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He has great confidence in the favourable reception of this work, from the circumstance, that it will present to the American youth a selection of pieces, a portion of which is from American writers, none of this class being in the English Reader, the book most generally in use in the schools of this country; and pride for the literary reputation of our own country, should, it would seem, dictate to us the propriety of inserting in the books of our primary schools, specimens of our own literature.

Believing, that no advantage could possibly arise from a methodical arrangement of the lessons, he has preferred variety to system, so that the reader will have a number of subjects for each week's reading; and, he has spared no pains to render the work, in all respects, worthy of the generous patronage which a liberal publick has bestowed on his former publications.

LYMAN COBB, New York, May 15, 1832,

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. The Poisoned Valley,

. Falls of the Montmorency,

. The Elder's Funeral, -

. On the Death of a Brother,

. Grandeur and Moral Interest

. The Importance of a

. A Sister's Love, -

§:... .

. Liberty and Slave -

. May #. ry. -

. The Happy Man, -

. Women

. The Wonders of Nature,

Source of Misery to its

Possessor, - - -

. Self-knowledge, - - - 2552.

. The Sleep of the Brave, - 27|53.

. Home, - - - - 28||54.

. The Liberty of the Press, - 29||55.

. Wisdom, - - - - 31

. Practical Religion, - - ib.156.

. Rolla's Address to the Peru- 57.

vians, - - - -

. Genius, - - - - 33 8

Ancient Babylon, ... - -

of American Antiquities,

ood

Education, - -

olin and Im.

prove Society," - - 5

59.71.

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Ilesson. Page. Lesson. Page,
72. Schemes of Life often Illu- 107. Summer Morning, - - 162
sory, - - - - - 111 108. Nothing Formed in Vain, 163

73. D. of Prince William, 114||109. Description of Arabia, - 164

#4. He Never Smiled Again, ib|110. Trust in the Care of Provi-

75. Attraction, - - - 115 dence Recommended, - 165

76. America, - - - 118||111. The Respectaueto all Men, 167

77. The Torrid and Frigid 112. Virtue the only True Hap-

Zones, - - - - - 119 iness, - - - - 168

78. Religion, - - - 120.113. The Mutual Relation be-

79. Rural Charms, - - 121 tween Sleep and Night, ib.

80. Washington's Love to his 114. National Glory, - - 170
Mcther, - * - 122||115. A Character of Napoleon

81. Portrait of a Worldly Bonaparte, down to the pe-

Woman, - - - 123 riod of his Exile to Elba, 171

82. Elegy to Pity, - - 126||116. Account of the Quicksilver

83. Lines on the Death of my Mines in Idria, in Car-

much loved Infant, - 127 miola, Germany, - - 174

84. The Land of our Birth, - 128||117. A Mother to her Sleeping

85. The Dying Man to his Infant, - - - - - 178

Watch, - - - 129||118. Extract from an Oration

86. The Journey of a Day. on the Virtues of General

A Picture of Human Washington, pronounced

Life, - - - - 130 the 8th of February, 1800, 179

87. Steam-boats on the Mis- 119. On Plants, - - - 180

sissippi, - -, - 133||120. Importance of Science to a

88. Advantages of Studying Practical Mechanick, - 182

History, - - - 135||121. On Early Rising, - - 184

89. Diversity in the Human 122. A West Indian Land-

Character, - - - 13 scape, - - - - - - 185

90. The Sleepers, - - - - 139||123. Supposed Speech of John
91. Cypress Swamps of the ams in favour of the
ississippi, - - - 140 Declaration of Independ-

92. On Visiting a Scene of ence, - - - - 187

Childhood, - - - 14: . The Western Emigrant, 189

93. The Old Man's Funeral, 143||125. Notch in the White Mount-

94. Influence of the Dead on ains, - - - - 191

the Living, - - - 144||126. Government of the People, 1:5

95. Catharina, Emperess of . Political Economy, - - 196

Russia, - - - . Friendship, - - - 197

96 May, - - - - 148||129. The Influence of an Early

97. The Autumn Evening, - 149 Taste for Reading, - 198

98. Cultivation of Moral Taste, I . Alliance between Religion

99. The Hermit, - - - I and liberty, - -

100. Spirit of Freedom, - - 1 . Providence Windicated in

101. Character of a Christian the Present State of Man, 202

- Mother, -, - . - 154||132. Speech of a Creek Indian,
102. Intelligence of the People in a Council of his Nation,
a Means of Safety to the against the use of Spir-

- Government, - - 15 ituous Liquors, - - 203

103. Landing of the Pilgrim . Patience under Provoca-
Fathers, - " - - 15 tions, our Interest as well

104. The Hypocrite, - - 158||, ... as Duty, - - - 205

105. Mental Improvement, - 159||134. Declaration of Independ-

106. The broken-heartedwoman, 1 ence, - - - - 206

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COBB'S SE QUEL.

LESSON I.
Fducation.

1. What a fine acquirement; how productive of good, and how replete with excellence and importance to man is education. It is one of the brightest ornaments which can gild his passage through this world, or which can make him appear to any advantage in it. It places within his reach all those comforts and pleasures which, as man, he can possibly enjoy, and affords him an opportunity of dissipating the clouds of ignoi. and thereby contributing to the welfare of his fellow

elings.

oucation leads man from the path of ignorance into that of knowledge, guides his reason and understanding, restrains and acts as a rein to his passions, by keeping them within all due and proper bounds. It teaches him to contemn and despise the meanness of the ignorant; to look down with indignation upon their presumption and self-sufficiency; to treat with cool indifference the low and sordid motives by which they are generally actuated, and which characterize their every action.

3. Education is an acquisition far more valuable than riches. The man of wealth is liable, through the vicissitudes and changes of fortune, to lose it, and to be reduced to poverty; but he who is endowed with, and possesses education, will never be deserted by it. It will attend him as well in adversity as in prosperity; it will follow him from the mansion to the hovel; j accompany him when mixing among the circles of the fashionable and great, and descend with him to the habitations of penury and distress.

4. Even should he be consigned to a dungeon, by the lawless hand of oppression, there, also, will it be his companion, 8 - . . . . . . . cobb's sequEL. cheering and consoling him, affording him fortitude to bear his haplessfadeswith patience aid resignation. In whatever station of life-man is plated; if he has once obtained education it will always attend him, whether in affluence or poverty, greatness or obscurity. It will accompany him along the airy o of youth, and will retire with him beneath the evening shade of old age, cheering and enlivening him, and rendering the last stage of his existence less irksome and tedicus than it otherwise would be. 5. Education may be ranked as one of the most valuable gifts which man can have bestowed upon him; without it he passes through life almost unnoticed and disregarded; and not having a mind sufficiently bright to guide him, is subject to ridicule, and is obliged, and necessitated to be wholly influenced and directed, and governed by those who have drank of, and whose minds have been well watered and cultivated by the “Pierian Spring.” 6. Under the influence of education, civilization is introduced, by which governments have been formed, and laws enacted for the purpose of regulating and ruling the actions of men; a social and regular intercourse established between mankind, which has a tendency to render them of mutual and reciprocal benefit to each other. 7. What would the world be without civilization ? It would be without regularity; it would present a sickening picture of confusion and tumult, disorder and irregularity; some of the worst and most pernicious passions j be gratified without shame or restraint; some of the most heinous and glarin crimes would be committed with impunity; dark ignorance, with all its tendencies and destructive consequences, would prevail. 8. Without civilization man would be sunk in the lowest depths of barbarism; he would be upon a level with the brute creation. It is certain that through the medium of education, civilization is effected, for without the former, the latter could not be properly appreciated. Surely an ignorant man could not enumerate the many benefits and blessings consequent to, and attendant on a civilized state, nor point out the many disadvantages and inconveniences which follow in the train of an uncivilized one. 9. It is, therefore, the man of education, and only him, who can point out to, and bring before the view of his uncivilized brother, the many advantages and comforts arising out of, and flowing from humanized society; it is only him who can make the inhabitant of the forest fully sensible of the numerous dangers and difficulties to which his mode of life is liable.

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