صور الصفحة
PDF
النشر الإلكتروني

answer.

Having once formed his opinion, on any subject or circumstance, no reasoning or argument can remove the first impression, and in stating his own views or notions, he is so regardless of the manner, that he often wounds the feelings of his best friends by his overbearing assertions.

I never changed an opinion which I had at first formed, through the reasonings of others, without afterwards repenting of it: not the sixty-fourth part of an inch."

When he was the second Preacher in a Circuit, he loved when at the social table to elevate himself at the expense of his Ministerial Brethren, and cause them to appear illiterate, before a numerons party of friends, by asking them questions which he alone came prepared to

The first time he was invited to a Meeting of the Trustees, after stating "that nearly a year had elapsed before he had received an invitation to attend such a Meeting," he charged the Members, and also the Superintendent, with discussing and settling the affairs of the Society, as well as those of the Trust, and contradicted every person who asserted the contrary.

His desire to be Superintendent in Nottingham was so deeply rooted, that he refused heartily to respond to the unanimous wish and resolution of the March Quarterly Meeting, to travel a second year, though it had passed, and was intended by him to bind the Circuit ; it was renewed at the June Quarterly Meeting, in order to have a better hold on the Conference : yet he still kept the Stewards in suspense, until he found himselt really appointed to that office.

When he became Superintendent all his best friends were glad to see him so delighted. He then told them

[ocr errors]

that " they should be better superintended than they ever had been :" this “better” superintendency soon manifested itself, by giving pain to the members of a whole meeting, constantly obtruding his own sayings and doings, replying to every speaker, and thus checking every opinion which was not in accordance with his own.

If any person ventured to give an opinion contrary to his own, he would instantly call it an “ insult either to kimself or his office,and would do it with that sternDess of purpose for which he was remarkable, and thus silence that individual.

As he conceived himself never to be mistaken, or that he could do no wrong, so he seldom tried to heal the wounded feelings of a christian brother, or to soothe a broken spirit by a kind word : and when a person who loves peace has called upon him, in order to effect a reconciliation, he would abruptly close all further attempts, (except an apology were made to him,) by loudly declaring I would do or say the same thing again to-morrow."

On asking a lady, who had been his intimate friend for many years, " if she approved of his conduct" on a particular occasion, and on being told that she did not, he said, What do you dare to find fault with your superintendent and pastor, then I shall bid you a good evening :" he immediately departed, and has never entered that house, or spoken to that lady since.

Some persons cannot obey rules and usages so well as they can enforce them. They hate Tests, Questions, and Pledges ; " yet when a leader or local preacher had to be admitted into office, he was subjected to a more levere and painful examination than by any former super

intendent, and had publicly to give a promise or pledge that if he should change his views of the doctrines or discipline of Methodism, he should quietly leave the Society, without influencing others, or causing a division amongst its members.

He stated himself “ to be more grossly insulted than he had been for thirty years," by being told “that he was the last man who should coinplain of discourtesy : but he had his revenge on the same evening, by alluding to it in the pulpit.

On another occasion " that he had been insulted both in his person and in his office, in not being invited to a friend's house to meet the preachers from another district," and in twenty minutes afterwards, in the same meeting, charged that friend will giving twelve o'clock suppers amidst sparkling glasses ;" -after such a complaint, of course, this was no insult 10 his friend.

A memorial, couched in most respectful language, and signed by eight or nine Trustees, was presented to him, containing a request, which he would not deign to answer; but after keeping it in his possession several days, carried it to the leaders' meeting, who knew nothing of the affair, without even informing or summoning the petitioners.

In a meeting of Trustees, when a member of fifty years standing in the society wished respectfully to ask him a question in reference to that memorial, although ordered to desist, and clamoured at by the chair, yet was determined to be heard; after silence had been obtained, he was told by the superintendent, “ We will hear you of our clemency, but we shall not give any answer."

On leaving a Trustee Meeting in which there had been some lengthened conversation, he once requested " that his name should not be mentioned in his absence !" -On another occasion, when he had left the room and had descended the stairs in a friend's house, be called out aloud to the Members ihe business of the Trustee Meeting is ended :" clearly implying, that though he was kindly invited, and pressed upon to stay, nothing should be said or done after his departure.

He has declared " that he never wrote anonymous articles for the Press, not even for the Newspapers ;" yet he corrected or rather remodelled a letter for the Nottingham Mercury, against a Tea Meeting which had been held at tbe Coppice, and signed himself a Class Leader."

As though touched by Ithuriel's Spear, he starts at any opposition to his present proceedings; and this has caused him publicly to state, that his opponents sending out their Pamphlets printed at the expense of the Contingent Fund :" pow ke knows this assertion to be erroneous, because, he is well aware this Fund is already £1267 in debt, and that it is under the management of a Committee, composed partly of Laymen, and parily of Ministers, and that its funds cannot be appropriated to any purpose whatever, until that Committee sball meet at the next Conference.

At a Public Meeting wbich he held at Beeston, he stated “ that during the conference no minister had given him eren a smile, or come near to converse with him ;" yet iwo, if not more of his Brethren went to him, purparsely to urge him to yield to the rules and usages of the Connexion, but he obstinately refused. It may be

&G

are

surprising to those who know him well, how they dared to give him advice, for he always thought himself wiser than any of his teachers.

He has announced “his intention of going from North to South to state his case," for his own private purposes; with one hand, as it were, to throw firebrands amongst the ignorant who do not know the man, and at the same time to preach the Gospel of the glorious God.

“ To good and evil equal bent,
I'm now a sinner, now a saini."
O'er every earthly living thing
I would be Lord, I would be King,
I'd make the whole five-hundred bow,

I'd bring the proud oppressors low !" Sympathy for the oppressed, is the characteristic of a Briton, and especially of a sincere Christian,-but when the applicant has lived amongst us, and played the Pope, in every place where he has had the power--and thus has proved it by his practice; can bear to see no one above him without envy, and few beneath him without domination--to sympathize and contribute to the support of such a man, is nothing less than hiring a "religious Incendiary" to set on fire the Church of God; to scatter, divide, and destroy, merely to satisfy his own private revenge and advantage, while professing at the same time to aim at religious liberty !!

The principles which he is inculcating to those who will listen to him, are full of the most baneful and poisonous effects :

"he entreals them to meet in class, to attend the public and private services of religion as usual,with hearts full of prejudice, like his own, and implanted into theirs by himself, still to remain Members of the Church,"-well knowing that this evil spirit

« السابقةمتابعة »