A Manual of Applied Mechanics

الغلاف الأمامي
Charles Griffin and Company, 1872 - 648 من الصفحات
 

ما يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة

لم نعثر على أي مراجعات في الأماكن المعتادة.

المحتويات

tion by Rectangular Coordinates
40
Any system of Forces
41
Equilibrium of any system of Par
46
Application to any system of Forces
47
On Distributed Forces
48
Parallelogram of Forces
52
CONTENTS xi
64
its Composition and Iiesolution 96 Internal Stress in general
82
Simple Stress and its Normal In tensity
83
Resolution of Oblique Stressinto Nor mal and Tangential Components
84
Pair of Conjugate Stresses
85
Stressits Nature and Intensity
86
Classes of Stress
87
Resultant of Stressits Magni tude
88
Centre of Stress or of Pressure
89
Centre of Uniform Stress
90
Moment of UniformlyVarying StressNeutral Axis
91
i 104 Stress on three Rectangular Planes
92
Tetraedron of Stress
93
Stress Parallel to one Plane
95
Principal Axes of Stress Parallel to one Plane
98
Equal Principal StressesFluid Pressure
99
Opposite Principal Stresses com posing Shear
101
Ellipse of StressProblems
105
Combined Stresses in one Plane
110
Of the Internal Equilibrium of Stress and Weight and the principles of Hydrostat ics 114 Varying Internal Stress
112
GeneralProblemof InternalEqui librium
113
Equilibrium of Fluids
117
Equilibrium of a Liquid
118
Equilibrium of a Floating Body
120
Pressure on an Immersed Body
122
Apparent Weights
123
Relative Specific Gravities
125
Pressure in an Indefinite Uni formly Sloping Solid
126
On the Parallel Projection of Stress and Weight
127
THEORY OF STRUCTURES
129
Beam under Inclined Forces
134
Open Polygonal Frame
140
Compound Trasses
148
Halflattice Girder Umform Load
156
Transformation of Frames
162
Suspension Bridge with Vertical
168
Arches for Normal Pressure
189
Geostatic Arches
196
Pointed Arches
203
Friction distinguished from
209
81
211
Principle of Least Resistance
215
Table of Examples
221
SUbility at a Plane Joint
227
Stability of a series of Blocks Line of ResistanceLine of Pressures
230
Analogy of Blockwork and Framework
231
Structures
232
Frictional Stability of a Trans formed Structure
233
Abutments classed
235
Buttresses in general
237
Rectangular Buttress
238
Towers and Chimneys
240
Dams or Reservoirfrails
243
Retaining Walls in general
249
Rectangular Retaining Walls
253
Trapezoidal Walls
254
Foundation Courses of Retaining Walls
255
Arches of Masonry
256
Line of Pressure in an Arch Condition of Stability
257
Angle Jointand Point of Rupture
259
Thrust of an Arch of Masonry
260
Abutments of Arches
261
Groined Vaults
262
Clustered Arches
263
Tunnels
264
Domes
265
Strength of Abutments and Vaults268
268
Strength and Stiffness Section 1 Summary of General Principles 236 Theory of Elasticity
270
Liquid Elasticity
271
Strain and Fracture
272
Strength Ultimate and Proof ToughnessStiffnessSpring
273
Determination of Proof Strength
274
Divisions of Mathematical Theory of Elasticity
275
Displacements
276
Potential Energy of Elasticity
277
Isotropic Solid 257 Modulus of Elasticity 258 Examples of Coefficients
279
General Problem of Internal Equilibrium of an Elastic Solid
280
2C0 Ellipse of Strain
281
Ellipsoid of Strain
283
Cubic Elasticity 264 Fluid Elasticity 277 278 278 279 279 28ft L83 284 2B i
286
Resilience or Spring of a TieBar Modulus of Resilience
287
Additional dataWelded Joint Iron Wire RqpesHempen CablesLeather BeltsChain Cables
288
Thin Hollow CylindersBoilers Pipes
289
Thin Hollow Spheres
290
Cylinder of Strained Rings
294
Thick Hollow Sphere
295
Boiler Stays 29G 277 Suspension Rod of Uniform Strength
297
On Resistance to Shearing 278 Condition of Uniform Intensity
298
Explanation of Table of Resist ance of Materials to Shearing and Distortionsee Appendix
299
Fastenings of Timber Ties
301
On Resistance to Direct Compression and Crushing 282 Resistance to Compression
302
Limitations 806
306
Uniform Moment of Flexure
312
Section of Equal Strength
318
Proportion of the greatest Depth
327
Beam Fixed at both ends
333
Shearing Stress in Beams
339
Allowance for Weight of Beam
346
319a Hydrostatic Arch 853
353
Comparative Motion
358
Teeth of Wheels 859
359
82
364
Sides of Plate Iron Girders
365
Motions of PrimaryMoving Pieces
423
Motions of Connected Bodies
424
Train of Mechanism
425
Rolling Contact 457 PitchSnrfaces
426
Circular Cylindrical Wheels
427
BevelWheels 443 NonCircular Wheels
429
Sliding Contact
430
SkewBevel Wheels 445 Grooved Wheels or Frictional Gearing
431
Pitch and Number of Teeth
433
Hunting Cog
434
Trains of Wheelwork 450 Principle of Sliding Contact
437
lit Teeth of SpurWheels and Racks General Principle 452 Teeth described by rolling curves
438
Arc of Contact on Pitch Lines
440
Inside Gearing
441
Sliding of Involute Teeth
443
Epicycloidal Teethleast Pinion
444
Addendum for Epicycloidal Teeth
445
Teeth of Wheel and Trundle
447
Mr Sangs process for Describing Teeth
448
Teeth of SkewBevel Wheels
449
Normal and Circular Pitch
450
Screw Gearing
451
Wheel and Screw
452
Relative Slidingof Pair of Screws
453
Belts CordsChains454
454
Pitch Surface ofu Pulley or Drum
455
Length of an Endless Belt
456
Speed Cones
457
Linhcork 484 Definitions
458
Coupling of Parallel Axes
459
Eccentric
460
Hoolies Universal Joint
461
Double Hookes Joint
462
Velocity of any Ply 403
463
Whites Tackle
464
Hydraulic Press
465
On Aggregate Combinations
466
General Principles 466 506 Link Motion
468
Differential Windlass 466 5C7 Parallel Motions
469
First Law of Motion
476
Conditions of Uniform Motion
477
MS Compound Screws 467 I 508 Epicyclic Trains
478
Conservation of Energy
479
Energy of Component Forces and Motions
480
Definitions 521 Mass or Inertia
482
Variations and Deviations of Mo mentum
483
Relations between Impulse Energy and Work
484
General Equations of Dynamics
485
Absolute Unit of Force
486
Motion of a Falling Cody
487
Motion along an Inclined Path
489
Uniform Eftort or Resistance
490
Deviating Force
491
Revolving Simple Pendulum
492
Rectangular Components of De viating Force
493
Straight Oscillation
494
Elliptical Oscillations or Revo lutions
495
Simple Oscillating Pendulum
496
Cycloidal Pendulum
497
Residual Forces
498
Transformation of Energy 647 Actual Energy denned Vis Viva
499
Energy Stored and Restored 601
501
Energy due to Oblique Force
502
Reciprocating Force 53
503
Varied Translation if a System of Bodies 558 Conservation of Momentum
505
Angular Impulse Defined
506
Conservation of Angular Momen tum 50G 564 Actual Energy of a System of Bodies
507
Conservation of Internal Energy
508
Action of Unbalanced External Forces on a System General Equations
510
Determination of Internal Forces DAlemberts Principle
511
Rotations of Rigid Bodies
513
Motion of a Rigid Body in General Section 1 On Moments of Inertia Radii of Gyration Moments of Devia tion and Centres of Percussion 571 Mome...
514
Radius of Gyration
515
Examples of Moments of Iner tia and Radii of Gyration
517
Moments of Inertia found by Division and Subtraction 580 Moments of Inertia found by Transformation 681 Centre of PercussionCentre of Gyratio...
519
51
521
Angular Momentum
530
Energy and Work of Couples
537
61L Superposition of Small Motions
566
670
572
C38 General Laws of Fluid Friction
584
Mutual Impulse of Fluids
591
Centrifugal Pumps and Fans
597
Oscillations of Floating Bodies
603
517
604
General Principles 658 Useful and Lost Work 6 10
610
Mean Efforts and Resistances
611
Equations in terms of Compara tive Motion
612
Unguents
613
Friction of a Sliding Piece
614
Friction of a Pivot
616
Friction of Teeth
617
Frictional Gearing
618
Resistance of Railway Trains
620
Centrifugal Forces and Couples
621
Fluctuations of Speed
622
FlyWheel
623
Starting and StoppingBrakes
624
Prime Mover defined
625
WaterPressure Engines
627
Classes of Water Wheels
628
Turbines
629
Efficiency of Heat Engines in General
630
Tables of the Resistance of Materials to Stretching and Tearing II Table of the Resistance of Materials to Shearing and Distortion III Table of the Resi...
631
Table of Specific Gravities of Materials
637
Dimensions and Stability of the Great ney of St Rollox
640
633 633
642
610
648

طبعات أخرى - عرض جميع المقتطفات

عبارات ومصطلحات مألوفة

مقاطع مشهورة

الصفحة 211 - Friction is that force which acts between two bodies at their surface of contact so as to resist their sliding on each other, and which depends on the force with which the bodies are pressed together.
الصفحة 445 - ... or radius of the addendum circle, is the hypothenuse of a right-angled triangle, of which one side is the radius of the base circle CP, and the other is PI + the portion of the path of contact beyond I.
الصفحة 10 - The mathematician can easily demonstrate that a certain power, applied by means of a certain lever or of a certain, system of pulleys, will suffice to raise a certain weight. But his demonstration proceeds on the supposition that the machinery is such as no load will bend or break. If the engineer, who has to lift a great mass of real granite by the instrumentality of real timber and real hemp, should absolutely rely on the propositions which he finds in treatises on Dynamics, and should make no...
الصفحة 62 - ... constant. Let x,, y,, z, be the co-ordinates of the centre of gravity of a flat plate having its middle plane coincident with the given cross-section. Then, by reasoning similar to that of Articles 74 and 78, we find the following results for the whole body : — volume weight...

معلومات المراجع