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nesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin that doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, looking unto Jesus.”. Looking unto Jesus! Here is the crowning encouragement. Let it cheer and sustain you in all your labors, and amid all your discouragements. Looking untu Jesus as your advocate, presenting your humble prayers perfumed with the incense of his own sacrifice, and strength. ened by his own availing intercession. Looking unto Jesus as the bestower of the Comforter, that almighty helper, whose aid is the pledge of our complete success. Looking unto Jesus as head over all things to the Church ; as enlisted with you, there. fore, to subdue all things to himself. With his eye turned upward to such a Saviour, how can a Christian faint or be dis. heartened ? There is not a more appropriate watchword, or a more effectual stimulus to Christiau effort and prayer, than looking unto Jesus.

It appears then, my brethren, that, furnished as we are with such auxiliaries and encouragements, we can accomplish far more for the salvation of men and the honor of God than we are accomplishing, more than we ever have accomplished, more than has ever been accomplished, at least since apostolic days. It must be so. The promise of Christ proves it so. The world will never be converted, if it is not so. Zion must put on new strength, and her march must be attended with more rapid success, or the day of millennial glory will never dawn upon our world. Not that any new agencies are to be employed, or any new measures devised. We have all the resources, all the facilities, all the instruments that we shall ever have, and all that we need. But in those same old agencies, the preaching of the gospel, prayer, holy example, Christian liberality, zeal, self-denial, there is a wonder-working power which we have not yet developed nor discovered. It is latent. If we will but employ these agencies as we ought-do our best with themwe shall be astonished at our success; and the miracles of primitive times will be forgotten, amid the grander miracles of converting grace which we shall witness. My brethren, let us make the experiment, and see what will be the result. Let us bring all these tithes into the store house-labor, self-denial, faith, prayer—and see what miracles of power and glory will be wrought among us. Let us do it for the sake of him who has intrusted these resources to our use. Let us do it for the multitudes around us, and for a world perishing in sin. Let us do it for our own spiritual profit, and for that crown of glory that fadeth not away.

company our text : "I will pray the Father for you." And what wonder that, with such an interce-sor, the Christian should be so mighty in his Master's service? The promise is, “Whatsoever ye shall ask in my name, that will I do." What though we are weak and erring? What though our prayers are so imperfect? What though we lift to heaven hands all stained with sin? We have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous, whom the Father heareth always; and with such a friend at court, our cause is safe. The resources of Omnipotence are placed at our disposal, and we are strong in the Lord, and in the power of his might.

3. Christ's followers are enabled to do greater works than his, through the aid of the Holy Spirit, which he hus given them.

" It is expedient for you that I go away ; for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you." Mark these words : " It is expedient for you. not for me only, but for you. It is better for you that I should go. I leave you for your good. I leave you that you may have in my stead the Holy Ghost, whose presence will be more available to you than mine. The Comforter could not properly commence his peculiar work till the atonement was completed, and Christ had left the world. Great, then, as was the value of Christ's so ciety to his followers, it was expedient that he should leave them, and that the Spirit should come in his stead. They gained greatly by the exchange, for, the moment the Spirit came, they commenced their "greater works." Truth was armed with new power ; Satan fell as lightning from heaven ; the temples of Paganism were overthrown; her oracles became dumb ; and the stone helvo out of the mountain without hands commenced growing to that great mountain which shall yet fill the whole earth.

We think it would be a prerious privilege, if we could have the Siviour walking our streets as once he walked the streets of Juder; if we could worship with him in the sanctuary, and in the place of social praver ; if he could enter our dwellings and bow with is at the family altar ; if we could listen to his coun-els and instructions, and receive his gracious benediction. But no: if the Spirit must leave us. If we can have but one, let us hive the blessed Comforter, in whose presence and power is the only hope of this lost world. He it is that cheers the fainting heart, that confirms the tottering steps, that wipes the weeping eve, that guides the wandering feet. He it is that gives to the Word of God its conquering power, and melts before it the stoutest heart into penitence and love. Oh! how precious is this, the Saviour's parting gift! He is indeed a Comforter--the Comforter. In him is our strength, our hope, our victory.

4. “ Greater works than these shall ye do, because I Father.” This is true again, because, when Christ went to his

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Father, he was exalted to the headship and kingship of his Church. This relationship is thus described in the glowing language of Paul: "And set him at bis own right hand in the heavenly places, far above all principality, and power, and might, and dominion, and every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come ; and bath put all things under his feet, and gave him to be the head over all things to the church, which is his body, the fullness of him that filleth all in all.”

Christ then is our head ; we act as his agents ; our works are bis works. But he works now, not as when he was on earth, as a man clothed with human weakness and infirmity, but as a throned and reigning King. The Father has said to him: “Sit thou on my right hand until I make thine enemies thy footstool." “ He must reign until he hath put all enemies under bis feet." Through us, his humble followers, this conquest is to be achieved. It is for this that he has given us the power of doing these

greater works." For this, he enables one to chase a thousand, and two to put ten thousand to flight. For this he has given us the Church, with all its mighty agencies of good. For this, he has given us the sword of the Spirit, which is the Word of God. For this, he has given us prayer, the key of Heaven's exhaustless treasury. For this, the heavenly Dove is sent to hover over us, and descend with converting and sanctifying power upon the hearts of men. For this, angels are ministering spirits, aiding us in our work. Oh! it is the greatest, the most glorious work ever undertaken in our world. We, the humble followers of Christ, have it to do; and with his promised help we shall do it. Our success is certain ; our victory is sure. “I, the Lord will hasten it in bis time."

Now, if Christ's followers are invested with such powers, then. 1st. It is plainly onr fault that so little is accomplished. When the promise in our text began to be fulfilled on the day of Pentecost, when one sermon was i he instrument of three thousand immediate conversions, and when a few more added two thousand to this number, it must have seemed to those who beheld those wonderful achievements of the Galilean fishermen, that nothing could prevent the speedy, universal triumph of the gospel. Within thirty years from that time, one might have said, in surveying their labors, "At this rate, not two centuries will elapse, before the whole world will be converted to Christ!" But, oh! how different has been the result! Eighteen cen. turies have poured their mighty tide of immortal souls into the gulf of despair, and the Prince of this world has the immense majority yet. During half of this tiine the Church has been in a dead sleep. And since she was awakened by the morning clarion of the Reformation, how slow has been her march! With the resources of the reigning Saviour and the converting Spirit in her hand, how little has she done! Here and there one, conscious of his power, or of God's power in him, has done battle gloriously in this cause; but, as a whole, how little has the Church accomplished! How little is she doing now! Now and then a scattered few in the ranks arouse themselves, and strive manfully for a season, and hundreds flock to the standard of the cross, showing what "mighty works" they can do if they will; but then they drop to sleep again, and the enemy prevails.

Look at the Church at the present moment. She has wealth, talent, numbers, the Saviour's cominission and instructions, the Spirit's presence and aid, --all that Christ has promised, all she will ever have ; and yet, is she fulfilling her mission ? Is she doing her work? Is she hastening to take possession of the earth for her King ? No! she is standing nearly still. In some portions of the field she is even going backward, and the enemy is gaining ground upon her. Shame, shaine on the soldiers who retreat, with such a Leader and in such a cause! Why should it be so? Why should the head clad with the helmet of salvation droop and nod at the post of duty ? Why should the hands that bear the shield of fauth hang down in apathy? Why should the feet shod with the preparation of the gospel retreat before its foes ? Are we not faithless to our Leader, and recreant to our high trust? How can the Saviour ever fulfill his glorious design with such followers? Were it not for his immut ble promise, we should expect that he would drive us all from the field, and from the very stones raise up children uvto Abraham. Oh! it is a fearful thing to enjoy such privileges, to possess such resources, to be intrusted with such interests, and yet to be accomplishing so little for Christ and a dying world i

Finally, In the promise of Christ to his followers, they may find unfailing ground of encouragement.

Amid the dust and heat of the conflict in the Church militant, we are too apt to look down to earth, and, seeing so many enemies, and difficulties, and hardships, so much work to be done, and so few coming to our help, to become discouraged, and faint. This we must not do. And that we may not do it, we should look up-up to the throne of our risen and exalted Siviour, our Captain, our Intercessor, our conquering. King. This the great apostle did, and it nerved him anew for his conflict. This le eshorts others to do, and it will have the same effect upon them. After enumerating that glorious constellation of departed worthies, who, from their high seats, are witnesses of our conflict,-- Abel, Enoch, Noah, Abraham, Isaac, Jacoli, Joseph, Moses, Rahab, Gideon, Barek, Samson, Jephthah, David, Sanuel, and the prophets, he exclaims : “Wherefore, seeing we are compassed about with so great a cloud of wit. nesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin that doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, looking unto Jesus.". Looking unto Jesus! Here is the crowning encouragement. Let it cheer and sustain you in all your labors, and amid all your discouragements. Looking unto Jesus as your advocate, presenting your humble prayers perfumed with the incense of his own sacrifice, and strengthened by his own availing intercession. Looking unto Jesus as the bestower of the Comforter, that almighty helper, whose aid is the pledge of our complete success. Looking unto Jesus as head over all things to the Church ; as enlisted with you, therefore, to subdue all things to himself. With his eye turned up. ward to such a Saviour, how can a Christian faint or be dis. heartened ? There is not a more appropriate watchword, or a more effectual stimulus to Christian effort and prayer, than looking unto Jesus.

It appears then, my brethren, that, furnished as we are with such auxiliaries and encouragements, we can accomplish far more for the salvation of men and the honor of God than we are accomplishing, more than we ever have accomplished, more than has ever been accomplished, at least since apostolic days. It must be so. The promise of Christ proves it so. The world will never be converted, if it is not so. Zion must put on new strength, and her march must be attended with more rapid success, or the day of millennial glory will never dawn upon our world. Not that any new agencies are to be employed, or any new measures devised. We have all the resources, all the facilities, all the instruments that we shall ever have, and all that we need. But in those same old agencies, the preaching of the gospel, prayer, holy example, Christian liberality, zeal, self-denial

, there is a wonder-working power which we have not yet developed nor discovered. It is latent. If we will but employ these agencies as we ought-do our best with themwe shall be astonished at our success; and the miracles of primitive times will be forgotten, amid the grander miracles of converting grace which we shall witness. My brethren, let us make the experiment, and see what will be the result. Let us bring all these tithes into the store house--labor, self-denial, faith, prayer—and see what miracles of power and glory will be wrought among us.

Let us do it for the sake of him who has intrusted these resources to our use. Let us do it for the multitudes around us, and for a world perishing in sin. Let us do it for our own spiritual profit, and for that crown of glory that fadeth not away.

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