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CONTENTS.

FASK

Account of the Museum of National Antiquities, Athens .. .. xi

GENERAL INTRODUCTION.

«. Interest of Greek Travel; Mode of Travelling, &c 1

I. Routes from England to Greece .. .. .. .. .. .. 4

e. Requisites before Starting; Luggage, Clothes, Presents, Letters of

Introduction, Money, Passports, Ate. .. .. .. .. .. 5

i. Climate, and Seasons for Travelling .. .. .. .. .. 9

i. Maxims and Rules for the Preservation of Health; Malaria; Quarantine .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 10

/. Travelling Servants; Roads; Hire of Horses, Ate. .. .. .. 11

J. Shooting, Fire-arms; Animal and Vegetable Productions, &c. .. 15

k Yachts, Boats, &c 16

•• Accommodation for Travellers; Provisions, Ate. .. .. 17

;'. Geographical Outline of Greece .. .. .. .. .. 19

I. Practical Observations on Hellenic Architecture .. .. 21

I. Outline of Greek History 25

B. Sketch of the Present Condition of the Greek Church .. .. 31

s. Observations on the Modem Greek Language.. .. .. .. 34

o. Character, Manners, and Customs of the Inhabitants of Greece, and

of the Greek Provinces of Turkey .. .. .. .. .. 41

Section I.—IONIAN ISLANDS.
Special Introductory Information
Boutes, and Descriptions of the several Islands

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Sbctioh II.-CONTINENTAL GREECE AND THE PELOPONNESUS. Special Introductory Information .. .. .. .. .. .. 98

P»rt I. Continental Greece

Part H. The Peloponnesus
Boutes ..

Section III.—ISLANDS OF THE .EGEAN SEA.
Special Introductory Information
Boutes, and Descriptions of the several Islands

A—Islands belonging to Greece ..

B.—Islands belonging to Turkey ..

Section IV.—ALBANIA, Special Introductory Information

Boutes

Gesebal Index

THESSALY, MACEDONIA.

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LIST OF ROUTES.

SECTION L
IONIAN ISLANDS.

General Introduction

PACK

1

Special Introductory Information.—Page 51.
Routes, And Descriptions Of The Several Islands.

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SECTION n.

CONTINENTAL GREECE AND THE PELOPONNESUS.

Special Introductory Information.—Page 98.

Skeleton Tours.—Page 110.

PART I.

CONTINENTAL GREECE.

Introductory Remarks.—Page 114.

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PART II.

THE PELOPONNESUS.

Introductory Remarks.—Page 263.

21. Athens to Nauplia, by Epi

daurut 264

22. Athens to Nauplia, by

-Sgina, Poros, Hydra, and
Syetzia 268

23. Nauplia to Sparta, by My

knut. Argot, Tripolitza, and
and Mantinea 273

24. Sparta, through Maina, to

Kalamata 284

25. Sparta, over Mount Tay

getus, to Kalamata .. .. 295

26. Sparta, by Messene, to Kala

mata 296

27. Kalamata to Sakona and

Messene 301

28. Kalamata to Kyparissia (Ar

cadia), by 1'ylos (iVasorino) 301

80TTTB PACK

29. Kyparissia to Tripolitza .. 306

30. Kyparissia, through Arcadia

and Elis, to Patras .. ..308

31. Pyrgos to Tchelebi .. ..312

32. Pyrgos to Patras, by Gastuni 313

33. Kalabryta to Corinth .. ..313

34. Andritzena to Kalabryta .. 314

35. Patras to Tripolitza .. .. 315

36. Karytena by Dimitzana, to

Kalabryta, and the Styx .. 316

37. Patras to Corinth, by Vos

titza, Megaspelion, and Sikyon 317

38. Nauplia to Patras, by Man

tinea, Phonia, and Vos-
titza 320

39. Nauplia to Corinth, by My

kena>, Nemea, and Cleorue 321

SECTION III. THE ISLANDS OF THE .EGEAN SEA.

Special Introductory Information.—Page 324.

Routes, And Descriptions Of The Several Islands.

A. Belonging to Greece.

PAGE

1. Svrosor Srra 327

2. Mos, with Rhenia .. ..330

3. Tenos 332

4. Mykonos 333

5. Andros 334

fi. Keos 335

7. Kvthnos (Thermia) .. ..336

8. Se'riphos 337

9. Siphnoa (Siphanto) .. ..338

10. KimoloB (Argentiera) .. .. 339

11. Melos 339

12. Phoh-gandros 341

13. Sikinos 341

1*. Ios(Nio) 341

15. Thera (Santorin) 342

lfi. Anaphe (Nafio) 343

17. Amorgos 344

Pag a

18. Naxos(Naxia) 344

19. Pares '.. .. 345

20. Oliaros (Antiparos) .. .. 347

The above form the Cyclades
in the widest acceptation of
that term, which is confined
by some writers to 12 or 15
of the islands immediately
encircling Delos.

The following islands off Eu-
bcea also belong to Greece.

21. Skyros 348

22. Ikos (Chiliodromia) .. .. 349

23. Preparethosl ggQ or Scopelos J

24. Skiathos 350 1. Thasos 351

B. Belonging to Turkey.

2. Samothrnce (Samothrake) .. 352

3. Lemnos (Stalime'ni) .. .. 353

4. Imbros 353

5. TeneJos, with Lagus&so In

sula? 354

6. Lesbos (Mytilene) 354

7. Psvra(Psara) 356

8. Chios (Soio) 357

9. Icaria (Nicaria), with Corsso

Insula) 360

10. Samoa 360

11. Patmos (Patino) 362

12. Lores 363

13. Kalymna 363

14. Astypalrea (Stanipalia).. .. 363

15. Kos(Stancn) 364

16. Nisyros 365

17. Telos (Episcopi) 365

18. Svrae 3G6

19. Chalki 366

20. Khodos or) ,-n ,.,. „„„

Rhodes } <Kodl> • - 366

21. Karpathos (Scarpanto).. .. 370

22. Kasos 371

23. Crete (Candia) 372

Excursions 380-398

N.B. A few barren rocks in various parts of the /Egean are omitted in the above lists. The Italian names are in brackets.

SECTION IV. ALBANIA, THESSALY, MACEDONIA.

Special Iutrodcctoby Infobmatiok.—Page 399.

KOCTR PAGE

40. Corfu to Joannina by Sayuda

and Fhilates .. ..' ..405

41. Corfu to Joannina by Delvino

and Zitsa 405

42 Corfu to Joannina by Gomen

itza and Paramytltia .. 410

43. Prevesa to Joannina by Nico

polis and Suli 412

44. Prevesa to Joannina by

Arta 417

45. Joannina to Parga by Drami

tiu» (Passaron) and Suli .. 418

46. Joannina by Argi/ro'lrastro and

Apollonia to Herat .. .. 424

47. Joannina by Premedi to

Berat 431

48. Joannina by Grevena, Kas

toria, and Konytza to Berat 432

49. Delvino by Durazzo to Scu

tari 434

ROUTR PAGE

50. Scutari to the Dalmatian

frontier and Cattaro.. .. 437

51. Tepeleni by Selinilza to Av

lona 438

52. Avlona by Khimdra to Bu

trinto 440

53. Joannina to Laritsa .. .. 445

54. Larissa to Lamia 449

55. Larissa to Volo and Armyrd 450

56. Larissa by Tempe to Sato

niea 451

57. Salonica, by Bercea, Senia,

arid Tumaro, to Larissa .. 456

58. Salonica to Mount Athos and

back to Salonica .. .. 457

59. Tour of the Monasteries of

Mount Athos 461

60. Salonica by Monaslir to Scu

tari 472

61. Salonica to Constantinople .. 478

62. Scutari to Constantinople .. 481 It ha3 been observed, under the head of Athens (p. 185), that there is no published general catalogue of the objects which form collectively the National Museum of Greece. It is intended that these shall, ere long, 1* gathered together, and deposited in one or other of two localities— those found in the Acropolis in the Museum behind tho Parthenon, and all the other national antiquities in the Museum now in course of con■traction on the Patissia road—a building erected from the funds left for the purpose by Mr. Stornari, a Greek merchant of Alexandria. When these two buildings shall have been completed, the Hellenic national collection, which is at present scattered, and stowed away in so many out-of-theway corners that few persons ever see the whole of it, will be, no doubt, duly catalogued. There exist but few QUerials fur compiling an instructive catalogue from, but in the mean time the following lists may be of use to ttarellers. They refer to some portions of the national collection as ttsy stand in the month of January, 1*14:—

POSTSCKIPT.

So» Account Of The Museum Of National Antiquities, Athens.

The Theseum.

On entering the temple, and turnas; to the right, there is a figure of »Lion (No. lj; beyond which lie a *fieg of Sepulchral Monuments, of which So. 2 is that of a Gymnast or Sifter of a school of exercise. The ponp numbered 19 iB very beautifully *Mcntcd. The Torso, No. 24, is succwded by other sepulchrnl monucaita. No. 34 represents Harmodius. beyond the tombstone numbered 37, Mlowing the outside wall of the

temple, is a Silenus; then a Pan; then a sepulchral vase; then some Roman heads; then a stele, and beyond it a sepulchral vase such as was erected in commemoration of a maiden. Beyond another tombstone nnd monument is (176) a Hermes. Beyond 17b' is a relievo brought from Patras, displaying Satyrs and Bacchantes. Nos. 259 and 276 are collections of sepulchral monuments, beyond which is a headless Hermes. (One may here recall to mind tho destruction of the 11 crime, or statues of the god Mercury, in one night at Athens, on the eve of the departure of the Sicilian expedition. This mysterious event led to the recall of Alcibiades and to tae downfall of the empire of Athens. Mr. Grote's description of the occurrence referred to will be read with more interest after seeing one of the headless Hernus.) No. 308 is one of the most beautiful monuments in the temple. No. 274 represents a Harpy: this monument is very ancient, and is unfinished. Beyond it, following the wull round to the entrance door, are a series of inscriptions relating to maritime affairs or events.

In the interior of the temple, to the left of tho door, No. 537 represents a e'eild with a bird. No. 352 is a headless statue of Minerva. No. 289 is a very fine work of art, representing an Athlete: it was found about ten years since at Atalnnta. Then conies an Apollo from the island of Theia, in the Archaic style of art, and similar to the Apollo of Tenos. Next to it, in a case, is the figure of A nation, tho warrior who is said to have brought to Athens the news of tho battle of Marathon. Beyond it is a sepulchral

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