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Art. 25. An Elegy on the much-lamented Death of George Lord Pigot. 4to. 1 s. 6d. Bew. 1778.

Dedicated to the brother of the late Lord Pigot; and fitter for the friendly than the critical eye..

Art. 26. Love Elegies. 4to. 2s. 6d. Kearfly.

As there are many good lines, and fome genius and fancy in these poems, we will not be offended with their faults. We fhall recommend it, nevertheless, to the Author to be offended with them, as much as he pleases.

L.

Art. 27. Fashion; a Poem: Addreffed to the Ladies of Great-
Britain. In Two Books. 410. 2 s. Williams.

This poem, too, contains feveral good verfes, and we fhall, there-
fore, connive at fome which do not come under that defcription.
Ubi plura nitent, &c. is a proper rule in candid criticifm. The fa
tire, however, we conceive, will be loft, as it is chiefly pointed at
the levities, the follies, and the feathers of the fair.
Art. 28. The Woman of Fashion; a Poem: In a Letter from
Lady Maria Modifh to Lady Belinda Artlefs. 4to.
Bew. 1778.
I s. 6 d.

L.

Another fatire on the follies and feathers of the fair, who, the Poet obferves, wear the feathers of the oftrich, and, like her, leave all their eggs for the fun to bring out.'

It is in the flyle of the Bath Guide poetry, and by no means with out humour.

L..

Art. 29. Verfes on the prefent State of Ireland. By a Lady. 4to.
I s. 6d. timfly.

We cay fay little for the poetry, but much for the humanity of this good Lady, who pleads ftrongly for the diftreffes of the Irish poor.

L.

Art. 30. An Elegy; written in Canterbury Cathedral, by John
Duncombe, M. A. One of the Six Preachers. 4to.
Dodfley.

Is 6d.

There is a fimplicity adapted to elegiac poetry which ought always to be kept in fight; at the fame time it fhould never fall into inelegancy of expreffion. That fault is feen frongly in this poem ; where we meet with many fuch lines as thefe :

Prelates who propp'd, or undermin'd the crown.

unharmonious ears.

Thither what crowds from every clime repair,
The fuck in body, the diftrefs'd in mind,

Peers, Prelates, Kings and all their weight of care,
By weightier gold aflifted, leave behind.'

The low expreffion, fuck in body, and the not lefs low conceit of
óright of care and weightier gold, are almoft beneath criticism.
• Difcord foon founds th' alarm-with clubs and ftones.
Fanatic zeal each mitred faint affails.

The poem is chiefly historical, and contains fome ftanzas which do the Author no difcredit.

L. :

Art.

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This the genius-this the language of the gallant Frazer!-No, 'tis a bafe counterfeit the ghost of a By-g,-or it is fome daftard foul, the body of which had been shot in the back.-S'death! if the real fpirit of General Frazer, now, perhaps, hovering, melancholy, over the fatal plain of Saratoga, could but hear of this poem, it would certainly waft itself back to Britain, and pull the Author by the nofe.

DRAMATIC.

Art. 35. Second Thought is beft. An Opera of Two Acts, per formed at the Theatre Royal in Drury Lane. Addreffed to R. B. Sheridan, Efq. By J. Hough, of the Inner Temple; in which is introduced, the Song rejected by the Lord Chamberlain. 8vo. ¿s. Murray. 1778.

A little piece, of very little merit. The fong rejected by the Lord Chamberlain excites fome curiofity:

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And do our best, and leave the rest,

To wiser heads, and better days.

This is the only thing remarkable in the piece; and, perhaps our Readers may wish that, like the Lord Chamberlain, the Reviewers had rejected it too.

LA W.

Art. 36. The Reports of Sir Edward Coke, Knt. in English. In Thirteen Parts, complete; with References to all the ancient and modern Books of the Law. Exactly tranflated, and compared with the first and laft Edition in French, and printed Page for Page, with the fame. To which are now added, the Refpective Pleadings in English. The whole newly revifed and carefully corrected, and tranflated, with many additional Notes and References. By George Wilfon, Serjeant at Law. 8vo. 7 Vols. 31. 135. 6d. bound. Rivington, &c. 1777. We barely announce this new edition, for the fatisfaction of fuch of our readers who follow the law;' to whom the nature and importance of the work is fufficiently known. REV. June, 1778.

"

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ARCHI

Art. 31. Appendix; containing fome Obfervations upon the Language of the Poems attributed to Rowley; tending to prove that they were written not by any ancient Author, but entirely by Thomas Chatterton. 8vo. 6 d. Payne.

How equal this Writer is to the task he has taken upon him will appear from a fingle paffage. Rowley fays,

And for a Bodekyn a Swarthe obfeyne.'

The critic fays, Bodekin [a word different from Rowley's] is used by Chaucer more than once to fignify a bodkin, or dagger. I know not that it had any other fignification in his time. Swarthe, ufed as a noun, has no fenfe that I am acquainted with.'

The fenfe is, and of a body become a ghot.' Bodykin for body, and fwarthe for a ghost have still a provincial exiftence; and as the word fwartbe in that fenfe, is peculiar only to the North of Eng land, a region which Chatterton never faw, it confirms us ftill more in our final decifion, that many of the poems afcribed to Rowley are certainly original.

To fwear by God's body was anciently a common oath, and the, qualified expreffion of Odds Bodykins is ftill in being. Art. 32. A poetical, fupplicating, modeft, and affecting Epifle to thofe literary Coloffufes the Reviewers. 4to. 1 S. Baldwin. As we know not of any Reviewers, except our own corps, we ap prehend this droll epiftle must be addreffed to us. We forgive the Author his fatire for the fake of his humour, and beg he would contribute to relieve the neceflities he defcribes: for it must be owned that we have appetites, though born on this fide the Tweed. Art. 33. Poetical Effays on religious Subjects. By a Clergyman. 4to. 2 s. Hogg. 1778.

1.

Very orthodox, pious, and good; we ufe the laft epithet in its devout fenfe, without any reference to the poetry. The Author has added fome little pieces, which are not termed religious of these take the following specimen:

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THE KING.

Three royal GEORGES let my muse recite;
The first, by all, the GREAT was deem'd,
The fecond was the GooD efteem'd,

But in the third, the GREAT and GOOD UNITE.

·

The Author is equally loyal and liberal to the Queen, and 'the Royal Family.'

Art. 34. The Spirit of Frazer to General Burgoyne. An Ode.

To which is added, The Death of Hilda; an American Tale. Infcribed to Mrs. Macaulay. 4to. I S. Bath printed, and fold by Goldfmith in London. 1778.

Of all the fpirits we ever converfed with, this is the most fpiritlefs. It perfuades General Burgoyne (who, it feems, took its ad vice) to yield the day to Gates:

• Reason's voice commands thee, yield:
Ev'n Frenzy's felf would fcarce oppose!
Tempt not the horrors of the field,
Nor brave furrounding foes l'-

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This the genius-this the language of the gallant Frazer!-No, 'tis a bafe counterfeit-the ghost of a By-g,-or it is fome daftard foul, the body of which had been fhot in the back.-S'death! if the real fpirit of General Frazer, now, perhaps, hovering, melancholy, over the fatal plain of Saratoga, could but hear of this poem, it would certainly waft itself back to Britain, and pull the Author by the

nofe.

DRAMATIC.

Art. 35. Second Thought is beft. An Opera of Two Acts, per
formed at the Theatre Royal in Drury Lane. Addreffed to R.
B. Sheridan, Efq. By J. Hough, of the Inner Temple; in which
is introduced, the Song rejected by the Lord Chamberlain. 8vo.
is. Murray. 1778.

A little piece, of very little merit. The fong rejected by the Lord
Chamberlain excites fome curiofity:

1.

The nation is in ruin Sir,

The nation is in ruin Sir;

I rave! I swear! Aghaft I ftare;
To fee fuch mifchief brewing, Sir.

II.
The conftitution is at stake,
The conftitution is at stake;
The form is near; I quake for fear!
The pillars at their centre fhake,
III.
For Britain's fafety, night and day,
For Britain's fafety, night and day,
I grieve, I pine, (fuch forrow's mine)
And fometimes faft, and fometimes pray.

IV.

Then let us loud our voices raise,
Then let us loud our voices raise,

And do our best, and leave the rest,

To wifer heads, and better days.

This is the only thing remarkable in the piece; and, perhaps our Readers may wish that, like the Lord Chamberlain, the Reviewers had rejected it too.

L A W.

Art. 36. The Reports of Sir Edward Coke, Knt. in English.
In Thirteen Parts, complete; with References to all the ancient
and modern Books of the Law. Exactly tranflated, and com-
pared with the first and laft Edition in French, and printed
Page for Page, with the fame. To which are now added, the
Refpe&ive Pleadings in English. The whole newly revifed and
carefully corrected, and tranflated, with many additional Notes
and References. By George Wilfon, Serjeant at Law. 8vo.

Vols. 31. 13 s. 6d. bound. Rivington, &c. 1777.

We barely announce this new edition, for the fatisfaction of fuch of our readers who follow the law;' to whom the nature and im

·

ARCHI

portance of the work is fufficiently known.
REV. June, 1778.

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