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something never to return any could not tell what I meant. She more.

went into an elderly flutter and I hope nobody will suppose I am palpitation, and appealed to young sentimentally minded-quite the re- A- whether she had been doing verse is the case. I resolved to take anything wrong. Actually the dear the management of the whole mat- old creature believed she had been ter into my own hands after this, flirting, and did not know what to and quite to exclude Arabella from say for herself. Was there ever anyhaving anything to do with it. In thing more absurd ? If I had been this spirit I got down at the pretty silent all day long, I assure you I new inn at Kenmore, got the most had the laugh on my

side now.

And charming rooms, a famous fire and so ended the day we spent in dogtea, without consulting anybody. carts, driving through the rain from Arabella came in looking a little Loch Awe to Loch Tay. I am ashamed of herself, and young A- merciful. I let Arabella off

. I said much amused, as was natural. Then no more about it; but I must say began a comical scene. I set their it was not for nothing that I spent enormities before them, as was pro- that day in silence with my umbrella per; and Arabella, poor old soul! up, seeing more hills and mists than with all the consciousness of guilt, I ever saw in my life, and put out began to justify herself. She de- of the way by my companions, unclared she had seen everything all der pretence of giving me the best along the way; she protested she seat, upon the driving-box.

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After the narratives of my fair who would grudge the trouble which friends, I need not enter into any gave those good creatures their inexplanation of the little difficulties nocent holiday. I don't mean to and hitches of the journey. The say I should be very ready to ungood old ladies enjoyed it, I don't dertake it again; but I don't regret doubt, in spite of all, and were the three days. as good friends as ever, like a pair And what a famous place Tayof old doves, the next morning, mouth is, when one gets a little when the missing sun presented sunshine to see it by! A beautiful himself, and we were at length able loch in front, quite by itself, and to set out with comfort on foot to unlike all the other lochs ; famous see the beautiful grounds of Tay- wood, unlimited shooting, and a mouth. I got along with them fa- princely size and style of place almously, I am glad to say, and was together. I should not mind going able, with a little trouble, to make down there on the 12th, or any myself agreeable in a way flattering period presently thereafter, at the to a fellow's self-regard who has chieftain's pleasure—nor, indeed, had his disappointments in the ser- of bestowing my leisure upon him, vice of woman, like most other peo- whenever he thinks fit to honour ple. The greatest bore in it all was me with an invitation. I don't when one happened to meet an ac- know a better specimen of comquaintance, and was led to mention, posed and sober grandeur; and with in a cursory way, that one was in all those beautiful glades and trees charge of a party of ladies, never about the trout in the Tay and thinking that the venerable com- the deer on the hill-a man might panions of one's voyage were about manage to be a Marquess without to sally forth, and dissipate at a feeling inevitably doomed to bore blow that agreeable illusion. But himself to death. I am not sure, indeed a man must be more hard- however, that I don't prefer the hearted than I can boast of being, Duke of Atholl's quiet cottage es

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SCOTLAND is once more upon her due on occasion the other side of trial. The poor old country bears the house ; and perhaps, while the a certain conjugal relationship to present world lasts, this condition of her richer neighbour, which is fruit- matrimony will last along with the ful of criticism. The amiable com- institution. In the happy espousals ments with which a man's family of the United Kingdom this amiable and relatives are apt to receive his human element never was wantwife, and accompany at intervals her ing; but there are occasions when it course through life, convey a lively takes special force. One of these idea of the manner in which the crises has just occurred, and the smaller and poorer country, received culprit stands once more at the bar. into reluctant equality with the Her assailants are threefold at least; larger, is assailed at the various and what with the sneers of a skirperiods of their joint career. Not mishing band of general literature, that the husband regrets his mar- the grave direct assault of the riage, or that any reference to Sir Historic Muse in its most serious Cresswell Cresswell looms darkly on development, and the insane detheir future fate, but only that fence which aids their efforts, our there is a certain relish in reporting respected and venerable parent, the follies of all the poor lady's suddenly brought to a standstill in sisters and brethren, and that her her respectable and busy career, own foibles show salient upon the and amazed at the face of battle calm background of domestic life. which she has done nothing to proSuch has been the luck of our voke, is in a position to call forth ancient kingdom. Wedded, not the sympathies of all her friends without boastfulness like many a and lovers. At the present moment, bride, she has had her struggles in when her mind is much more octhe new family relationship, which cupied with Highland expeditions has bound the hands but not the and country rambles than with tongues of the two spouses. The subjects less agreeable—when, bebest of married people are not fore the trees have browned, with no without a certain satisfaction in direful bondage of the season upon the possession of a ready taunt, her freeborn limbs, her thoughts which may either aggravate or sub- are bent upon the gleaming lochs

VOL. XC.--NO. DLI.

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tablishment at Dunkeld, where that ing and too - feeling acknowledgsame Tay makes nature beautiful. ments with which this parting was The drive down the valley (accom- accomplished. When the inexorplished, not in a dog-cart, but with able train plunged out of sight, one dignity in a carriage, where we of the kind creatures was bending were all inside, and 1—my modesty forward, her eager lips moving with will scarcely permit me to write the some last words; but my melanwords—was able to divide my at- choly fate prevented me hearing that tentions equally) was calm, but affecting message. With their heads agreeable. Neither the society nor full of lochs and mountains, mists the scenery were exciting; and the and torrents, and with, I am bound to exceptional character of yesterday's say, an amount of gratitude highly proceedings in the rain having sub- gratifying to receive, but which I sided into common comfort, no in- do not feel myself to have deserved in cident occurred worth mentioning. its full extent, my fair companions The feature of Dunkeld, as every- disappeared out of these latitudes; body knows, is the river; and no- and I went on my way rejoicing. body can possibly expect me to de- At this moment I sit in a very scribe that well-known scene. Ara- different scene, at a sunny window, bella might, but I doubt whether it overlooking, through half-cut openwould be to edification. The day ings in the trees, a distant scene of was calm, and, as I have said, not sea and city, too charming to be inexciting in its enjoyment, and the dicated more plainly—but at a nearevening was amicably spent in la- er point of vision, overlooking the mentations over our approaching lawn from which the battered but separation, and settling of the route bland face of that new denizen of by which the fair travellers were to polite society known as “ Aunt proceed when I left them the next Sally" beams upward benignant morning—a matter not concluded upon my thoughtful gaze. Last without trouble. The tendency night a little group of figures gathwomen have to go back upon their ered round that venerable vision. decisions, and reconsider the whole Ah me! can you imagine any rematter, is remarkable. I wonder if gion in the world to which one they carry it equally into all the would not wander joyfully in such arrangements of life.

company? The hand that poises Next morning I took my fair that skilful missile, dispenses fate friends into Perth, and placed them and fortune. Miss Arabella was a in the railway carriage which was judge more lenient. I was someto convey them back into the bo- body while I was the champion and soms of their families. I will not guard of the dear old ladies. A attempt to describe the trembling creature of eighteen is competent lip, the suppressed sigh, the falter- to put her yoke upon me now.

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*

I add a note. I recall the concluding word of the penultimate paragraph above. A week has come and gone since I bade farewell to the companions of these three days. Ever after-day by day-even amid the excitement of Aunt Sally and Louisa's smiles, their memory has come back to me with a gratefulness of tenderly lingering fancy that does not diminish, but is increasing still. I bless the day Í started on our tour. I bless the day of the dog-carts. Blessed among all days be the day spent between Taymouth and Dunkeld. Instead of going, like Christian, on my way rejoicing," as rashly stated above, I recall the souvenir of Lord Ullin, which our first day's voyage brought to mind, and say, that on the last of that eventful pilgrimage I was, like him, “ left lamenting." No more.

66

Printed by William Blackwood & Sons, Edinburgh.

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SCOTLAND is once more upon her due on occasion the other side of trial. The poor old country bears the house; and perhaps, while the a certain conjugal relationship to present world lasts, this condition of her richer neighbour, which is fruit matrimony will last along with the ful of criticism. The amiable com- institution. In the happy espousals ments with which a man's family of the United Kingdom this amiable and relatives are apt to receive his human element never was wantwife, and accompany at intervals her ing ; but there are occasions when it course through life, convey a lively takes special force. One of these idea of the manner in which the crises has just occurred, and the smaller and poorer country, received culprit stands once more at the bar. into reluctant equality with the Her assailants are threefold at least; larger, is assailed at the various and what with the sneers of a skirperiods of their joint career. Not mishing band of general literature, that the husband regrets his mar- the grave direct assault of the riage, or that any reference to Sir Historic Muse in its most serious Cresswell Cresswell looms darkly on development, and the insane detheir future fate, but only that fence which aids their efforts, our there is a certain relish in reporting respected and venerable parent, the follies of all the poor lady's suddenly brought to a standstill in sisters and brethren, and that her her respectable and busy career, own foibles show salient upon the and amazed at the face of battle calm background of domestic life. which she has done nothing to proSuch has been the luck of our voke, is in a position to call forth ancient kingdom. Wedded, not the sympathies of all her friends without boastfulness like many a and lovers. At the present moment, bride, she has had her struggles in when her mind is much more octhe new family relationship, which cupied with Highland expeditions has bound the hands but not the and country rambles than with tongues of the two spouses. The subjects less agreeable—when, bebest of married people are not fore the trees have browned, with no without a certain satisfaction in direful bondage of the season upon the possession of a ready taunt, her freeborn limbs, her thoughts which may either aggravate or sub-are bent upon the gleaming lochs

VOL. XC.NO. DLI.

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