صور الصفحة
PDF
النشر الإلكتروني
[merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small]

INTERVIEW OF THE “ STRAGGLING ASTROLOGER,"* WITH

KING RHEO RHIO, AND QUEEN KAMCHAMEHA. It is scarcely necessary to signify, his Sundwich Eminency, at the British that the group of islands which con Museum. It is very difficult to get stitute the empire of this potentate,

at the nativities of persons so reis, in direct longitude from England, motely born, because, in the first nearly half round the earth. They place, their modes of keeping time are called the Sandwich Islands, by are different from ours; and again, the English, for two reasons-- First, the difference of longitude, unless Because there would be alınost a chronometers of a like kind were certainty of European jaws going to used to mark the time of birth, and wreck by attempts to call them aster geographical distance, or some means their proper names-Secondly, Out equally correct, the problem could of conipliment to the Earl of Sand not, at the best, be solved very satiswich, under whose administration factorily. The only means, therethey were discovered, were they like fore, of coming at any astrological wise called as we call them.

conclusions must be by the exterior, Such curious exoticts as this em and by associating such aspects as peror and empress are, would neces have been pending this curious expesarily attract the attention of the dition ; and having had the opporStraggling Astrologer, whese ram. tunity of contemplating the royal bles, do you see, are taken for the islander from stein to stern, and of purpose of making remarks on per obtaining some few particulars of sons and things out of the common him and his gracious consort, what way. Tuesday afforded him the op follows has been deduced from all portunity of paying his respects to the means of judging that we possess :

* A new and most singular weekly work under this title, was commenced three weeks ago, from which we extract the above. The “ Straggling Astrologer," edited by the Gentleman who is the principal compiler of the “ Prophetic Almanack," and eacli Number is embellished with two surious Hieroglyphics.

appeared in their own scarf and feaDescription of the said King and

thers, it would have been something Queen, and also of another Blood like. Their noses are very ugly, Royal, just imported from the same

which I am told is occasioned by Seus.

their kissing one another with them. KING RHEO Rhio is about five When a gentleman of those parts feet ten inches high, and says he is salutes a lady very warmly, he pushes but twenty-six years of age, though I his nose against hers very hard inapprehend they don't estimate years deed; and their noses are held as very correctly. He has the look of

though glued together for some time, having passed thirty. His make is

according to the degree of warmth robust, but not corpulent; and on with which the salute is given; and the whole he is not a bad figure, which is finished by routing one anothough his head and face rather ex ther's noses with one another's noses ceed the proportion that we call as hard as ever they can rout them : good, especially, his face, which is a better method of kissing, than very broad and coarse. There is which it is most likely they will take nothing remarkable in the expression back with them. of his eyes, nor is there any thing A very curious and just-landed animated in his gesture or look. He specimen of another branch of the was met by Mr. Planta, cap in hand, royal blood from the same seas made upon the steps of the Museum, and his appearance in the court-yard of by a bob froin his page, he touched the Museum, whose face was tathis hat in an awkward sort of way, and tooed according to the finest style or upon being bobbed a second time he

purest taste of that part of the world. lifted it off, and shewed an English Four broad streaks of deep blue roof. His face is of a deep copper crossed horizontally from the temples colour, or dark bronze, and his hair and ears towards the middle of the very black and curly. His manner forehead and nose, and contrasted is that of a boor just raised to a rank very well with the copper of the above his capacity, and trying very visage. He is a youth about eighhard to be good-mannerly, but quite teen, rather thin, and of middle staunable to manage it at ease.

Take ture. He was under the care of two him as a whole, he would not make tutors to be instructed in English, a bad John Bull of the middling but as he has nothing more to do kind. The royal regalings at his with their majesties Rheo Rhio and court are upon dogs; but have not and Kamchameha, than being from heard of his having eaten up any some island of the same vast ocean, English dogs.

he is only mentioned here as a like Queen Kamchameha is a strapping outlandish curiosity now among us. dame, well nigh as tall as King Rheo-also well nigh as muscular,

MR. OXBERRY. and rather older. She evinces all the Tuis clever performer died sudpeculiarities which any one may sup; denly on Wednesday, at the age of pose distinguish the thorough-bred about forty. He was the son of a Sandwicher : but no marks of tat respectable tradesman in the parish of tooing appear on their faces, which St. Luke's, and originally intended was, according to all accounts, as ne for an artist, having been placed uncessary a distinction as circumcising der the care of Mr. Stubbs, with that is among the Jews. It is possible, ohject in view. Tiring of this proif we were to behold them denudated, fession, he was afterwards for two or as they sit upon their native thrones, three years in the house of Mr. inany of these national marks might Ribeau, a printer and bookseller, in appear on their bodies and linbs. Blandford Street; and while there, They may be said to have been quite commenced operations as an actor, denaturalized by being dressed up at a private theatre in Queen Ann in English clothes, and thus made Street. His first part was Hassan, not worth seeing; whereas, bad they in the Castle Spectre. He after

MISS CRACHAMI. SIGNOR MAGLIABECHI.

155

wards joined another company in intellectual attributes of perfect huBerwick Street, where he played manity. It staggered the inquiring David, in the Rivals, so little to the mind to contemplate her; and one satisfaction of his associates that he could not help revolving the strange was displaced. To shame them, he doubts which arose. Is there here resolved on a public appearance, and in this pigmy production of nature, chose the village of Edgeware for the which we can merely say belongs to experiment. Still success did not the highest order of creation, reattend him; but his perseverance sponsibility of action, principle, soul, obtained an engagement from the and immortality? The party in whose Southend Manager, then performing charge she was, were attentive to at Watford. With him he was cast her; and we only regret that the into Antonio's (Merchant of Venice), exhibition was not made less conGlenalvon's (Douglas), and similar stant and fatiguing for so delicate and parts; till accident threw him into fragile a creature. the line which nature and his bent of mind had intended him. Instead

ANECDOTE. of Peregrine in John Bull, he was SIGNOR MAGLIABECHI, a Florenput, on an emergency, into Dan; and tine of the seventeenth century, was though he did afterwards try Rich of low origin, but raised himself by ard III. and such matters, he at his extensive learning and astonishlength attracted the notice of Mr.

ing memory. It is said, that there Siddons, and settled into his forte, was a trial made of the force of his low comedy. Iu November 1807, he

memory. A gentleman at Florence, made his debut at Covent Garden who had written a piece which was Theatre; but did not produce a very to be printed, lent the manuscript to favourable impression. At Glasgow Magliabechi; and some time after he was more fortunate, and returned it had been returned with thanks, with greater confidence to London,

came to him again with a melancholy where the Lyceum (under Mr. Ray face, and told him of some invented mond) gave him the opportunities of accident, by which, he said, he had new characters, in which he became lost his manuscript.

The author a decided favourite with the town. seemed almost inconsolable for the Drury Lane, the Haymarket, the

loss of his work, and intreated MaOlympic, and the Surrey, have since

gliabechi, whose character for reenjoyed his exertions. In rustics, membering what he read was already particularly, he displayed much ta

very great, to try to recollect as much lent; but his humour was frequently of it as he possibly could, and write rather coarse.

His Robin Rough it down for him, against his next head was one of his best characters; visit. Magliabechi assured him he but he filled many others with con would, and, on setting about it, wrote siderable ability

down the whole manuscript without

missing a single word. MISS CRACHAMI.

Magliabechi had a local memory Tuis poor

little dwarf is dead. She too of the places where every book had been unwell for a few days; and stood : and seems to have carried expired on her way home, after under this no farther than only in relation going, the fatigue of receiving above to the collections of books with which 200 visitors on Thursday last. The he was personally acquainted. One frequency of our mention of this ex day the great Duke sent for him, traordinary being, may have shown after he was his librarian, to ask him, that we felt a kindly interest in her whether he could get him a book that welfare; and we are really sorry for was particularly scarce. No, sir," her so early demise. Yet the great answered Magliabechi, “it is imposwonder was that the machinery of sible, for there is but one in the life could have been carried on so world; that is in the Grand Signior's long in so minute and diminutive a library at Constantinople, and is the form; that a creature like this should seventh book on the second shelf on possess all the physical, moral, and the right hand as you go in.”

[ocr errors]

III. THE MECHANIC-THE ARTIST-THE PHILOSOPHER.

that, why fulminating powder, alMR. PERKINS ACCOUNT OF though infinitely stronger than gun. HIS STEAM-GUN.

powder, will not (though it bursts

the gun) throw the ball one-twentieth OBSERVING, while experimenting part so far, the power being too inwith the generator, that substances,

stantaneous for projectiles; gunpowwhether metallic or otherwise, when der being less so, gives greater effect, they rose from the bottom of the although the mechanical pressure is generator through the tube of the much less. Steam power, acting with stop-cock, were projected with great constant pressure on the ball until it velocity; the thought naturally struck leaves the gun, in consequence of the me, that with a properly constructed non-diminishing generation of it, is, gun, projectiles might be thrown with I believe, the cause of the increased great power and economy. It also effect. appeared to me, that it would at once settle the important question

SOCIETY OF PAINTERS IN respecting velocity, as well as power

WATER COLOURS. of high elastic steam. No time was therefore lost in constructing a gun, Very pleasing pictures may be and on the first experiment my most painted in Water Colours by dint sanguine hopes were realized, as mus merely of what is termed general ket-balls, at the rate of 240 per mi effect, without so great and neat a denute, were projected with a velocity tail of parts as is required in Oils; equal to gunpowder. I dare not spe hence Water-colour painters rarely culate on the consequences of this perform well in Oils. But Mr. Nesdiscovery, as I feel satisfied, that the field is one of those painters who dispower, economy, and siinplicity of dain the applause of beautiful effects this agent is such,

that one projectile from mere generalising. He details may be found sufficient to force any with the truth-taught minuteness of breach, or sink the largest ship, the Dutch, without losing their though it gives nie great pleasure to breadth. For instance--- 159, Scene hear the opinion so often repeated, in Branspeck Park, has a spirited and that this power will be to gunpowder varied niarking in every part of the what that has been to the arrow. outlines of the trees, and the bullet

I have found that forty atmo smitten stag, &c. and as capitally spheres' pressure is equal to gun filled up between the outlines; so powder ; viz. an ounce ball dis that, in the comparison, Mr. Hill's charged against an iron target from (a clever painter of animals in a six foot barrel about one-thirty miniature, as is plain in his adsecond part smaller than the hall, joining pictures, 154 and 163) is was flattened 10 21 inches in diame feeble.--- For effects of clearness and ter; and at 45 atmospheres, its blow a nice balance of colour, with a fine against the target liquified the lead.

openness of scene, air, distances, and An ounce ball discharged from a clean finishing, we admire Mr. Robmusket with powder, with the com son. 134, Loch Katerine, and 147, mon field charge, at the same dis Upper part of Loch Lomond, are tance, did not show more effect. It

among his most felicitous examples. is said, with great plausibility, that All the painters in this Society whom there must be some fallacy in this we have not yet mentioned, have imexperiment; for as it takes from 500 proved much upon their former tato 1000 atmospheres' pressure to lent. In Mr. Cox's Shepherds collectpropel a ball with proper effect with ing their Flock, there is a flushing powder, it is asked, how can it take luxuriance of foilage and evening's but 40 or 50 atmospheres of steam to amber glow; and fancy fluats felicido the same? Having the fact before tously in 48, Vessels sailing up the me, I think I can find the reason, Thames. In Mr. Turner's Scene near which I have no doubt is the same as 0.xford, 110, Nature revives under the

1

TO GILD WITHOUT GOLD.-ANECDOTE.

157 cheering sun from a dropsical over and granulated by being first pressed flowing. Mr. Prout paints his power.. through a sieve and then rolled in a ful edificial effects with less violence cask. To detect this it was only nethan formerly. He has the taste of cessary to throw it into water. Real the late Mr. Edridye, with an added pepper remains whole, while the artipurity of colour, and carries our ficial pepper corns fall to powder. minds out of the picture frames into The same test would answer for the the sun and air. His Munich, 222, is above spurious pepper, as the flour magnificent, as are his Indiaman dis and mustard-seed would immediately mantled, and, 90, Cologne. Gothic become soft, and at length dissolve. grace and grandeur, the cool, grey hue of its stone and marble, with its shades and stately venerableness TEST OF PERFECT VACCINA. cheered by the painted windows, red

TION. banners, and beaming sun, like health on the cheek of age, encrease

When a person has been vacci. nated on one arm,

the the professional praise of Mr. F.

surgeon should Nash. Mr. Stephanoff's Knight pre

vaccinate the other arm with matter

taken from the first. If the first paring for a Tournament, glistens like a cluster of jewels.

vaccination has been perfect the pus• R. H.

tules on both arms will grow to a

head at precisely the same time ; and TO GILD WITHOUT GOLD. if this does not take place the system Put an ounce of sal ammoniac and

has not been properly affected, and half an ounce of mercury in a cru

the vaccination ought to be repeated. cible; cover it and lute it well, for

This simple and easy test, first fear the mercury should escape. Put

brought into notice by Dr. Bryce, of the crucible on a slow fire for about

Edinburgh, ought never to be nehalf an hour, and then increase the

glected. heat till the crucible is red hot. When this is the case, throw the composition into cold water, and TO PRESERVE MILK. when it is cold it will be as hard as a

Put a spoonful of wild horse-radish stone. Break and grind, and dissolve

into a pan of milk, and it will remain it in gum-water, and wherever you

sweet for several days, either in the lay a coat of this will look like

open air or in a cellar, while other gilt.

milk will change.--Hygie, ou Journal

de Santé, &c. SPURIOUS PEPPER. An artificial pepper has lately found its way into this country from

ANECDOTE. France, and been hawked about with GEORGE the First complained, on considerable success. It consists of his arrival in England, that the peothe grains of the brassica napus, over ple did not understand property. which a paste, made of flower, mixed “ This is a strange country,” said his with a little powder of Cayenne pep. Majesty, “ the first morning after per, or mustard-seed, has been care my arrival at St. James's, I looked out fully laid and dried. The imposition at the window, and saw a park with may be easily detected by splitting walks ; a canal, &c. which they told the grains, when the artificial nature me were mine. The next day Lord of their texture will be at once appa Chetwynd, the ranger of my park, rent.--Mechanic's Mag.

sent me a fine brace of carp out of Mr. Accum informs us that a dif my canal; and I was told," I must ferent species of spurious pepper was give five guineas to Lord Chetwynd's formerly in use. This was made of servant for bringing me my own carp oil-cakes, common clay, and a portion out of my own canal, in my own of Cayenne pepper, mixed together, park!"

« السابقةمتابعة »