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THE

1835–6.

CONDUCTED BY PHILIP DIXON HARDY, M. R. I. A.

AUTHOR OF "THE NORTHERN TOURIST," "PICTURE OF DUBLIN,” &c. &c. &c.

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DUBLIN: P, DIXON HARDY. LONDON: RICHARD GROOMBRIDGE.

TO OUR READERS.

In closing another, the Fourth Volume of our Journal, we have to appear before our readers with feelings of pleasure mingled with pain. We had hoped, from the success which attended the undertaking, to have had the satisfaction for many years to come of annually meeting our friends with the language of gratulation and kind regard ; but are now obliged to inform them, that while the Journal has prospered, and has attained a circulation very gratifying to our feelings, the hand of disease has so paralyzed our energies, and affected our general health, as to render it necessary that, for a considerable time to come, we should abstain from making any exertion in which the powers of the mind would be engaged, beyond what may be absolutely requisite in the management of a rather extensive printing and publishing establishment. With the present volume, therefore, must terminate the pleasant acquaintance which has been kept up with our very numerous body of readers during the last three years; and therefore it is that we appear before them with mingled feelings of pleasure and pain-pleasure, that we have been enabled to conduct our little work, so as in general to give them satisfaction ; pain, that just at a time when it appeared to be getting on more to our mind than it ever before had been our new machine having enabled us to work of the engravings in a better style, and other circumstances having also conduced to assist us—we should be reduced to the alternative of giving it up, or running the risk of sacri. ficing health, or a much more important and profitable department of our business. By some it may be thought, that we should have procured another person to carry on the Journal. To this we have a very definite reply : at the commencement of the work, as we once before linted, it was under the management of two very talented individuals--the one an antiquarian and first rate artist, the other a writer of acknowledged ability, and yet, at the close of the year, such was the state of the concern, that had we not taken it off the printer's hands, it would have made him a bankrupt, as it owed him at the time nearly £1700, with little prospect of getting any thing out of it. We mention this fact to show that it would be folly in us to risk a similar result, when we can now withdraw from the concern with a certain profit. For the information of those interested in such details we may here observe, that a publi cation of the kind, to succeed in this country, must be carried on by one individual, who will have the profits of Editor, Printer, and Publisher, to repay his trouble, and who can allow from £1500 to £2000 to remain in the concern. A circulation beyond 11,000 or 12,000 cannot be calculated on ; while the capital engaged is scattered over England, Scotland, and Ireland, in small sums, sometimes not very easily got in, even after the regular credit has expired.* As there is no alternative with us, it now

• We avail ourselves of this opportunity of stating, that should any individual think well of starting a similar publication, we can supply him on reasonable terms with a number of drawings taken expressly for the Journal by Mr. Nichol and Mr. Nelson ; also several Irish stories similar to those which have appeared in the work. We had intended in the commencement of our fifth volume to have given a series of views in Belfast and its neighbourhood ; these we shall publish separately, on fine paper, as soon as circumstances permit. We may also here state, that for a limited period any of the back Numbers of the Journal may be bad at the office, or of any bookseller in town or country, after which the work will only be sold in Parts and Volumes.

only remains to offer our best acknowledgments, to our various correspondents, and to those who have so long patronised and supported us in our efforts. We certainly do feel considerable satisfaction in reflecting, that we have been able successfully to carry on a publication, in Ireland, altogether free from party and politics, and in which there was nothing at any time admitted which could injure the morals or hurt the feelings of any individual or party. Indeed, the greatest regret we feel in giving it up at present is, that it has been a means of affording employment to many industrious individuals, some of whom (especially the wood engravers and writers of stories) will find it difficult in this country to procure exercise for their talents in any other quarter. We trust, however, that an impetus has been given to the publishing trade in this city, and that other works requiring illustration will from time to time supply any little deficiency which may be created by the stopping of the Journal. That there is very considerable talent in the country there cannot be a doubt; what we want in Ireland is a little more national and public spirit.

In closing our labours, as Editor, Printer, and Publisher of the Journal, we cannot but express our grateful acknowledgments to the literary press of England, from whom we have continued to receive the most flattering support; and we think it only just to state our conviction, that to the kind manner in which the work was recommended by the Editors of the Literary Gazette and Atheneum, we owe much of our success in the sister kingdom, as but for their friendly notices, it would scarcely have been known through England that such a publication as the Dublin Penny Journal had an existence; while even in our own land, their high recommendations induced many to look at it, who otherwise might have considered it beneath their notice.

PHILIP DIXON HARDY.

37, Stephen's Green, Dublin,

June, 1836.

... As considerable want of arrangement aná order must have been evident in several of our latter numbers, we feel it but justice to ourselves to mention, that what was written or arranged for the Journal for some months past, (“Mr. Barrow's Tour round Ireland" not excepted,) has been written or arranged during partial or extreme ill health. We have been enabled, however, to compiete the Volume, and presume to think, that the last will be found to be the best of any which has appeared. It contains much more valuable and useful information than any of the others; while the Stories, and various amusit. : articles, are of a more interesting and better description than those previously given.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

1835–36.

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46

255
318

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312

315

277

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ANECDOTES.

LEGENDS AND STORIES--continued.

Anecdote of a Raven

348 Eneas O'Hagan, the Irish Outlaw ...

359

Cat-aline Conspiracy

227 Faithful Lovers, the

Distressing Circumstance ... ...

False Step, the

Dumb Son of Cræsus ...

Ford of the White Ship ...

Trial of a Deaf and Dumb Woman for the Mu

Gamblers, the

der of her Child

Gleanings from the West ...

Melancholy Fate of a Young Lady born

Haunted Chamber, the ...

and Dumb ...

316 Incident of 1799

Jack-o'-the-Lantern

ANTIQUITIES.

Kate Connor

66

Ancient Bells

Kedagh and the Counsellor

237

101

Ancient Bronze Key

Laying a Ghost

237

218

Aneient Brooches, &c. .

Legend of Ossheen, the Son of Fion

92, 173

Ancient Gold Crescents ...

414

Lough Dearg

295

...

356

Ancient Irish Hand-mill or Quern ...

295

Mick Donnovan ...

Ancient Irish Harp ...

256

Old Frank and his Stories

154

Antiquities of the County of Down

97

Paddy Doyle's First Trip to Cork ...

Ancient Tobacco Pipes ...

Paul Dogherty's Visit to Squire Beamton's ...

162

Curious Inscription

Phantom Town, the

206

269

Relics of the Olden Times

Phelim M-Carthy

Pooka, the

CRITICAL NOTICES.

Proctor's Daughter, the ...

86

Rides through the County of Cork

100, 305

Address to the Members of the College Histo.

Romance of Irish History

381

rical Society

263

Rose Lacy's Marriage

282

Anecdotes and Annals of the Deaf and Dumb

Spaewoman and her Son

117

ANNUALS— Amulet

245

Tale of the Old Wars

233

...

Forget Me Not

206

Terence Ryley's Adventures

149

Friendship's Offering ...

185

The Biter Bitten

223

Juvenile Forget Me Not

193

The Dead Hand ...

260

The Squib ...

238

The Demon Nailer

292

The Comic ...

241

The Doomed Maiden

350

Barrow's Tour round Ireland

369

The Three Devils

366

-, (second notic 378

The Wedding Day

Catechism of Botany

342

Whiteboy, the

Catechism of Natural Philosophy ...

59

Christian Almanack

214 MISCELLANEOUS.

Comic Almanack

209

Advantages of History

Finlay's Miscellanies

353

Advantages of Memory

Genealogical Chart

275

A Flying Railway
History and Present Condition of the Barbary

A Pattern .

States ... ...

Body of Canute the Dane

248

History of Birmingham ...

Cacophony

245
Kevin's Bed. By Major Cosby ...

Contemplation of the Heavens at Night

67
Landscape Illustrations of the Bible

Contrast of the Condition of Deaf-Mutes and of
Landscape Illustration of Moore's Irish Melo

Hearing Children in Infancy and Childhood 315

Moore's History of Ireland

Decrease of Drunkenness in London

8

(second notice)

Degeneracy of Seedling Apple Trees

319

My Early Dreams. By Mary MʻD.

Description of the Morning

Naturalist's Library-

Druidism

Entomology, Vol. II.

56 Dyspepsia, or Indigestion

Ornithology, Vol. V. ..
156 Extraordinary Discovery ...

379
Mammalia, Vol. III.

249

Facts and Anecdotes illustrative of the Natural,

- Vol. IV.

331

Mental, and Moral Condition of the unedu-

Pic Nics from the Dublin Penny Journal 392 cated Deaf and Dumb ...

315

Sacred Harp of Ireland ...

Genius and Learning ...

Scenery of Ireland

Hair turning suddenly Grey

246

The Siudent's Cabinet Library of Useful Tracts

Hall of Tara ...

108

Traits and Stories of the Irish Peasantry

Injurious Effects of smoking Tobacco

104

Ireland as it was Fifty Years ago ...

91

LEGENDS AND STORIES OF IRELAND.

Irish Eloquence ...

106

Abduction of a Voter ...

Lord Nelson

348

Alley Sheridan, or the Runaway Marriage

Lost Books of the History of the Phenicians 304

389, 396, 402

Mortality ... ... ... ... 46
Boccagh's Curse, the

Moving Bog ... ...

163
Condy Cullen and the Gauger
197 New Holland ...

386
Darby Dooly and his White Horse ...

New Way to make Poetry
Deserter, the

Old Maids

96
Dhirro Dheerlha, or the Sleeping Warriors 364 On Poetic Composition ...

285
Duhallow Cowboy, the ...

Orrery in Trinity College, Dublin

173
Ellen Duncan ...

Pleasures of Hope

163

Eman Oge

310 Portrait of a Radical

355

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