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its cause, 125; on the vitality of fishes, as tested by increase of temperature, 125; on the question whether the oxide of arsenic taken in very minute quantities for a long period is injurious to man, 125.

Dawkins (W. Boyd) on the Wokey Hole hysena-den, 71.

Dee Cloizeaux (A.), relation entre les phenomenes de la polarisation rotatoire, et les formes hemiedres ou hemimorphes des cristaux a un ou a deux axes optiques, 19; memoire sur les modifications temporaires et permanentes que la chaleur apporte a quelques propri^tes optiques de certains corps cnstallises, 38.

Devon and Cornwall, W.Pengelly on the correlation of the slates and limestones of, with the old red sandstones of Scotland, &c, 85.

Diluvial soil of Brabant, &c, Dr. Phipson on the, 53.

Dingle (Rev. J.) on the supernumerary bows in the rainbow, 22.

• on specimens of flint instruments

from North Devon, 72.

•Doughty (Mr.) on flint instruments from Iloxne, 72.

Dowie (James) on the loss of muscular power arising from the ordinary footclothing now worn, and on the means required to obviate this loss, 125.

Dunn (Robert.) on the psychological differences which exist among the typical races of man, 144.

Dynamics, Prof. Boole on the differential equations of, 3.

•Earth, W. Ogilby on the excentricity of the, and the method of finding the coordinates of its centre of gravity, 17.

, Prof. Hennessy on the relative

amount of sunshine falling on the torrid zone of the, 31.

and moon, Prof. Hennessy on some

of the characteristic differences between the configuration of the surfaces of the, 14.

's atmosphere, Rev. Prof. Challis on

the extent of the, 29.

Earthworm, Dr. John Davy on the blood of the common, 124.

Eastern Archipelago, Alfred R. Wallace on the trade of the, with New Guinea and its islands, 148.

Eclipses, W. Spottiswoode on the Hindu method of calculating, 18.

Education, endowed, James Heywood on, 163.

Education,Univeraity, the Rev.W.Emery on the expenses and social condition of, 193.

Electric cables, with reference to observations on the Malta-Alexandria telegraph, Dr. Ernest Esselbach on, 26.

charge on condensers, Dr. Esselbach

on the determination of the absolute quantity of, 27.

Electro-magnetism, James Croll on the mechanical power of, 24.

Electromotive engine, G. M. Guy on, 27.

Emery (Rev. W.) on the expenses and social condition of University education, 193.

Epiglottis, Dr. George D. Gibb on the normal position of the, as determined by the laryngoscope, 128.

Equations, Rev. R. Harley on a certain class of linear differential, 4.

Esselbach (Dr. Ernest) on the duration of fluorescence, 22; on electric cables, with reference to observations on the Malta-Alexandria telegraph, 26; on an experimental determination of the absolute quantity of electric charge on condensers, 27.

Esson (W.) on the curvature of the margins of leaves with reference to their growth, 3.

Eye, Isaac Ashe on the function of the oblique muscles of the, 120.

Fairbairn (William), his address as President of Section G, 178.

Fellowships, James Heywood on Oxford and Cambridge, 153.

Fens, W. Thorold on the failure of the sluice in, and on the means of securing such sluices against a similar contingency, 186.

Ferrous acid, W. Odling on, 48.

Fisher (Rev. G.) on the numerical mode of estimating educational qualifications, as pursued at the Greenwich Hospital School, 153.

Fisheries, salmon, Thomas Ashworth on the scientific cultivation of, 121.

Fishes, fossil, C. W. Peach on, from the old red sandstone of Caithness, 85.

, Dr. John Davy on the vitality of,

as tested by increase of temperature, 125.

•Flint implements from Amiena, Rev.

T. G. Bonney on some, 70. implements found in a cave called

"The Oyle," nsar Tenbv, South Wales,

Rev. Gilbert N. Smith'on, 95. * instruments from North Devon,

Rev. J. Dingle on specimens of, 72.

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Harran in Padan-Aram, Dr. Beke's
journey to, and thence over Mount
Gilead into the Promised Land, 141.

Harris (W. II.) on the adulteration of
linseed cake with nut-cake, 45.

Harrison (J. Park) on the additional
evidence of the indirect influence of
the moon over the temperature of the
air, 31.

Heart, Isaac Ashe on the function of the
auricular appendix of the, 120.

Heisch (Charles) on a simple method of
taking stereomicro-photographs, 46.

•Heliocentric theory, on the probable
origin of the, 17.

Hennessy (Professor) on some of the
characteristic differences between the
configuration of the surfaces of the
earth and moon, 14; on the relative
amount of sunshine falling on the tor-
rid zone of the earth, 81.

Heterogenesis, James Samuelson on, 119.

Hey wood (James) on endowed education
and Oxford and Cambridge fellow-
ships, 153.

Hill (Edwin) on the prevention of crime,
154.

Hincks (Rev. T.) on the production of
similar medusoids by certain hydroid
olvpes belonging to different genera,
Of.

Hinton (James) on a physiological classi-
fication of animals, 1.30.

Hirst (Prof. T. A.) on the volumes of
pedal surfaces, 5.

Hoskins (Dr. S. Elliott"), table of the ele-
ments of the climate of Guernsey, 140.

Human remains, Thomas Wright on the,
found at Wroxeter, 149.

Hurricane, E. J. Lowe on the, near
Newark, of Mav 7, 1862, 32.

Hyseua-den, W. Boyd Hawkins on the
Wokey Hole, 71.

Hydrocarbons, W. Odling on the syn-
thesis of some, 48.

Hymenoptera, John Lubbock on two
aquatic, 110.

Hypobromous acid, Prof. Eoscoe on, 54.

Income-tax, W. S. Thornton on the, 175.
India, Dr. J. E. Gray on the crocodiles
of, 100.

Industrial classes, J. Buckmaster on the
progress of instruction in elementary
science among the, 150.

Inuline, Dr.RoIleston on the difference of
behaviour exhibited by, and ordinary
starch, when treated with salivary
diastase and other converting agents,

Iron-plated ships, E. E. Allen on the
importance of economizing fuel in,
182.

Japan, Sir R. Alcock on the civilization
of, 136.

Jeffreys (J. Gwyn) on an ancient sea-
bed and beach near Fort William,
Inverness-shire, 73; on a species of
Limopsis, now living in the British
seas, with remarks on the genus, 108;
on a specimen of Astarte comprefsa
having its hinge-teeth reversed, 108.

Jevons (W. S.) on the study of periodic
commercial fluctuations, 157; notice
of a general mathematical theory of
political economv, 158.

Johnston's (H.) invention of an in-
strument for describing geometrical
curves, 3.

Joule (Dr.), the influence of cohesion
in relation to the experiments of, on
the thermal effects of elastic fluids in
motion, 21.

Jukes (J. Beete), his address as President
of Section C, 64.

Keuper bone-breccia of Pendock, Wor-
cestershire, Rev. W. S. Symonds on
scutes of the Labvrinthodon from the,
96.

Kidd (Dr. Charles) on simple syncope
as a coincident in chloroform acci-
dents, 130.

King (Prof. W.) on some objects of
natural history latelv obtained from
the bottom of the Atlantic, 108.

Labouring population, Henry Roberts on
the increased circulation of a pure and
instructive literature adapted to the
capacities and the means of the, 172.

Labvrinthodon, Rev. W. S. Symonds on
scutes of the, from the Keuper bone-
breccia of Pendock, Worcestershire,
96.

L'Afrique ccntrale, exploration dans, de

Serre-l^eone a Alger, par Timbuctu,

par Jules Gerard, 146.
Lancashire, F. Purdv on the pauperism

and mortality of, i65.
Laryngoscope, Dr. George D. Gibb on

the normal position of the epiglottis as

determined by the, 128.
Lassell (William) on a brilliant elliptic

ring in the planetary nebula,^R20°56',

X.P.D. 101° 56'. 14.
Lawes (J. B.) on the effects of different

manures on the mixed herbage of

grass land, 191.

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configuration of tne surfaces of the
earth and, 14.
Moon, J. Park Harrison on the additional
evidence of the indirect influence of
the, over the temperature of the air,
81.

Moore (Charles) on the paleontology of
mineral veins, and on the secondary
age of some mineral veins in the car-
boniferous limestone, 82; contribu-
tions to Australian geology and palae-
ontology, 83.

Mortality of Lancashire, F. Purdy on
the, 165.

Murchison (Sir R. I.), letter from Dr.
Livingstone to, from the River Zam-
besi, 146.

Muscles of the eye, Isaac Ashe on the
function of the oblique, 120.

Nasmyth (J.) on some peculiar features
in the structure of the sun's surface,
16.

Newark, E. J. Lowe on the hurricane
near, of May 7, 1862, 82.

New Guinea and its islands, Alfred R.
Wallace on the trade of the Eastern
Archipelago with, 148.

Newton Stone, Aberdeenshire, decipher-
ment of the Phoenician inscription on
the, by the Rev. Dr. Mill, 147.

New Zealand, Dr. W. Lauder Lindsay
on the toot-poison of, 08.

Nitric acid, Dugald Campbell on the
action of, upon pyrophosphate of mag-
nesia, 37.

Norwich, Rev. J. Crompton on deep or
artesian wells at, 70.

Odling (W.) on the synthesis of some
hydrocarbons, 48; on the nomencla-
ture of organic compounds, 48; on
ferrous acid, 48.

•Ogilby (W.) on the exeentricity of the
earth, and the method of finding the
coordinates of its centre of gravity,
17.

Oil of bay, and other aromatic oils, Dr.

J. H. Gladstone on the essential, 43.
Oils, Dr. Paul on the manufacture of

hydrocarbon, from peat, 50. , essential, J. W. Osborne on the,

from the indigenous vegetation of

Victoria, 48.
Old red sandstone of Caithness, C. W.

Peach on fossil fishes from the, 85.
Old red sandstone of Scotland, &c, W.

Pengelly on the correlation of the

slates and limestones of Devon and

Cornwall with the, 85.

Old red sandstone, upper, J. W. Salter
on the identity of the, with the upper-
most Devonian, and of the middle ud
lower old red with the middle ud
lower Devonian, 92.

Optical instrument which indicates the
relative changes of position of nro
objects which are maintaining inde-
pendent courses. J. M. Menzies on an,
22.

Organic compounds, Dr. Odling on the

nomenclature of, 48.

, Dr. Phipson on a new class of. 50.

Organo-metallic radicals, G. B. Buckton

on the formation of, by substitution,

86.

Osborne (J. W.) on the essential oils
and resins from the indigenous vege-
tation of Victoria, 48; on a photo-
lithographic process, as adopted by
the Government of Victoria for the
publication of maps, 49; observations
made at sea on the motion of the
vessel with reference to sea-sickness,
133.

Otago, New Zealand, W. Lauder Lind-
sav on the geology of the gold-fields

of, 77.

Owen (Prof.) on the characters of the
Aye-Aye, as a test of the Lamarckian
and Darwinian hypothesis of the trans-
mutation and origin of species, 114;
on the zoological significance of the
cerebral and pedial characters of man,

* 116; on the Homologies of the bones
of the head of the Polypterus niloti-
cus, 118.

Ozone, E. J. Lowe's observations on, 46. box, on Lowe's, 46.

Palaeontology, Australian, contributions
to, by Charles Moore, 83.

Paraffin, Dr. Paul on the manufacture
of, from peat, 50.

Parsnip, James Buckman on the enno-
bling of roots, with particular reference
to the, 97.

Paul (Dr.) on the manufacture of hydro-
carbon oils, paraffin, &c, from peat,
50; on the decav and preservation of
stone employed in building, 50.

Pauperism of Lancashire, F. Purdy on
the, 165.

Peach (C. W.) on the fossils of the
boulder-clay in Caithness, 83; on
fossil fishes from the old red sand-
stone of Caithness, 85.

Pearls, their parasitic origin, Robert
Garner on, 126.

Peat, Dr. Paul on the manufacture of

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