A History of Rome: From the Earliest Times to the Establishment of the Empire. With Chapters on the History of Literature and Art

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Harper, 1857 - 768 من الصفحات
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الصفحة 72 - When winds are blowing strong. The traveller slaked His thirst from rill or gushing fount, and thanked The Naiad. Sunbeams, upon distant hills Gliding apace, with shadows in their train, Might, with small help from fancy, be transformed Into fleet Oreads sporting visibly.
الصفحة 73 - The intelligible forms of ancient poets, The fair humanities of old religion, The Power, the Beauty, and the Majesty, That had their haunts in dale, or piny mountain, Or forest by slow stream, or pebbly spring, Or chasms and wat'ry depths ; all these have vanished. They live no longer in the faith of reason...
الصفحة 275 - Romans had recovered in some measure from their late disasters, but not so entirely but that they might be glad to listen to fair terms. Accordingly an embassy was dispatched to offer an exchange of prisoners and to propose terms on which a peace might be concluded. Regulus (according to the well-known story) accompanied this embassy, under promise to return to Carthage if the purposes of the embassy should fail When he arrived at Rome he refused to enter the walls and take his place in the Senate,...
الصفحة 564 - Being brought out into the arena to fight with wild beasts, rather than make sport for their conquerors, they slew one another at the foot of the altars which stood there ; and Satyrus, being left alone, fell upon his own sword. It is manifest, from the humanity and discipline observed by these unhappy men in their power, that their chiefs must have been originally men of station and education, reduced to slavery by the horrid practice of ancient warfare. The story of their death presents a picture...
الصفحة 251 - Tribes had been successively increased to three-and-thirty. These Tribes included a district beyond the Tiber stretching somewhat further than Veii ; a portion of the Sabine and ./Equian territory beyond the Anio ; with part of Latium, part of the Volscian country, and the coast-land as far as the Liris, southward. None but persons enrolled on the lists of these Tribes had a vote in the Popular Assemblies or any share in the government and legislation of the City.
الصفحة 730 - ... the impression her character made upon the Roman poets of the time. No meditated praises could have borne such testimony to her greatness as the lofty strain in which Horace celebrates her fall, and congratulates the Roman world on its escape from the ruin which she was threatening to the Capitol.
الصفحة 479 - In the autumn ten Commissioners arrived, as usual, with draughts of Decrees for settling the future condition of Macedon and Greece. Polybius, who had returned from witnessing the conflagration of Carthage just in time to behold that of Corinth, had the melancholy satisfaction of being called to their counsels, — a favour which he owed to the influence of Scipio. A wretched sycophant proposed to the Commissioners to destroy the statues of Aratus and...
الصفحة 728 - But about noon a breeze sprang up from the west ; and Cleopatra, followed by sixty Egyptian ships, made sail in a southerly direction. Antony immediately sprang from his ship of war into a light galley and followed. Deserted by their commander, the captains of Antony's ships continued to resist desperately ; nor was it till the greater part of them were set on fire that the contest was decided. Before evening closed the whole fleet was destroyed ; most of the men and all the treasure on board perished....
الصفحة 479 - Diseus fled into one gate of Corinth and out of another without attempting further resistance. The Romans might have entered the city that same day ; but seeing the strength of the Acropolis, and suspecting treachery, Mummius held back, and twenty-four hours elapsed before he took possession of his unresisting prey. But the city was treated as if it had been taken by assault ; the men were put to the sword, the women and children reserved to be sold by auction. All treasures, all pictures, all the...
الصفحة 721 - These complicated disasters roused Antony from his lethargy. He sailed to Tyre, intending to take the field against the Parthians; but the season was too far advanced, and he therefore crossed the ^Egean to Athens, where he found Fulvia and his brother, accompanied by Pollio, Plancus, and others, all discontented with Octavian's government. Octavian was absent in Gaul, and their representation of the state of Italy encouraged him to make another attempt. Late in the year (41) Antony formed a league...

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