Vietnam and America: A Documented History

الغلاف الأمامي
Marvin E. Gettleman, Jane Franklin, Marilyn B. Young, H. Bruce Franklin
Grove Press, 1995 - 560 من الصفحات
No single event since World War II has marked this country s foreign policy and national image as deeply as did the war in Vietnam. Vietnam and America is a complete history of the war, as documented in essays by leading experts and in original source material. With generous selections from the documentary records, the book dispels distortions and illuminates in depth the many facets of the war, from Vietnam s history before the war, to Washington s insider policy making, to troop perspectives, to the impact back on the home front. In essays introducing each major stage of the war, the editors elucidate the issues, foreign policy choices, and consequences of U.S. involvement. Substantial headnotes put each document in historical perspective. This comprehensive anthology is an invaluable reference for anyone who wants to understand the Vietnam War."
 

ما يقوله الناس - كتابة مراجعة

Vietnam and America: a documented history

معاينة المستخدمين  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The editors of this important anthology participated in the "teach-in'' movement of 1965, which mobilized the academic community against U.S. policy in Vietnam. Patterned after Gettleman's bestselling ... قراءة التقييم بأكمله

الصفحات المحددة

المحتويات

Editors Introduction
3
1 Vietnams Revolutionary Tradition
4
2 First Appeal to the United States June 18 1919
18
3 The Path Which Led Me to Leninism 1960
20
4 Founding of the DocLap Dong Minh Hoi June 1941
22
5 Imperial Abdication August 1945
24
6 Vietnam Declaration of Independence September 2 1945
26
The War with France
29
The US Government White Paper of 1965
255
36 Refutation of the White Paper
268
Report to the National Assembly of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam 1965
274
38 Negotiations? Hanois Four Points April 8 1965 and Washingtons Fourteen Points January 7 1966
276
39 US Crisis Managers Choose from Among Diminishing Options 1965
279
The Movement Against the War
293
Editors Introduction
295
40 We Wont Go
301

Editors Introduction
31
Origins of US Involvement
32
Two State Department Views April 1945
41
Cable to President Harry S Truman October 17 1945
46
10 FrancoVietnamese Agreement on the Independence of Vietnam March 1946
47
The State Department Decision May 1950
49
Two American Views 1954
50
Dien Bien Phu 1954
53
GenevaThe Peace Subverted
63
Editors Introduction
65
14 The Geneva CeaseFire July 20 1954
66
15 Final Declaration of the Geneva Conference July 21 1954
74
16 Close of the Geneva Conference July 21 1954
76
Tactics After Geneva
81
18 Heroin and Politics in Saigon
97
19 Elections and Reunification Denied 1955
103
20 Vietnams Democratic OneMan Rule
105
US Endorsement with Conditions of Ngo Dinh Diem 1954
113
22 Genesis of US Support for the Regime of Ngo Dinh Diem
115
The Revolution Against Diem
131
Editors Introduction
133
23 Behind the Miracle of South Vietnam
135
Law 1059
156
American Commitment to South Vietnam 1961
161
Origin of the National Liberation Front in Ben Tre
165
27 Founding Program of the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam
188
28 The Political and Military Line of Our Party
193
PolicyPlanning for Counterinsurgency 1962
201
19611964
205
The View from Washington
216
The US Embassy in Saigon Orchestrates a Coup dEtat 1963
225
The Americanization of the War
237
Editors Introduction
239
33 The Blueprint for an Americanized War 19631964
241
34 The Gulf of Tonkin Incidents and Resolution 1964
248
41 Freedom Draft Card
302
Afterthoughts on a NapalmDrop on Jungle Villages near Haiphong and Truth Blazes Even in Little Childrens Hearts
303
43 Declaration of Conscience Against the War in Vietnam 1965
305
44 We RefuseOctober 16 1967
306
45 A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority 1967
308
46 Declaration of Independence from the War in Vietnam April 1967
310
47 Deserters Manifesto 1968
319
48 Constraints of the Negro Civil Rights Movement on American Military Effectiveness 1970
321
49 The Collapse of the Armed Forces 1971
326
The Decisive Year 1968
337
Editors Introduction
339
50 The Year of Decision1968
342
51 Remembering the Tet Offensive
359
52 The Aftermath of Tet
378
Address to the Nation March 31 1968
401
54 What Happened at My Lai?
410
Nixons War and the Aftermath
425
Editors Introduction
427
The NLFs Ten Points May 8 and Nixons Eight Points May 14
430
56 Vietnamization November 3 1969
434
57 Explaining the Secret War in Laos March 6 1970
445
58 Rationale for the Invasion of Cambodia April 30 1970
451
Testimony to the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee April 22 1971
455
60 The Ecological Impact of the Air War
462
The Paris Peace Accords January 27 1973
471
Letter to DRV Prime Minister Pham Van Dong February 1 1973
487
63 War Powers Resolution 1973
489
An Account of the Liberation of South Vietnam 1975
495
65 The Last Chapter?
500
The Vietnam War in American Memory
515
Appendices
523
B Glossary
533
C Select Bibliography
539
Index
545
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حول المؤلف (1995)

Marilyn B. Young was born Marilyn Blatt in Brooklyn, New York on April 25, 1937. She received a bachelor's degree in history from Vassar College in 1957 and a doctorate from Harvard University. In 1968, her dissertation became her first book The Rhetoric of Empire: American China Policy, 1895-1901. She also wrote The Vietnam Wars, 1945-1990. She was a longtime professor at New York University. She died from complications of breast cancer on February 19, 2017 at the age of 79.

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