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Rowntree's figures with regard to the primary poverty in York as fairly representative of the whole kingdom, we should have about five millions of people who are members of families that have incomes insufficient to maintain merely physical efficiency. This is the class that breeds the weak, the unfit, in a word the residuum. Many of its members, it is true, would not be capable of earning even the low minimum suggested by Mr. Rowntree. These would become the unemployable. To the others, the largest proportion, an increased wage would give the increased mental and physical vitality which are a nation's real capital. The manufacture of human wreckage by the process of semi-starvation would be in great part checked and controlled. Indirectly the classes above this lowest would benefit. There would be a gradual growth in the national dividend, arising from the greater power of production due to the increase of physical efficiency, and the share of each grade and each trade in the dividend would be increased accordingly. A Minimum Wage Law cannot cure the evils which arise from the foolish spending of incomes small or great, but it would act as a palliative of those evils which arise from the existence of incomes that are insufficient for the barest necessaries of life.

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PROGRESS

CIVIC, SOCIAL, INDUSTRIAL.
THE QUARTERLY ORGAN OF THE INSTITUTE.

Published on the Fifteenth of January, April, July, and October. Each issue of PROGRESS contains, in addition to interesting articles, a Bibliography and List of Magazine References for the preceding three months, which are invaluable for Students of Social Questions.

For further informatron about the Institute or Progress, write to

B. I. S. S., 11, SOUTHAMPTON ROW, W.C.

PREFATORY NOTE.

The following list of books is a supplement to the fourth edition of “What to Read" (Tract No. 29; 6d. n.), published in October, 1901. The books are classified under almost the same headings, and in some cases headings are inserted without books in order to indicate that the editors have nothing to add to the earlier list. The books catalogued consist of publications since October, 1901, and only in one or two cases, for special reasons, are older books or new editions mentioned. A small number of the more important Blue-books are added at the end of the sections concerned.

The editors cannot pretend to have read or examined every book in the list, and occasionally they may have placed books under wrong headings, owing to the practice, unfortunately common with authors, of using misleading or vague titles.

The books selected are those likely to be required by Socialists and Social Reformers, and for this reason the completeness of the lists greatly varies. For example, under Free Trade, only a dozen volumes are named out of the hundreds published, whilst under Socialism all books of any permanent importance are (or should be) included.

Finally, the editors desire to say that, although on the subjects named they have used every endeavor to mention all the books suitable in respect of price and contents for the class of reader contemplated-that is, for those who do not desire very recondite, or, unless absolutely indispensable, very expensive, books—they cannot hope that there are no omissions, and that every book named is rightly included.

INDEX OF AUTHORS.

A-Acton, II. Acworth, 16. Adams, 13. Addams, 6. Alden, 18. Alston, 10.

Amery, 15. Andrews, 11. Armitage Smith, 9. Ashbee, 16. Ashley, P., 9, 1o.

Ashley, W. J., 9, 11, 12. Ashley, R. L., 15. Atkins, 15. Atkinson, 10.
B--Bax, 16. Best, II. Binns, 5. Blackburn, 18, 19. Bland, 17. Blatchford, 16.

Blauvelt, 6. Boies, 7. Böhm-Bawerk, 8. Bonn, 13. Bosanquet, 10. Boutmy, 15.
Bowles, 9. Bowley, 17. Boyle, 9. Brabrook, 9. Bradshaw, 8. Brooks, 16.
Bucher, 10. Burton, 12.

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