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SELFISHNESS AND MEANNESS.

THAT there is felbhness and meanness enough

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of the world, to hurt the credit of the other part of it, is what I shall not dispute against; but to judge of the whole from this bad sample, and because one man is plotting, and artful in his nature ;-_or, a second openly makes his pleasure or his profit the whole centre of all his designs ;-or, because a third strait-hearted wretch fits confined within himself,-feels no misfortunes, but those which touch himself; to involve the whole race without mercy under such detested characters, is a conclusion as false as it is pernicious; and were it in general to gain credit, could serve no end, but the rooting out of our nature all that is generous, and planting in the stead of it such an aversion to each other, as must untie the bands of society, and rob us of one of the greatest pleasures of it, the mutual com munications of kind offices; and by poisoning the fountain, rendering every thing suspected that hows, through it.

SERM. VII, P. 137.

THE

VICE NOT WITHOUT USE.
HE lives of bad men are not without use,

and whenever such a one is drawn, not with a corrupt view to be admired ---but on purpose to be

detefted_it must excite such a horror against vice, as will strike indirectly the same good impression. And though it is painful to the laft degree to paint a man in the shades, which his vices have cast upon him,yet when it serves this end, it carries its own excuse with it.

ŠERM. IX. P. 173.

YORICK'S OPINION OF GRAVITY.,

S
OMETIMES, in his wild way of talking, he

would say, that gravity was an arrant scoundrel; and he would add, of the most dangerous kind too, -because a fly one; and that he verily believed, more honest, well-meaning people were bubbled out of their goods and money by it in one twelveinonth, than by pocket-picking and shop-lifting in seven. In the naked temper which a merry heart discovered, he would say, there was no danger,—but to itself:--whereas the very essence of gravity was design, and confequently deceit; 'twas a taught" trick to gain credit of the world for more sense and knowledge than a man was worth; and that, with all its pretenfions, it was no better," but often worse, than what a French wit had long ago defined it, viz. -A myo Sterious carriage of the body to cover the defects of the mind. IN DI

T. SHANDY, VOL. 1. c. 2. 91!0! 102 103

I.

THE INTERRUPTION.

WHE

"HEN

my

father received the letter which brought him the melancholy account of my brother Bobby's death, he was busy calculating the expence of his riding post from Calais to Paris, and so on to Lyons.

'Twas a most inauspicious journey; my father having had every foot of it to travel over again, and his calculation to begin afresh, when he had almost got to the end of it, by Obadiah's opening the door, to acquajnt him the family was out of yeast-and to ask whether he might not take the great coach-horfe early in the morning and ride in search of some. With all my heart, Obadiah, faid my father. (pursuing his journey)—take the coach-horse, and welcome. But he wants a fhoe, poor creature ! said Obadiah. Poor creature ! said my uncle Toby, vibrating the note back again, like a string in unison. Then ride the Scotch horse, quoth my father hastily-He cannot bear a saddle upon his back, quoth Obadiah, for the whole world. The devil's in that horfe; then take PATRIOT, cried.

l.my father; and shut the door.TRIOT is fold, said Obadiah. Here's for you! cried my father, making a pause, and looking in my uncle Toby's face, as if the thing had not been a matter of fact.--Your worship ordered me to sell him last April, faid Obadiab.-Then go on foot for your pains, cried

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