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as he could--and for mine, I walked directly into the house.

The family confifted of an old grey-headed man and his wife, with five or fix sons and sons-in-law, and their several wives, and a joyous genealogy out of them.

They were all fitting down together to their lentilsoup; a large wheaten loaf was in the middle of the table; and a flagon of wine at each end of it promised joy through the stages of the repast—'twas a feast of love.

The old man rose up to meet me, and with a respecte ful cordiality would have me sit down at the table: my heart was set down the moment I entered the room; so I sat down at once like a son of the family; and to in. vest myself in the character as speedily as I could, I instantly borrowed the old man's knife, and taking up the loaf, cut myself a hearty luncheon; and as I did it, I saw a testimony in every eye, not only ofan honeft wel. come, but of a welcome mix'd with thanks that I had not seem'd to doubt it.

Was it this: or tell me, Nature, what else it was that made this morsel so sweet--and to what magic I owe it, that the draught I took of their flagon was so delicious with it, that they remain upon my palate to this hour?

If the fupper was to my taste-the grace which fol . lowed was much more so.

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into them. I see him meet the pensive flade of his foro faken Dido-and wish to recognize it-I see the injured spirit wave her head, and turn off filent from the author of her miseries and dishonours- I lose the feelings of myself in her's and those affections which were wont to make me mourn for her when I was at school.

Surely this is not walking in a vain sbadow nor does man disquiet himself in vain by ithe oftener does fo in trusting the iffue of his commotions to reason only I can safely say for myself, I was never able to conquer any one single bad sensation in my heart so decisively, as by beating up as fast as I could for some kindly and gentle senfation to fight it upon its own ground.

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SENT. JOURNEY, P. 165.

LE DIMANCHE.

IT

was Sunday; and when Le Fleur came in the

morning, with my coffee and roll and butter, he had got himself so gallantly arrayed, I scarce knew bim.

I had covenanted at Montreiul to give him a new hat with a Glver button and loop, and four Louisd'ors pour s'adoniser, when we got to Paris; and the poor fellow, to do him justice, had done wonders with it.

He had bought a bright, clean, good scarlet coat, and a pair of breeches of the same. They were not a crown worse, he said, for the wearing—I wish'd him hang'd for telling me. They look'd so fresh, that I knew the thing could not be done, yet I would rather have imposed upon my fancy, with thinking I had bought them new for the fellow, than that they had come out of the Rue de Fripperie.

This is a nicety which makes not the heart fore at Paris.

He had purchased moreover a handsome blue satin waistcoat, fancifully enough embroidered this was indeed something the worse for the service it had done, buit 'twas clean scour'dmthe gold had been touch'd up, and upon the whole was rather showy than otherwise and as the blue was not violent, it suited with the coat and breeches very well: he had squeez'd out of the money, moreover, a new bag and solitaire; and had infifted with the Frippier upon a gold pair of garters to his breeches knees-He had purchafed muffin ruffles, bien bordées, with four livres of his own money,--and a pair of white silk stockings, for five more and, to top all, nature had given him a handfome figure, without costing him a fous.

He entered the room thus set off, with his hair dreft in the first style, and with a handsome bouquet in his breaft-in a word, there was that look of festivity in every thing about him, which at once put me in mind it was Sunday—and, by combating both together, it instantly struck me, that the favour he wifh'd to ads

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me the night before, was to spend the day as every one in Paris spent it besides. I had scarce made the conjecture, when La Fleur, with infinite humility, but with a look of trust, as if I should not refuse him, begged I would grant him the day, pour faire le galant vis-à-vis de fa Maîtrele.

Now it was the very thing I intended to do myself vis-à-vis Madame de R***--I had retained the remise. on purpose for it, and it would not have mortified my vanity to have had a servant so well dress'd as La, Fleur was, to have got up behind it: I never could have worse fpared him. But we must feel, not argue in these embarrassments

the fons and daughters of service part with Liberty, but not with Nature, in their contracts; they are fleth and blood, and have their little vanities and wishes in the midst of the house of bondage, as well as their task-masters--no doubt, they have set their self-denials at a price--and their expectations are so unreasonable, that I would often disappoint them, but that their condition puts it so much in my power to do it.

Behold, Bebold, I am thy fervant--difarms me at once of the powers of a master.

Thou shalt go, La Fleur ! said I.

And what mistress, La Fleur! said I, canst thon have picked up in so little a time at Paris ? La Fleur laid his hand upon his breast, and said 'twas a petite demoiselle at M nsieur le Comte de B****'s--La Fleur had a heart made for society; and, to speak the truth

) of him, let as few occasions flip him as his masterso that, fome how or other, but how-Heaven knows he had connected himself with the demoiselle upon the landing of the stair-case, during the time I was taken up with my passport; and as there was time enough for me to win the Count to my interest, La Fleur had contrived to make it do to win the maid to his.--The family, it seems, was to be at Paris that day; and he had made a party with her, and two or three more of the Count's household upon the Loulevards

Happy people! that once a week at least are sure to lay down all your cares together, and dance and fing, and sport away the weights of grievance, which bow down the spirit of other nations to the earth.

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SENT. JOURNEY, P. 190:

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A

POOR Monk of the order of St.Francis came

into the room to beg something for his cons vent. No man cares to have his virtues the sport of contingencies or one man may be generous as another man is puissant-sed, non quoad hanc or be it as it may--for there is no regular reasoning upon the

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