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Retire; - the world shut out; — thy thoughts call home
Rhyme the rudder is of verses
Rich and rare were the gems she wore
Riches I hold in light esteem :
Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky
Roll on, thou deep and dark blue ocean -- roll!
“Ruin seize thee, ruthless King!”
Sad happy race! soon raised and soon depressed
Sad is our youth, for it is ever going
Say, what is Honor? 'Tis the finest sense
Say, what is Taste, but the internal pow'rs
Scots, wha hae wi' Wallace bled
Seated one day at the organ
See, how the orient dew
See Lucifer like lightning fall
See through this air, this ocean, and this earth
Send home my long stray'd eyes to me
Shades of ev'ning close not o'er us
Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Shall I, wasting in despair
She dwelt among the untrodden ways .
She is far from the land where her young hero sleeps
She is not fair to outward view
She looks upon his lips, and they are pale
She rose – she sprung — she clung to his embrace
She saw a sun on a summer sky
She sleeps amongst her pillows soft
She stood breast high amid the corn
She walks in beauty, like the night
She was a creature framed by love divine
She was a phantom of delight
She was a Queen of noble Nature's crowning
She's gone to dwell in heaven, my lassie
Should auld acquaintance be forgot
Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more
Signior Antonio, many a time and oft
Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea .
Since our Country, our God - oh, my sire! .
Since there's no help, come let us kiss and part
Sing the old song, amid the sounds dispersing
Sing them upon the sunny hills
Sleep, baby, sleep! what ails my dear
Sleep, little baby, sleep!
Sleep on, my mother! sweet and innocent dreams
Slow sinks, more lovely ere his race be run
So all day long the noise of battle rollid
So dear to Heav'n is saintly chastity
So ended Saturn; and the God of the Sea
So forth issued the Seasons of the year
So on he fares, and to the border comes
Soe feeble is the thred that doth the burden stay
Soft you; a word or two before you go
Soldier, wake – the day is peeping
Some love is light and fleets away
Some say the soul's secure
Some to Conceit alone their taste confine.
Souls of poets dead and gone
Sound the loud timbrel o'er Egypt's dark sea!
Stars! your balmiest influence shed!
Stern daughter of the voice of God!
Still must my partial pencil love to dwell
Still to be neat, still to be drest
Stop, Mortal! Here thy brother lies
Strength too — thou surly, and less gentle boast
Strong Son of God, immortal Love
Sweet and low, sweet and low

PAGE.
Edward Young

123
Samuel Butler

102
Thomas Moore

368
Emily Brontë

569
Alfred Tennyson

543
George Gordon, Lord Byron 419
Thomas Gray

179
George Crabbe

223
Aubrey Thomas De Vere

561
William Wordsworth

289
Mark Akenside

166
Robert Burns.

245
Adelaide Anne Procter

585
Andrew Marvell

104
John Keble

439
Alexander Pope

142
John Donne

18
Thomas Haynes Bayley

486
William Shakespeare

57
George Wither

62
William Wordsworth

265
Thomas Moore

369
Hartley Coleridge

481
William Shakespeare

56
George Gordon, Lord Byron 421
James Hogg

260
Bryan Waller Procter
Thomas Hood

490
George Gordon, Lord Byron

430
Sir Henry Taylor

496
William Wordsworth

269
Hartley Coleridge

480
Allan Cunningham
Robert Burns .

233
William Shakespeare

44
William Shakespeare

41
William Shakespeare
George Gordon, Lord Byron 431
Michael Drayton
Aubrey Thomas De Vere 561
Felicia Hemans

461
George Wither

61
Caroline Bowles (Mrs. Southey) 344
Mary Russell Mitford

399
George Gordon, Lord Byron 422
Alfred Tennyson

534
John Milton
John Keats

469
Edmund Spenser
John Milton

82
Sir Thomas Wyatt
William Shakespeare

48
Walter Scott
William Motherwell

482
Samuel Butler
Alexander Pope

129
John Keats

477
Thomas Moore

378
Percy Bysshe Shelley

442
William Wordsworth

273
Samuel Rogers

255
Ben Jonson

7
Ebenezer Elliott

385
Robert Blair
Alfred Tennyson

542
Alfred Tennyson

539

398

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546

Sweet Auburn! loveliest village of the plain
Sweet Auburn! parent of the blissful hour
Sweet bird, that sing'st away the early hours
Sweet daughter of a rough and stormy sire
Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright
Sweet Echo, sweeter nymph, that liv'st unseen
Sweet floweret, pledge o' meikle love
Sweet Highland Girl, a very shower
Sweet is the rose, but grows upon a brere
Sweet is the ship that under sail
“Sweet is true love, tho' given in vain, in vain
Sweet maid, if thou would'st charm my sight
Sweet nurslings of the vernal skies
Sweetest love, I do not go
Swifter far than summer's flight .
Swiftly walk over the western wave
Take, O take those lips away
Tanagra! think not I forget
“Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean
Tell me not, sweet, I am unkind
Tell me, on what holy ground
Tell me, thou soul of her I love .
Tell thee truth, sweet; no :
That day I oft remembered, when from sleep
That day of wrath, that dreadful day
That stubborn crew .
That which her slender waist confined
The Assyrian came down like the wolf on the fold
The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne
The blessed damozel leaned out.
The breaking waves dash'd high
The bride she is winsome and bonny
The castled crag of Drachenfels .
The Chough and Crow to roost are gone.
The curfew tolls the knell of parting day
The dead abide with us! Though stark and cold
The evening weather was so bright and clear
The fair breeze blew, the white foam flew
The fountains mingle with the river
The glories of our birth and state
The gowan glitters on the sward
The half-seen memories of childish days
The harp that once through Tara's halls
The harp the monarch minstrel swept.
The heart of man, walk it which way it will
The hours are passing slow
The isles of Greece, the isles of Greece!
The keener tempests come: and fuming dun
The King had deem'd the maiden bright .
The lake is calm; and, calm, the skies
The lawns are bright, the paths are wide
The lifelong day Lord Marmion rode
The little flow'rs dropping their honey'd dew
The longer life the more offence.
The lopped tree in time may grow again
The Lord my pasture shall

prepare
The lovely purple of the noon's bestowing
The matron at her mirror, with her hand upon her brow
The midges dance aboon the burn
The mind that broods o'er guilty woes
The Minstrel-boy to the war is gone
The moon is bleached as white as wool
The moon is up, and yet it is not night
The more we live, more brief appear
The news frae Moidart cam' yestreen .
The night was winter in his roughest mood

PAGE.
Oliver Goldsmith

182
Oliver Goldsmith

184
William Drummond

16
Mrs. Barbauld

217
George Herbert

65
John Milton

99
Robert Burns
William Wordsworth

270
Edmund Spenser

21
Charles Dibdin

227
Alfred Tennyson
Sir William Jones

219
John Keble

440
John Donne

17
Percy Bysshe Shelley

455
Percy Bysshe Shelley

443
William
Shakespeare

55
Walter Savage Landor

353
Alfred Tennyson

540
Richard Lovelace

71
Samuel Taylor Coleridge . 324
James Thomson

153
Augusta Webster

607
John Milton

83
Walter Scott

297
Samuel Butler

IOI
Edmund Waller

64
George Gordon, Lord Byron 432
William Shakespeare

39
Dante Gabriel Rossetti

590
Felicia Hemans

459
Joanna Baillie

249
George Gordon, Lord Byron 413
Joanna Baillie

249
Thomas Gray

177
Mathilde Blind

615
John Keats

467
Samuel Taylor Coleridge. 317
Percy Bysshe Shelley
James Shirley
Joanna Baillie
Aubrey Thomas De Vere.
Thomas Moore
George Gordon, Lord Byron

430
Sir Henry Taylor
Andrew Lang .

609
George Gordon, Lord Byron 425
James Thomson

149
Walter Scott

311
Owen Meredith

594
H. E. H. King

605
Walter Scott

298
Michael Drayton

15
Sir Thomas Wyatt

6
Robert Southwell

30
Joseph Addisor

116
Letitia Elizabeth Landon

497
Thomas Haynes Bayley
Robert Tannahill

331
George Gordon, Lord Byron 404
Thomas Moore

372
Jean Ingelow.

592
George Gordon, Lord Byron

415
Thomas Campbell

362
Caroline Oliphant

257
William Cowper

450

33
250
560

368

496

486

202
456

478

.

.

540

396

78

The noble stag was pausing now
The path by which we twain did go
The path through which that lovely twain
The play is done, - the curtain drops,
The poetry of earth is never dead
The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling
The poplars are felled; farewell to the shade
The Public Faith, which every one
The quality of Mercy is not strain’d
The Sea! the Sea! the open Sea!
The seas are quiet when the winds give o'er
The silent heart, which grief assails
The soberest saints are more stiff-necked
The spacious firmament on high
The Spice-Tree lives in the garden green
The spirits I have raised abandon me
The splendor falls on castle walls
The stars are forth, the moon above the tops
The stars are with the voyager
The stately homes of England
The subtler all things are
The sun descending in the west
The sun grew low and left the skies
The sun had long since in the lap
The sun has gane down o'er the lofty Benlomond
The sun is warm, the sky is clear
The sun rises bright in France
The superior fiend
The time I've lost in wooing :
The tree many-rooted
The troops exulting sat in order round
The twentieth year is well nigh past
The voices of my home! — I hear them still!
The way was long, the wind was cold
The winds are high on Helle's wave
The world is still deceiy'd with ornament
The world is too much with us ; late and soon
The worst of rebels never arm
The year's at the spring
Then did the damsel speak again
Then, gazing, I beheld the long-drawn street
There are no bargains driven
There came to the beach a poor Exile of Erin
There he lay upon his back
There is a flower, a little flower
There is a land, of every land the pride
There is a legend in some Spanish book
There is a yew-tree, pride of Lorton Vale
There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet
There liv'd in gothic days, as legends tell
There often wanders one, whom better days
There's kames o' honey 'tween my luve's lips
There's not a joy the world can give like that it takes away
There's one great bunch of stars in heaven
There the voluptuous nightingales :
There was a sound of revelry by night
There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream
There was once a gentle time
There were two fathers in this ghastly crew
These are thy glorious works, Parent of good
These eyes, that now are dimm'd with death's black veil
These our actors
They grew in beauty side by side
They sin who tell us love can die
Thick lay the dust, uncomfortably white
Things said false and never meant .
Think you, a little din can daunt my ears?

PAGE.
Walter Scott

302
Alfred Tennyson

543
Percy Bysshe Shelley
William Makepeace Thackeray 548
John Keats
William Shakespeare

43
William Cowper

208
Samuel Butler

103
William Shakespeare

42
Bryan Waller Procter

401
Edmund Waller

64
Thomas Parnell

118
Samuel Butler

103
Joseph Addison

115
John Sterling

505
George Gordon, Lord Byron. 407
Alfred Tennyson
George Gordon, Lord Byron. 408
Thomas Hood

490
Felicia Hemans

499
Samuel Butler

103
William Blake

229
Samuel Butler

IOI
Samuel Butler

101
Robert Tannahill

330
Percy Bysshe Shelley

445
Allan Cunningham
John Milton
Thomas Moore

375
Algernon Charles Swinburne. 601
Alexander Pope

137
William Cowper

209
Felicia Hemans

460
Walter Scott

294
George Gordon, Lord Byron. 405
William Shakespeare

41
William Wordsworth

286
Samuel Butler

103
Robert Browning

555
Robert Southey

342
Elizabeth Barrett Browning 515
Samuel Butler

102
Thomas Campbell
Elizabeth Barrett Browning 519
James Montgomery

293
James Montgomery

293
E. Lee Hamilton

613
William Wordsworth

268
Thomas Moore

369
James Beattie

212
William Cowper

197
Allan Cunningham .

397
George Gordon, Lord Byron 432
Theophile Marzials

612
Percy Bysshe Shelley

456
George Gordon, Lord Byron 411
William Wordsworth

277
Rev. George Croly

383
George Gordon, Lord Byron 424
John Milton

84
William Shakespeare

53
William Shakespeare

38
Felicia Hemans

465
Robert Southey
Hartley Coleridge
Samuel Butler

103
William Shakespeare

44

358

338
481
476

528

This life, and all that it contains, to him .
This night presents a play which public rage
This relative of mine
This world is all a fleeting show
Those eyes, those eyes, how full of heaven they are
Those that write in rhyme still make
Thou art, O God! the life and light
Thou divinest, fairest, brightest
Thou fair-haired Angel of the Evening
Thou hast sworn by thy God, my Jeanie
Thou ling’ring star, with less'ning ray
Thou still unravished bride of quietness!.
Thou, to whom the world unknown
Thou wert fair, Lady Mary,
Thou youngest virgin-daughter of the skies
Though the day of my destiny's over
Though you be absent here, I needs must say
Three days before my Mary's death
Three fishers went sailing out into the west
Three Poets, in three distant ages born
Three years she grew in sun and shower
Thrice happy she that is so well assur'd
Thus far hear me, Cromwell
Thy spirit, Independence, let me share
Tiger, tiger, burning bright
Time rolls his ceaseless course. The race of yore
Tired Nature's sweet restorer, balmy sleep!.
'Tis but thy name that is mine enemy.
'Tis midnight: on the mountains brown
'Tis morn, and never did a lovelier day
'Tis sweet to hear
"Tis the last rose of summer
'Tis the middle of night by the castle clock
To be, or not to be, – that is the question
To fair Fidele's grassy tomb
To gild refined gold, to paint the lily
To kinder skies, where gentler manners reign
To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow
To-morrow, brightest-eyed of Avon's train
To sit on rocks, to muse o'er flood and fell
To the ocean now I fly .
To these, whom death again did wed
Toll for the brave!
Too much or too little wit
Touch us gently, Time!
Toussaint, the most unhappy of men!
Tread softly! bow the head
Tread softly here— for love has passed this way!.
“ Turn, Fortune, turn thy wheel and lower the proud”
Turn, gentle hermit of the dale"
'Twas at the royal feast for Persia won
'Twas at the silent, solemn hour
'Twas morn, and beauteous on the mountain's brow
Two lovers by a moss-grown spring
Two voices are there -- one of the sea

PAGE.
Sir Henry Taylor

4 yu
Samuel Johnson .

159
Frederick Locker

578
Thomas Moore

377
Lord Lytton

503
Samuel Butler

103
Thomas Moore

377
John Fletcher

35
William Blake

228
Allan Cunningham

397
Robert Burns .

244
John Keats
William Collins

168
Henry Alford
John Dryden

105
George Gordon, Lord Byron 434
Abraham Cowley

70
John Wilson

390
Charles Kingsley

572
John Dryden

114
William Wordsworth

269
Edmund Spenser

22
William Shakespeare

54
Tobias Smollett

102
William Blake

230
Walter Scott

304
Edward Young

124
William Shakespeare
George Gordon, Lord Byron
Leigh Hunt

387
George Gordon, Lord Byron 423
Thomas Moore

372
Samuel Taylor Coleridge 319
William Shakespeare

36
William Collins

171
William Shakespeare

49
Oliver Goldsmith

192
William Shakespeare
Walter Savage Landor

350
George Gordon, Lord Byron

410
John Milton

99
Richard Crashaw

73
William Cowper

205
Samuel Butler

103
Bryan Waller Procter

402
William Wordsworth

287
Caroline Bowles (Mrs. Southey) 345
A. Mary F. Robinson

621
Alfred Tennyson
Oliver Goldsmith

193
John Dryden
David Mallet

154
William Lisle Bowles

248
George Eliot
William Wordsworth

288

48
406

38

546

III

574

563

41
621

Under my window, under my window
Under the greenwood tree .
Unto the awful Temptress at my side
Up the airy mountain
Up with me! up with me, into the clouds!
Upon her head she wears a crown of stars
Upon the white sea-sand

Thomas Westwood
William Shakespeare
Philip Bourke Marston
William Allingham ·
William Wordsworth
Ben Jonson
Frances Browne

588

267

7
566

Valor's a mousetrap, wit a gin
Verse, a breeze ʼmid blossoms straying
Victorious men of earth, no more

Samuel Butler
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
James Shirley

102
322
33

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386
532

Waken, lords and ladies gay
War is the statesman's game, the priest's delight
We have been friends together
We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not breaths
We mind not how the sun in the midsky
We watch'd him, while the moonlight
We were two daughters of one race
Wedlock without love, some say
Wee, modest, crimson-tipped flow'r
Wee, sleekit, cow'rin, tim'rous beastie
Weep no more, nor sigh, nor groan
Well, then, I now do plainly see
What beck’ning ghost, along the moonlight shade
What bright soft thing is this
What constitutes a State?
What does little birdie say
What hidest thou in thy treasure-caves and cells
What is the meaning of the song
What is worth in anything
What shall I do to be forever known
What's fame? a fancy'd life in others' breath
What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted?
What time the groves were clad in green .
What was he doing, the great God Pan
What! wilt thou throw thy stone of malice now
What win I if I gain the thing I seek?
When all the world is young, lad
When Britain first, at Heaven's command
When by a good man's grave I muse alone
When by God's inward light, a happy child
When chapman billies leave the street
When coldness wraps this suffering clay
When he who adores thee has left but the name
When I am dead, my dearest
When I consider how my light is spent
When I consider life, 'tis all a cheat
When I have fears that I may cease to be
When I have seen by Time's fell hand defaced
When I shall be divorced, some ten years hence
When icicles hang by the wall
When Israel of the Lord beloved
When Learning's triumph o'er her barbarous foes
When love with unconfined wings .
When music, heavenly maid, was young
When o'er the hill the eastern star
When seven lang years have come and fled
When the British warrior queen
When the hounds of spring are on winter's traces
When the lamp is shatter'd
When the long-sounding curfew from afar
When the sheep are in the fauld, and the kye come hame
When Time, or soon or late, shall bring
When Time, who steals our years away
When twilight steals along the ground
When we two parted
Whence is that knocking ?
Where honor, or where conscience does not bind
Where lies the land to which the ship would go?
Where lies the land to which yon ship must go?
Where the pools are bright and deep.
Where the quiet-colored end of evening smiles
Where, then, ah! where shall poverty reside
Whether on Ída's shady brow
Who can mistake great thoughts?

Walter Scott

314
Percy Bysshe Shelley

457
Mrs. Norton

509
Philip James Bailey

566
Walter Savage Landor 354
Ebenezer Elliott
Alfred Tennyson
Samuel Butler

103
Robert Burns

242
Robert Burns.

243
John Fletcher

36
Abraham Cowley

69
Alexander Pope

137
Richard Crashaw

73
Sir William Jones

219
Alfred Tennyson

548
Felicia Hemans

464
Charles Mackay

559
Samuel Butler

103
Abraham Cowley

68
Alexander Pope

147
William Shakespeare

52
Michael Drayton
Elizabeth Barrett Browning . 516
Augusta Webster

боб
William Shakespeare

56
Charles Kingsley

572
James Thomson

153
Samuel Rogers

253
John Wilson

389
Robert Burns.

234
George Gordon, Lord Byron 431
Thomas Moore

367
Christina Georgina Rossetti 592
John Milton

95
John Dryden

113
John Keats
William Shakespeare
Matthew Arnold .

579
William Shakespeare

45
Walter Scott

315
Samuel Johnson

158
Richard Lovelace

70
William Collins

169
Robert Burns

246
James Hogg

261
William Cowper

211
Algernon Charles Swinburne.

599
Percy Bysshe Shelley

445
James Beattie

216
Lady Anne Lindsay.
George Gordon, Lord Byron. 428
Thomas Moore

365
Henry Kirke White

393
George Gordon, Lord Byron. 433
William Shakespeare

39
Abraham Cowley

68
Arthur Hugh Clough

571
William Wordsworth

284
James Hogg

262
Robert Browning

553
Oliver Goldsmith

187
William Blake

229
Philip James Bailey

566

.

.

478

58

220

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