The Scottish Review: A Quarterly Journal of Social Progress and General Literature, المجلد 1

الغلاف الأمامي
Scottish Temperance League, 1853
 

ما يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة

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مقاطع مشهورة

الصفحة 199 - And posts, like the commandment of a king, Sans check, to good and bad: But when the planets, In evil mixture, to disorder wander, What plagues, and what portents ! what mutiny ! What raging of the sea ! shaking of earth ! Commotion in the winds ! frights, changes, horrors, Divert and crack, rend and deracinate The unity and married calm of states | Quite from their fixture!
الصفحة 126 - I have of late (but, wherefore, I know not) lost all my mirth, foregone all custom of exercises : and, indeed, it goes so heavily with my disposition, that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you — this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire — why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours.
الصفحة 321 - ... prayer. His sense of religion stirs through his whole being. In the fields, in the town: looking at the birds in the trees: at the children in the streets: in the morning or in the moonlight: over his books in his own room: in a happy party at a country merrymaking or a town assembly, good-will and peace to God's creatures, and love and awe of Him who made them, fill his pure heart and shine from his kind face. If Swift's life was the most wretched, I think Addison's was one of the most enviable....
الصفحة 327 - REMOTE, unfriended, melancholy, slow — Or by the lazy Scheldt or wandering Po, Or onward where the rude Carinthian boor Against the houseless stranger shuts the door, Or where Campania's plain forsaken lies A weary waste expanding to the skies — Where'er I roam, whatever realms to see, My heart...
الصفحة 102 - With no restraint, but such as springs From quick and eager visitings Of thoughts that lie beyond the reach Of thy few words of English speech: A bondage sweetly brooked, a strife That gives thy gestures grace and life! So have I, not unmoved in mind, Seen birds of tempest-loving kind — Thus beating up against the wind.
الصفحة 185 - HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE; with an OUTLINE of the ORIGIN- and GROWTH of the ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Illustrated by EXTRACTS. For Schools and Private STUDENTS. By WILLIAM SPALDING, AM, Professor of Logic, Rhetoric, and Metaphysics, in the University of St Andrews. Continued to 1870. 3s. 6d. Spectator...
الصفحة 99 - From scenes like these old Scotia's grandeur springs, That makes her loved at home, revered abroad; Princes and lords are but the breath of kings; "An honest man's the noblest work. of God;" And certes, in fair Virtue's heavenly road, The cottage leaves the palace far behind.
الصفحة 320 - We view the world with our own eyes, each of us, and we make from within us the world we see. A weary heart gets no gladness out of sunshine ; a selfish man is sceptical about friendship, as a man with no ear doesn't care for music.
الصفحة 321 - Sabbath comes over that man's mind : and his face lights up from it with a glory of thanks and prayer. His sense of religion stirs through his whole being. In the fields, in the town : looking at the birds in the trees : at the children in the streets : in the morning or in the moonlight : over his books in his own room : in a happy party at a country merry-making or a town assembly, goodwill and peace to God's creatures, and love and awe of Him who made them, fill his pure heart and shine from his...
الصفحة 214 - ... without pluming himself upon his brotherly nobleness as a virtue, or seeking to repay himself (as some uneasy martyrs do) by small instalments of long repining, — but that he carried the spirit of the hour in which he first knew and took his course, to his last.

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