either for or against you, at that day, when, for all your actions, but particularly fur the employments of youth, you must give an account to God. Whether your future course is destined to be long or short, after this manner it should commence, and if it continue to be thus conducted, its conclusion, at what time soever it arrives, will not be inglorious or unhappy.

IX.-The true Patriot ART OF THINKING.

ces

ANDREW DORIA, of Genoa, the greatest sea cap. tain of the age he lived in, set his country free from the yoke of France. Beloved by his fellow-citizens, and supported by the emperor Charles V. it was in his pow. er to assume sovereignty, without the least struggle. But he preferred the virtuous satisfaction of giving liberty to his countrymen. He declared in public assembly, that the happiness of seeing them once more restored to liberty, was to him a full reward for all his servi

i that he claimed no pre-eminence above his equals, but remitted to them absolutely to settle a proper form of government. Doria's magnanimity put an end to factions, that had long vexed the state ; and a form of government was established, with great unanimity, the same, that with very little alteration, subsists at present. Doria lived to a great age, beloved and honored by his countrymen ; and without ever making a single step out of his rank as a private citizen, he retained to his dying hour, great influence in the republic. Power, founded on love and gratitude, was to him more pleasant than what is founded on sovereignty. His memory is reverenced by the Genoese ; and, in their histories and public monuments, there is bestowed on him the most honorable of all titles-FATHEK of his CUUN. TRY, and RESTORER of its LIBERTY.

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