History of Spanish Literature, المجلد 2

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الصفحة 138 - ... no ha sido otro mi deseo que poner en aborrecimiento de los hombres las fingidas y disparatadas historias de los libros de caballerías, que por las de mi verdadero don Quijote van ya tropezando, y han de caer del todo sin duda alguna.- Vale
الصفحة 411 - It leads him to repeat from himself till many of his personages become standing characters, and his heroes and their servants, his ladies and their confidants, his old men and his buffoons, seem to be produced, like the masked figures of the ancient theatre, to represent, with the same attributes and in the same costume, the different intrigues of his various plots. It leads him, in short, to regard the whole of the Spanish drama as a form, within whose limits his imagination may be indulged without...
الصفحة 140 - ... rather than a scornful or broken spirit, or a want of faith in what is most to be valued in our common nature. The great wonder is, that Cervantes succeeded. But that he did there is no question. No book of chivalry was written after the appearance of Don Quixote, in 1605 ; and from the same date, even those already enjoying the greatest favor ceased, with one or two unimportant exceptions, to be reprinted; so that from that time to the present they have been constantly disappearing, until they...
الصفحة 146 - Amadis, becomes gradually a detached, separate, and wholly independent personage, into whom is infused so much of a generous and elevated nature, such gentleness and delicacy, such a pure sense of honor, and such a warm love for whatever is noble and good, that we feel almost the same attachment to him that the barber and the curate did, and are almost as ready as his family was to mourn over his death.
الصفحة 177 - O, hush, then, and keep Your branches all still, — My babe is asleep! Cold blasts wheel about him, — A rigorous storm, — And ye see how, in vain, I would shelter his form; — Holy angels and blest, As above me ye sweep, Hold these branches at rest, — My babe is asleep!
الصفحة 141 - ... all into the plain prose of truth with an admirable simplicity, quite unconscious of its own humor, and rendered the more striking by its contrast with the lofty and courteous dignity and magnificent illusions of the superior personage. There could, of course, be but one consistent termination of adventures like these. The knight and his esquire suffer a series of ridiculous discomfitures, and are at last brought home, like madmen, to their native village, where Cervantes leaves them, with an...
الصفحة 150 - ... with all its unquenchable and irresistible humor, with its bright views of the world, and its cheerful trust in goodness and virtue — it was written in his old age, at the conclusion of a life nearly every step of which had been marked with disappointed expectations, disheartening struggles and sore calamities ; that he began it in a prison, and that it was finished when he felt the hand of death pressing heavy and cold upon his heart. If this be remembered as we read, we may feel, as we ought...
الصفحة 177 - For my babe is asleepAnd ye Bethlehem palm-trees, As stormy winds rush In tempest and fury, Your angry noise hush ; — Move gently, move gently, Restrain your wild sweep ; Hold your branches at rest, — My babe is asleep. My babe all divine, With earth's sorrows oppressed, Seeks...
الصفحة 137 - Literature.1' 187* DESIGN OF CERVANTES IN WRITING DON QUIXOTE. His purpose in writing the Don Quixote has sometimes been enlarged by the ingenuity of a refined criticism, until it lias been made to embrace the whole of the endless contrast between the poetical and the prosaic in our natures, — between heroism and generosity on one side, as if they were mere illusions, and a cold selfishness on the other, as if it were the truth and reality of life.
الصفحة 146 - Quixote, and used merely to bring out his master's peculiarities in a more striking relief. It is not until we have gone through nearly half of the First Part that he utters one of those proverbs which form afterwards the staple of his conversation and humor; and it is not till the opening of the Second Part, and, indeed, not till he comes forth, in all his mingled shrewdness and credulity, as governor of Barataria, that his character is quite developed and completed to the full measure of its grotesque...

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