صور الصفحة
PDF
النشر الإلكتروني

С

PAGE

Childhood. By Wm. B. Fairchild..
Consumption.
Chansonette. By C. F. Hoffman.

PAGE |Ode to Love. By W. Wallace.....

637
614 Oh! Pity the Stranger. By a Young Lady..... 704
741

P
792

Prize Address. By Dr. Henry Myers...... 833

D

Dramatic Epigrams...

25

R
Dreams. By the author of “The Poet.”... 294

Return to Delaware. By the Milford Bard...... 721
Do You Remember ? To Anna. By C. M. F. D. 757 Rejected Address. By a Citizen of Richmond... 833
Delphian Amusements....

813

S
E

Sur Les Etats Unis D'Amerique ; a Poem, presen-
Evening Clouds......

671
ted to Dr. Franklin....

178
Extracts from a Poem. By Park Benjamin..... 702

Sonnet. By Hermion. New York..

210
Early Lays. By W. G. Simms..

817
Spring Birds. By Eliza, of Maine...

289
Eve's Compliment to Adam..

832

Sonnet—The Recall. By Park Benjamin... 305
F
Spring. By W..

319
Siege of Fort Wheeling..

325
First Love. By J. T. L.......
288 Stanzas. By James F. Otis....

349
From My Nook in the Northern Neck.. 313 Sonnets-Indolence. By Park Benjamin....... 393

Song-written impromptu. By Park Benjamin.. 407
H Η

Sonnet. To My Sisters. By C. P. C.......... 419
Human Life is Like the Year.
661 Sonnet. By Park Benjamin....

433
Hope. By the Milford Bard..

694 Scraps from Manuscript Dramas. By Park Ben-
jamin....

531
I
Sonnets to “ J. D.” By C. W. Everest.

693
Impromptu.....

33

T
I Have Breathed Thy Name. By Egeria... 134
I Love Thee Still.....
152 The Past. By Elora; Philadelphia......

2
I Have Not Lived in Vain...

193 The Spectre Horseman of Boston. By J. E. Dow 13
I will not Forget Thee. By a young Lady. 305 The Bones of Leipsic. By J. E. D..

16
“I went to Gather Flowers.” By Nugator.. 432 The Exile's Native Land...

19
Is there a God ? By Egeria......
605 The Bride of the Dead. By E. H. C.....

43
Impromptu to a Lady Blushing. By C. F. Hoffman 787 The New England Girl. By J. E. D...

43
Italy ..
809 The Beechen Tree...

79
Isaiah II. 4. By Rev. E. H. Chapin..
. 838 The Amreeta or Drink of Immortality.

85
The Steamboat Neptune. By Mrs. L. H. Sigour-
K
ney......

101

104

The Guitar....
Kouli Khan...

835
The Greek Captive. By Egeria...

136
L

The Pilgrini Amid the Ruins of Rome. By John
C. McCabe.....

146
Lines Written at Midnight. By C. M. F. Deems 12 The Grave. By J. L. M., Washington City.... 149
Lights of Life. By B. W. H.

268
To Virginia. By J. T. L.....

152
Leading A pes in H***, Patty's Retort.... 296

The Death of Saladin. By C. F. M. Deems..... 152
Lines Written for a Young Lady's Album...... 359

The Discarded.

202
Lines Written for an Old Lady's Album...

To the Rose. By H. M. S..

205
Lines to one who will understand them...

369

To a Lady, with a Bouquet. By Park Benjamin. 221
Lines on the United States of America..

400

The Idiot Boy. By Miss E. H. Stockton... 223
Love Unchanging. By Park Benjamin.

529
The Wanderer to his Native Home....

256
Lines Written in an Album...

777
The May-Flower. By Eliza, of Maine..

263
Lines Addressed to a Lady..

826
The Elisian Isle. By Park Benjamin..

268
Lines Addressed to a Young Lady..

828
True Beauty. By C. P.C.

290
M
The Camelia. By Cora..

291
There is no Star. By Park Benjamin...

292
Major Andre's Soliloquy-Return Enraptured Tasso and Leonora. By J. T. L..

293
Hours .
587 The Youthful Dead..

294
Time and Grief...

304
0
The Tired Hunter. By Park Benjamin..

330
On a Miniature Portrait. To a Young Lady.... 267 To a Lady Playing on a Harp.......
Edipus at Colonus. From the Choral piece of The New Song and the Old Song.

355
Sophocles ....
575 | The Harp of Judah.....

355

3

350

[blocks in formation]

766

The Fountain. By Wm. Cullen Bryant...... 365 The Water. By Mrs. Seba Smith.....

720
To Queen Victoria...

369 The Forest. By Mrs. Lydia Jane Pierson., 725
The Mother's Farewell. By Godfrey Underwood 406 Twilight Fancies. By a young Lady of N. York 733
The Birds in Autumn. By Mrs. Sigourney. 430 The Orphan. By a young Lady of S. Carolina.. 748
To Miss Written in her Album.... 440 The Subtilty of Love. By a Gentleman of N.
The Origin of the Myrtle. By C. P. C.... 448 York......
To Margaret. By G. W. B.......

453 To a Friend on his Marriage. By Park Benjamin_781
To the Printers...
512 The Stream and the Flower...

792
The First Polar Voyage. By S. M. Janney. 518 The Prediction and the Fulfilment

798
The Mockingbird and Fairy...
523 The Prude......

826
The Sister of Charity. By J. L. M.

566

V
To a very Little Child. By Godfrey Underwood. 570
To the Amaranth. By Mrs. Seba Smith........ 572

309
The Mother's Rainy Day. By Mrs. Sigourney.. 581 Virgil's Tomb. By Park Benjamin......
The Dying Swan. By a young Lady of Virginia 601 Versiculi, No. I and II. By Lewis St. Maur..... 459

No. III and IV

558
To My Mother. By William Wallace... 605
The Whippoorwill. By Park Benjamin...... 663

W
To the Memory of L. E. L. By Mrs. L. J. Pierson 676
The Ballad of Sancha of Castile and the Count
Winter. By C. P. C......

12
Alarcós. By G. W. M.....
688 Winter. By D......,

141
The Revel.....
693 Wyoming. By Mrs. Sigourney..

413
The Student in Agrippa's Museum.

706

When Will Love Cease. By the late Edmund Law 512
The Silent Tear. By the Milford Bard.

708
The Sunbeam..

708

Y
The Beleagured City. By Prof. Henry W. Long.
fellow.....
709 Youth. By Elia....

96

SOUTHERN
LITERARY MESSENGER.

T. W. WHITE, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.

NO. I.

CONTENTS:

ORIGINAL PROSE ARTICLES.

ORIGINAL PROSE ARTICLES-(CONTINUED.)

PAGE

PAGE

1. Editor's Address to the Friends and Subscribers of the 11. Alice Richmond. A tale, in seven chapters-complete.. 60

Messenger, on the commencement of the fifth volume.. 1 12. American Almanac, for 1839. Notice of this valuable

2. A scheme for Rebuilding Southern Commerce. Direct

publication, with an extract relative to the government

trade with the South ; navigation of the Atlantic; pack.

of France, the King, Chamber of Peers, and Chamber

e ships of New York; their influence over the cum-

of Deputies....

SO

Derce of the United States, and their effects on Ame. 13. Ex-president Adams's Letter to the members of the

ritan daval architecture; packet ships of Boston,

Franklin Association of Baltimore, in reference to the

Philadelphia, &c.; their origin and progressive im.

selection of a young men's library ;" appended to

provement; Norfolk best fited for the port or empo-

which are farther observations on the same subject. .. 81

rium of the United States; proposition to make that 14. Notice of a “Lecture on the Study of the Classics, deli.

place the centre of exchange for New Orleans and the

vered in Washington College, Va., September 10, 1938,

South; with a chart, (engraved for the Messenger,)

by George E. Dabney, A. M.” Published by request

showing the track of the "Great Western" on her first

of the students...

83

trip to New York, the shortest route from London, 15. Mola di Gaela, a sketch from the recollections of a tra.

Liverpool, &c., to New York and to Norfolk, and the

veller-Velletri ; the Pontine Marshes; the Appian

priper course to be taken by ships to and fro across the

Way; the Campagna di Romagna; Terracina, Fon-

Arlantic, &c. By an officer of the U. S. Navy... 2 di, &c. By J. L. M., Washington City....

96

1. Currente-Calamosities, to the Editor of the Messenger, 16. The First Statue of Canova: whimsical occurrence

with nameroua poetical selections, on various subjects.

which first introduced this great man to the world-

By dames F Otis.

14

the lion of butter. Translated from the French for the

1. Derekory Speculator. “ Actors ;” origin of the dra.

Messenger

98

matic art, and the estimation in which it was held by

ORIGINAL POETRY.

the Greeks and Romans; the Mysteries, or Sacred

Drama; saints and martyrs of the players; prejudice

17. The Past. By Elora; Philadelphia..

of modern nations against the professors of the drama-

18 Winter. By CP.C

lie art; public opinion on the subject in this country ;

19. Lines written at Midnight. By Charles M. F. Deems.... 12

13

talents necessary to constitute a good actor, &c. By G.

20. The Spectre Horseman of Boston. By J. E. Dow.......
W., Washington City....

17

2. Beauty. Written for Miss Emily S- -y. By Eliza;

6. Aa address delivered before the ewo Literary Societies

Maine..

16

of Randolph Macon College, Va., June 19, 1838 ; by

22. The Bones or Leipsic. By J. E. D.; Washington City... 16

19

Huu. Jokn Tyler. Published by request of the two so-

23. The Exile's Native Land..

20 24. Dramatic Epigrams. 1. On a Young Lady's saying

S. "A Voyage Round the World, including an embassy

she was in love with the Drarna. %. On Manager

to Mosca and Siam, in 1835–36 and '37, by W. S. Rus.

Ward's announcing that he must change his Theatre

25

chenberger, Surgeon United States Navy, author of

into a Circus..

33

"Three Years in the Pacific.'" A critical review of

25. Impromptu. (Selected.)

this new and interesting work, with extracts..........

26. Bridal Address, to E. F. M****; recited at her nuptials,

26

33

1 7. The Falls of Bash Pish, or the Eagle's Nest. Journal of

in New York, by her sister...

a summer excursion in the interior of New York ; by

27. The Bride of the Dead. By E H. C., of Richmond..... 43

43

28. The New England Girl. By J. E. D..

31

2 Nates and Anecdotes, political and miscellaneous, from

29. The Beechen Tree. By the author of “Clinton Brad-

79

1798 to 1330; drawn from the port.folio of an officer of

shaw," &c...

the empire, and translated from the French for the

30. Acrostic on a famous Belle, who had just completed a

Messenger, by a gentleman in Paris. Speeches in the

"stuff shoe” of questionable utility...

80

Chambers ; Prince Talleyrand in July, 1830 ; the Mar-

31. The Amreeta, or Drink of Immortality; a Hindú Fable.

85

9. Notes of a Tour from Virginia to Tennessee, in the

ehal, Duke of Ragusa ; M. de Polignac in 1930..

By Charles M. F. Deems.....

39

CONTENTS OF COVER.

months of July and August, 1833 ; by Rev. Henry

Ruffner

, D.D., President of Washington College, Lex.

Title and Contents, page 1; Prospectus and Conditions

Ington, Va. Chapter I. (To be continued.)..

of the Messenger, page 2 ; Monthly List of Payments, page

10. Dorcas Lindsay, or the Bachelor's Writing Desk. By

3; List of Agents, and Advertisements, J. W. Randolph &

the author of the Bachelor's Death Bed"--complete.. 48

Co., Richmond; the Morris Housc, Philadelphia; Legal

Notice, page 4.

ii.

SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER-COVER.

PROSPECTUS OF THE SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSEN

THOMAS W. WHITE, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.

This is a monthly Magazine, devoted chiefly to Lite their fitting haunts. Ignorance lords it o Rature, but occasionally finding room also for articles proportion of our people :--Every spring that fall within the scope of Science; and not professing in motion, to arouse the enlightened, < an entire disdain of tasteful selections, though its matter their number; so that the great enemy has been, as it will continue to be, in the main, original. vernment may no longer brood, like a po

Party Politics and controversial Theology, as far as over the destinies of our country. And possible, are jealously excluded. They are sometimes all these ends, what more powerful ag so blended with discussions in literature or in moral ployed, than a periodical, on the plan of 1 science, otherwise unobjectionable, as to gain admittance if that plan be but carried out in practice for the sake of the more valuable matter to which they The South peculiarly requires such adhere: but whenever that happens, they are incidental, all the Union, south of Washington, the only; not primary. They are dross, tolerated only Literary periodicals! Northward of that because it cannot well be severed from the sterling ore probably at least twenty-five or thirty ! wherewith it is incorporated.

justified by the wealth, the leisure, the of Reviews, and Critical Notices, occupy their due the actual literary taste, of the Souther space in the work: and it is the Editor's aim that they pared with those of the Northern ? No: should have a threefoid tendency—to convey, in a con- talents, and taste, we may justly cla densed form, such valuable truths or interesting incidents equality with our brethren; and a dome as are embodied in the works reviewed, -lo direct the exclusively our own, beyond all doubt aj reader's attention to books that deserve to be read, ---and choose, twice the leisure for reading and to warn him against wasting time and money upon they enjoy: that large number, which merit only to be burned. In It was from a deep sense of this local this age of publications that by their variety and multi- word SOUTHERN was engrafted on the na tude distract and overwhelm every undiscriminating riodical: and not with any design to nou student, IMPARTIAL criticism, governed by the views judices, or to advocate supposed local i just mentioned, is one of the most inestimable and from any such thought, it is the Editor's fe indispensable of auxiliaries, to him who does wish to see the North and South bound endear discriminate.

forever, in the silken bands of mutual Essays, and Tales, having in view utility or amuse. affection. Far from meditating hostility ment, or both—HISTORICAL SKETCHES—and REMINIS he has already drawn, and he hopes here CENCES of events too minule for History, yet elucida much of his choicest matter thence : and ting it, and heightening its interest, -may be ps ded will he deem himself, should his pages, by as forming the staple of the work. And of indigenous region know the other better, contribute Poetry, enough is published-sometimes of no mean tial degree to dispel the lowering clou strain-to manifest and to cultivate the growing poeti- threaten the peace of both, and to brighten cal taste and talents of our country.

en the sacred ties of fraternal love. The times appear, for several reasons, to demand The SOUTHERN LITERARY MESSENGER such a work—and not one alone, but many. The pub- in existence four years the present No lic mind is feverish and irritated still, from recent politi. the fifth VOLUME. How far it has acted cal strifes :—The soft, assuasive influence of Literature here ultered, is not for the Editor to say is needed, to allay that fever, and soothe that irritation. bowever, that it falls not further short Vice and folly are rioting abroad :—They should be human weakness usually makes Practice driven by indignant rebuke, or lashed by ridicule, into Theorij.

CONDITIONS. 1. The Southern Literary Messenger is pub- thus transmitting payment, is requested (b lished in monthly numbers. Each number contains not proper evidence of the fact and date of m less than 64 large super-royal pages, printed on good lain a memorandum of the number and part type, and in the best manner, and on paper of the most of the note sent. beautiful and expensive quality.

4. If a subscription is not directed to be 2. The “MESSENGER” hereafter will be mailed on or before the first number of a volume bas bee about the first day of every month in the year. Twelve it will be taken as a continuance for anothe numbers make a volume, and the price of subscrip. 5. Any one enclosing a $20 currert bill, tion is $5 per volume, payable in advance ;-nor will the with the names of five new subscribers, $ work hereafter be sent to any one, unless the order for Five copies of the Messenger for one year it is accompanied with the cash. Tije

year commences 6. The mutual obligations of the publish with the Jannary number. No subscription received scriber, for the year, are fully incurred as for less than the year. A single number of the Mes first number of the volume is issued: and aft senger will not be sold to any person for less than the no discontinuance of a subscription will be price of a year's subscription.

Nor will any subscription be discontinued 3. The risk of transmitting subscriptions by mail will thing remains due thereon, unless at the of be assumed by the proprietor. Bui every subscriber I editor.

RICHMOND, JANUARI

« السابقةمتابعة »