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of the effect on his own mind.-- Another conséquence will be this; he will learn, for the first time, what is meant by the reproach of the world.'-Sermons, p. 57.

Here then is the true and the only infallible Teacher, the Holy Spirit, who guides unto all truth. For ever blessed be God, that he has promised such a Teacher, and given us the cheering, consoling, and delightful hope that he will instruct us.

The infinite goodness of God in vouchsafing such a teacher, will be the more clearly seen when remember that spiritual blindness is not merely a misfortune; it is a fault; it is seriously criminal. It is not owing to want of ability, for the most wise of this world are often spiritually foolish. It is not owing to want of instruction, for such as Judas had the best instruction ; but it is the perverseness of the heart, rejecting the divinely revealed description of the infinitely glorious God, hating his holy character, and preferring, from the love of sin, its own carnal conceptions and principles. Spiritual blindness alleges, as an excuse for our sin, the fact, that we have no disposition to love God, when it is in truth the extreme aggravation of our sin: Not love him who is infinitely amiable and lovely, how criminal the heart which is destitute of this love ! how yet more criminal he who justifies himself in sin, from the want of such love ! Yet this is our state by nature. And towards such hostile minds, God has showed the richest mercy; he commendeth his love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.

This divine teaching is quite distinct from, and superior to, a knowledge of the doctrines and system of Christianity. Spiritual ignorance is very consistent with doctrinal knowledge. Satan has doctrinal know

ledge, but he has no true apprehension of the divine glory, no relish for the divine beauty. He hates that which is good, because his own works are evil. We want an internal, spiritual sense, the gift of God, to discover to us the excellence of the divine nature.

Mr. Law puts this in a strong light when he remarks: • The empty letter learned knowledge which the natural man can as easily have of the sacred scriptures and religious matters, as of any other books or human affairs being taken for divine knowledge, has spread such darkness and delusion all over Christendom, as may be reckoned no less than a general apostacy from the gospel state of divine illumination. The best ability of the natural man can go no farther than talk, and notions and opinions about scripture words and facts : on these he may be a great critic, an acute logician, a powerful orator, and know every thing of the scripture except the spirit and the truth.' A man is not therefore the better able to receive and comprehend the great essential truths of Christianity in their real influence, because he is a great critic, or a great scholar. No illiterate man has farther wandered from the truth than have some great scholars. Divine illumination gives us to know truth in its holy influence, and in its real experience and enjoyment.

Witsius happily distinguishes the acquisitions of human intellect, and those arising from divine teaching: showing the infinite superiority of the latter, he says,

One who is a scholar of this heavenly academy, not only knows and believes, but has a sensible perception of what is remission of sins, and the privilege of adoption, and familiar communion with God, and the grace of the Spirit inhabiting the breast, and the love of the effect on his own mind.-- Another consequence will be this; he will learn, for the first time, what is meant by the reproach of the world.'-Sermons, p. 57.

Here then is the true and the only infallible Teacher, the Holy Spirit, who guides unto all truth. For ever blessed be God, that he has promised such a Teacher, and given us the cheering, consoling, and delightful hope that he will instruct us.

The infinite goodness of God in vouchsafing such a teacher, will be the more clearly seen when we remember that spiritual blindness is not merely a misfortune; it is a fault; it is seriously criminal. It is not owing to want of ability, for the most wise of this world are often spiritually foolish. It is not owing to want of instruction, for such as Judas had the best instruction; but it is the perverseness of the heart, rejecting the divinely revealed description of the infinitely glorious God, hating his holy character, and preferring, from the love of sin, its own carnal conceptions and principles. Spiritual blindness alleges, as an excuse for our sin, the fact, that we have no disposition to love God, when it is in truth the extreme aggravation of our sin: Not love him who is infinitely amiable and lovely, how criminal the heart which is destitute of this love ! how yet more criminal he who justifies himself in sin, from the want of such love ! Yet this is our state by nature. And towards such hostile minds, God has showed the richest mercy ; he commendeth his love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.

This divine teaching is quite distinct from, and superior to, a knowledge of the doctrines and system of Christianity. Spiritual ignorance is very consistent with doctrinal knowledge. Satan has doctrinal know

ledge, but he has no true apprehension of the divine glory, no relish for the divine beauty. He hates that which is good, because his own works are evil. We want an internal, spiritual sense, the gift of God, to discover to us the excellence of the divine nature.

Mr. Law puts this in a strong light when he remarks: “ The empty letter learned knowledge which the natural man can as easily have of the sacred scriptures and religious matters, as of any other books or human affairs being taken for divine knowledge, has spread such darkness and delusion all over Christendom, as may be reckoned no less than a general apostacy from the gospel state of divine illumination. The best ability of the natural man can go no farther than talk, and notions and opinions about scripture words and facts : on these he may be a great critic, an acute logician, a powerful orator, and know every thing of the scripture except the spirit and the truth. A man is not therefore the better able to receive and comprehend the great essential truths of Christianity in their real influence, because he is a great critic, or a great scholar. No illiterate man has farther wandered from the truth than have some great scholars. Divine illumination gives us to know truth in its holy influence, and in its real experience and enjoyment.

Witsius happily distinguishes the acquisitions of human intellect, and those arising from divine teaching : showing the infinite superiority of the latter, he says, • One who is a scholar of this heavenly academy, not only knows and believes, but has a sensible perception of what is remission of sins, and the privilege of adoption, and familiar communion with God, and the grace of the Spirit inhabiting the breast, and the love of God poured out in the heart, and the hidden manna, and the sweet love of Christ, and the earnest and pledge of perfect feiicity.'1

We depreciate not talent, and genius, and human industry, and learning, and accurate, elaborate, and comprehensive human knowledge. These have their office, and under divine grace they are of eminent and extensive use in the fulfilment of that office; but let

1 See Witsius de vero Theologo. 'In spirituali ac celesti Academia institutus Theologus, non modo genuinas rerum Diviniarum ideas in mente sua formare discit sed et ipsis illis rebus Divinis, inæstimabili sane thesauro, donatur. Non enim tanquam mera verba et nuda commenta ; non velut vana somnia, vel inania phantasmata a Spiritu doctore representantur sed tanquam solidæ et permanentes, ita loqui liceat, rerum substantiæ, in animam vere eas cognoscentem, introducuntur, omnibusque affectibus, ac toto cordis nisu recipiunturNon novit duntaxat, non credit solum, sed et sentit quandoque cælestis hujus academiæ alumnus, quid sit remissio peccatorum, et privilegium adoptionis, et familiare Þei commercium, et Spiritus pectori inhabitantis gratia, et amor Dei effusus in cor, et manna absconditum, et suavissimi Jesu oscula, arrhabo denique et pignus consummatæ felicitatis.'

The following remarks of Bishop Hall (quoted by Knox, Sect. I. of his Christian Philosophy) confirm and illustrate this statement, * There is not so much need of learning as of grace to apprehend those things which concern our everlasting peace; neither is it our brain that must be set to work, but our hearts. However excellent the use of scholarship in all the sacred employments of divinity, yet in the main act, which imports salvation, skill must give place to affection. Happy is the soul that is possest of Christ, how poor soever in all inferior endowments. Ye are wide, 0 ye great wits, while ye spend yourselves in curious questions and learned extravagancies. Ye shall find one touch of Christ more worth to your souls than all your deep and laborious disquisitions. In vain shall ye seek for this in your books if you miss it in your bosoms. If you know all things, and cannot say, I know in whom I have believed, you have but knowledge enough to know yourselves completely miserable. The deep mysteries of godliness, which to the great clerks of this world are as a book clasped and sealed up, lie open before him (the pious and devout man) fair and legible, and while those bookmen know whom they have heard of, he knows whom he has believed.'

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