The Empire of the Nairs; Or, The Rights of Women: An Utopian Romance, in Twelve Books, المجلد 3

الغلاف الأمامي
T. Hookham, Jun. and E.T. Hookham, 1811
 

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الصفحة 66 - When lovely woman stoops to folly. And finds, too late, that men betray. What charm can soothe her melancholy, What art can wash her guilt away? The only art her guilt to cover. To hide her shame from every eye, To give repentance to her lover, And wring his bosom, — is to die.
الصفحة 138 - a husband, who would wish to keep his wife to himself, would be considered a disturber of the public happiness, and as a madman who would monopolise the light of the sun. He who loves his own wife, is one who is not agreeable enough to gain the affections of any other man's wife, who takes advantage of a law to make amends for his own want of amiability; and who contributes, as far as lies in his power, to overturn a tacit convention, that is conducive to the happiness of both sexes."38 In England...
الصفحة 130 - Know ye not, that though constancy is no merit, it is a source of happiness ; and that, though inconstancy is no crime, it is no blessing, much less a boast ? O ye Europeans ! ye children of vanity and prejudice I Fitz-Allan.
الصفحة 138 - ... would be considered a disturber of the public happiness, and as a madman who would monopolise the light of the sun. He who loves his own wife, is one who is not agreeable enough to gain the affections of any other man's wife, who takes advantage of a law to make amends for his own want of amiability; and who contributes, as far as lies in his power, to overturn a tacit convention, that is conducive to the happiness of both sexes."38 In England conditions were no better. A husband might consort...

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