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ciples were very different from his own. Agrestis had very just notions of right and wrong, by which he regulated his conduct without any regard to the opinion of others: his integrity was universal and inflexible, and his temper ardent and open; he abhorred whatever had the appearance of difingenuity, he was extremely jealous of his authority, and there was a rough fimplicity in his manner which many circumstances of his life had contributed to produce. His father left him a fortune of two hundred thousand pounds; but as the parfimony which enabled him to amass it, extended to the education of his fon by whom it was to be possessed, he had been taught neither politeness nor literature. He married a lady, whose influence would have polished the rough diamond by degrees; but she died within the first year of her marriage, leaving him a daughter to whom he gave her name Amelia, and transferred all his affection: he, therefore, continued to live in great privacy; and being used to have only servants and dependants about him, he indulged the peculiarities of his humour without that complaisance which becomes infenfibly habitual to those, who mix in the company of persons whom it is their apparent interest to please, and whose presence is a perpetual restraint upon such irregular starts of temper as would incur contempt by arrogating a superiority which none would acknowledge. To this disposition his daughter accommodated herself as she grew up, from motives both of affection and duty: as he knew and regretted the defect of his own education, he spared no cost to complete her's; and the is indeed the most accomplished character I ever knew : her obedience is cheerful and implicit, her affection tender and without parade; her looks express

the

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the utmost sweetness and sensibility, and yet there is a dignity in her manner which commands respect.

The intimacy between the father of Eugenio and Agrestis produced a tender friendship between his fifter and Amelia, which began in their infancy, and increafed with their years.

Such characters as Amelia and Eugenio, could not be long familiarly known to each other, without exciting mutual esteem: the transition from esteem to love, between perfons of different sexes, is often imperceptible even to themselves; and, perhaps, was not discovered till long after it had happened, either by Eugenio or Amelia. When he returned from the university, she was about eighteen! as her ftature and her beauty were greatly increased during this interval, their first effect upon Eugenio was proportionably greater; and he perceived from whatever cause, a more sensible emotion in her. He had too much discernment not to dis·cover that she loved him; and too much generosity not to conceal his love of her, because he was so much her inferior in fortune : sometimes he reflected upon her partiality with pleasure, and sometimes with regret; but while they were thus mutually conscious to desires which they mutually suppressed, the late rebellion broke out, and Eugenio was commanded into Scotland. In this expedition he distinguished himself equally by his courage and humanity: and though he had not much money, and therefore could but seldom, display his bounty ; yet his concern for the real interest of his men was fo apparent, as well in such acts of kindness as were in his power, as in the striet difcipline which he maintained among them, that his personal infuerce was very powerful and extensive. During this

absence,

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absence, though he felt his paflion for Amelia increase, notwithitanding all his attempts to supprefs it; yet he never wrote to her, but contented himself with mentioning her in general terms, and including her in his remembrance of other friends, when he wrote to his father and his fifter.

When he returned, as his fifter's intimacy with Amelia still continued, his opportunities to see her were equally frequent : but the pleasure of those interviews were become yet more tumultuous and confused; and the lovers were both conscious, that their sentiments were every moment involuntarily discovered to each other.

Amelia had dismissed many suitors, who were not less distinguished by their merit than their rank, because she still hoped to enrich Eugenio with her fortune ; and Eugenio persisted in a conduct by which this hope was disappointed, because he would not degrade Amelia by an alliance with dependence and poverty. The objections of duty might, indeed, have been removed by obtaining the consent of Agreftis ; but those of honour would still have remained : he was not, however,

absolutely without hope; for though he had lost his uncle's fortune by obedience to his father, yet as he had greatly recommended himself to his commanding officer, who was of the highest rank, he believed it possible that he might be advanced to a poft in the army, which would justify his pretensions to Amelia, and remove all his difficulties at once.

Agrestis wondered at the conduct of his daughter, but neither asked nor suspected her motives! for he had always declared, that as he believed the would never

marry

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fidered him as my example : our friendship increased every day; and I believe he had conceived a design to follow me into orders. But when he had continued at college about two years, he received a command from his father to come immediately to town: for that his earnest desire to place him in the army was now accomplished, and he had procured him a captain's commillion. By the same post he received a letter from his uncle, in which he was strongly urged to continue at college, with prcmises of succeeding to his whole estate ; his father's project was zealously condemned, and his neglect of a brother's concurrence resented. Eugenio, though it was greatly his desire to continue at college, and his interest to oblige his uncle, yet obeyed his facher without the least hesitation.

When he came to town, he discovered that a warm altercation had been carried on between his uncle and his father upon this subject: his uncle, not being able to produce any effect upon the father, as a laft effort had written to the fon; and being equally offended with both, when his application to both had been equally ineffectual, he reproached him with folly and ingratitude ; and dying soon after by a fall from bis horse, it appeared, that in the height of his resentment, he had left his whole fortune to a distant relation, in Ireland, whom he had never seen.

Under this misfortune Eugenio comforted himself by reflecting, that he had incurred it by obedience to his father ; and though it precluded hopes that were dear er than life, yet he never expressed his displeasure e ther by invective or complaint.

Orgilio had very early in life contracted an intimac with Agreftis, a gentleman whose character and pri

ciples were very different from his own. Agrestis had very just notions of right and wrong, by which he regulated his conduct without any regard to the opinion of others: his integrity was universal and inflexible, and his temper ardent and open; he abhorred whatever had the appearance of difingenuity, he was extremely jealous of his authority, and there was a rough simplicity in his manner which many circumstances of his life had contributed to produce. His father left him a fortune of two hundred thousand pounds; but as the parfimony which enabled him to amass it, extended to the education of his son by whom it was to be poffesed, he had been taught neither politeness nor literature. He married a lady, whose influence would have polished the rough diamond by degrees; but she died within the first year of her marriage, leaving him a daughter to whom he

gave

her name Amelia, and transferred all his affection: he, therefore, continued to live in great privacy; and being used to have only servants and dependants about him, he indulged the peculiarities of his humour without that complaisance which becomes insensibly habitual to those, who mix in the company of persons whom it is their apparent interest to please, and whose presence is a perpetual restraint upon such irregular starts of temper as would incur contempt by arrogating a superiority which none would acknowledge. To this disposition his daughter accommodated herself grew up,

from motives both of affection and duty: as he knew and regretted the defect of his own education, he spared no cost to complete her's; and the is indeed the most accomplished character I ever knew : her obedience is cheerful and implicit, her affećtion tender and without parade; her looks express

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