De Vere as Shakespeare: An Oxfordian Reading of the Canon

الغلاف الأمامي
McFarland, 24‏/12‏/2014 - 280 من الصفحات
The question may be met with chagrin by traditionalists, but the identity of the Bard is not definitely decided. During the 20th century, Edward de Vere, the most flamboyant of the courtier poets, a man of the theater and literary patron, became the leading candidate for an alternative Shakespeare. This text presents the controversial argument for de Vere's authorship of the plays and poems attributed to Shakespeare, offering the available historical evidence and moreover the literary evidence to be found within the works. Divided into sections on the comedies and romances, the histories and the tragedies and poems, this fresh study closely analyzes each of the 39 plays and the sonnets in light of the Oxfordian authorship theory. The vagaries surrounding Shakespeare, including the lack of information about him during his lifetime, especially relating to the "lost years" of 1585-1592, are also analyzed, to further the question of Shakespeare's true identity and the theory of de Vere as the real Bard.

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De Vere as Shakespeare: an Oxfordian reading of the canon

معاينة المستخدمين  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This is a compilation of current studies positing that Edward de Vere, Earl of Oxford, is the real author of the Shakespeare canon rather than Will Shakespeare of Stratford-on-Avon. Yet Farina, a ... قراءة التقييم بأكمله

الصفحات المحددة

المحتوى

Conclusion
237
Notes
241
Bibliography
263
Index
265
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الصفحة 163 - O'errun and trampled on : then what they do in present, Though less than yours in past, must o'ertop yours ; For time is like a fashionable host, That slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand, And with his arms outstretch'd, as he would fly, Grasps in the comer : welcome ever smiles, And farewell goes out sighing.
الصفحة 58 - The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report what my dream was.
الصفحة 188 - Here comes his body, mourned by Mark Antony: who, though he had no hand in his death , shall receive the benefit of his dying, a place in the commonwealth ; As which of you shall not ? With this I depart ; That, as I slew my bes't lover" for the good of Rome, I have the same dagger for myself, when it shall please my country to need my death.
الصفحة 38 - If thou art rich, thou'rt poor; for, like an ass whose back with ingots bows, thou bear'st thy heavy riches but a journey, and death unloads thee.
الصفحة 34 - Now laws remain in credit not because they are just, but because they are laws. That is the mystic foundation of their authority; they have no other.
الصفحة 230 - And peace proclaims olives of endless age. Now with the drops of this most balmy time My love looks fresh, and Death to me subscribes, Since, spite of him, I'll live in this poor rhyme, While he insults o'er dull and speechless tribes: And thou in this shalt find thy monument, When tyrants' crests and tombs of brass are spent.
الصفحة 234 - Was it the proud full sail of his great verse, Bound for the prize of all too precious you, That did my ripe thoughts in my brain inhearse, Making their tomb the womb wherein they grew? Was it his spirit, by spirits taught to write Above a mortal pitch, that struck me dead? No, neither he, nor his compeers by night Giving him aid, my verse astonished. He, nor that...

نبذة عن المؤلف (2014)

William Farina has written books on Arthurian legend, early Christianity, the American Civil War, Shakespeare and baseball. He lives in Chicago and works as a real estate consultant for the federal government.

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