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tophy, I fhall behold him, as he inspects the lackered plate, twice taking his spectacles from off his nose, to wipe away the dew which nature had thed upon them-when I see him cast the rosemary with an air of disconfolation, which cries through my ears, Toby! in what corner of the world-fhall I seek thy fellow.

-Gracious powers! which erst have opened the tips of the dumb in his distress, and made the tongue of the stammerer speak plain--when I shall arrive at this dreaded page, deal not with me, then, with a ftinted hand.

T. 'SHANDY, VOL. III. C. 68.

PLEASURES OF

OBSERVATION AND STUDY.

-WHAT
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be grasped within this little span of life, hy him who interests his heart in every thing, and who, having eyes to see what time and chance are, perpetually holding out to him as he journeyeth on his way, misses nothing he can fairly lay his hands

on!

-If this won't turn out something--another will no matterus an essay upon human nature

I get

my labour for my pains--'tis enough-the pleasure of the experiment has kept my senses, and the best part of my blood awake, and laid the gross to sleep.

I pity the man who can travel from Dan to Beerfheba, and cry, 'Tis all barren-And so it is; and so is all the world to him who will not cultivate the fruits it offers. I declare, said I, clapping my hands cheerily together, that were I in a desart, I would find out wherewith in to call forth

my

affections If I could do no better, I would faften them upon some sweet myrtle, or seek some melancholy cypress to connect myself to-I would court their fhade, and greet them kindly for their protection—I would cut my name upon them, and swear they were the loveliest trees throughout the desart: if their leaves withered, I would teach myself to mourn, and when they re. joiced, I would rejoice along with them.

SEN'T. JOURNEY, P. 51.

FEELING AND BENEFICENCE.

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AS it Mackay's regiment, quoth my uncle

Toby, where the poor grenadier was so unmercifully whipp'd at Bruges about the ducats ? o Chrift! he was innocent! cried Trim, with a deep sigh.—And he was whipp’d, may it please your honour, almost to death's door.—They had better have shot him outright, as he begged, and he had

gone dire&tly to heaven, for he was as innocent as your honour. I thank thee, Trim, quoth my uncle Toby. I never think of his, continued Trim, and my poor brother Tom's misfortunes, for we were all three school-fellows, but I cry like a coward. - Tears are no proof of cowardice, Trim; I drop them ofttimes myself, cried my, uncle Toby—I know your honour does, replied Trim, and so am not ashamed of it myself.--But to think, may it please your honour, continued Trimmd tear stealing into the corner of his eye as he spoke to think of two vir. tuous lads, with hearts as warm in their bodies, and as honeft as God could make them the children of honest people, going forth with gallant spirits to seek their fortunes in the world--and fall into such evils ! poor Tom! to be tortured upon a rack for nothingbut marrying a Jeru's widow who fold sausages honest Dick Johnson's soul to be scourged out of his body, for the ducats another man put in his knapsack! -O!--these are misfortunes, cried Trim, pulling out his handkerchief, these are misfortunes, --- may it pleafe your honour, worth laying down and crying

over.

Twould be a pity, Trim, quoth my uncle Toby, thou should'st ever feel sorrow of thy own, thou feelest it so tenderly for others. Alack-a-day, replied the Corporal, brightening up his face--your honour knows I have neither wife or child. I can have no forrows in this world. As few as any mang teplied my uncle Toby; nor can I see how a fellow

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of thy light heart can suffer, but from the distrefs of poverty in thy old age-when thou art past all fervices, Trim, -and hast outlived thy friends. An't please your honour, never fear, replied Trim, cheerily. -But I would have thee never fear, Trim, replied my uncle Toby; and therefore, continued my uncle Toby, throwing down his crutch, and getting upon his legs as he uttered the word therefore-in recompence, Trim, of thy long fidelity to me, and that goodness of thy heart I have had such proofs of whilst thy master is worth a fhilling thou shalt never ask elsewhere, Trim, for a penny. Trim attempted to thank my uncle Toby, but had not power tears trickled down his cheeks faster than he could wipe them off-he laid his hands upon his breastmade a bow to the ground, and shut the door.

-I have left Trim my bowling-green, cried my uncle Toby-My father smiled I have left him moreover, a pension, continued my uncle Toby-My father

looked grave.

T. SHANDY, VOL. II. C. 39.

SLAVERY.

CON

ONSIDER flavery, what it is,--how bitter a

draught, and how many millions have been made to drink it ;which, if it can poison all earthly happiness when exercised barely upon our bodies,

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what must it be, when it comprehends both the Mavery of body and mind? To conceive this, look into the history of the Romish church and her tyrants (or rather executioners), who seem to have taken pleasure in the pangs and convulsions of their fellow-creatures. -Examine the Inquisition, hear the melancholy notes founded in every cell.--Confider the anguish of mock-trials, and the exquisite tortures consequent thereupon, mercilessly inflicted upon the unfortunate, where the racked and weary soul has so often wished to take its leave,--but cruelly not suffered to depart

Consider how many of these helpless wretches have been hauled from thence, in all periods of this tyrannic ufurpation, to undergo the maffacres and fames to which a false and bloody religion has cons demned them.

-Let us behold him in another light

If we consider man as a creature full of wants and necessities (whether real or imaginary), which he is not able to supply of himfelf, what a train of disappointă ments, vexations, and dependances are to be seen issuing from thence to perplex and make his way una easy !

-How many joftlings and hard struggles do we undergo in making our way in the world !-How barbaroully held back !-How often and bafely overthrown, in aiming only at getting bread !--How many of us never attain it at least not comfortably, but from various unknown caufeseat it all our lives long in bitterness !

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