A Southern Woman of Letters: The Correspondence of Augusta Jane Evans Wilson

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Univ of South Carolina Press, 2002 - 205 من الصفحات
Augusta Jane Evans Wilson (1835-1909) was one of nineteenth-century America's most popular novelists and outspoken supporters of the Confederacy. Her nine novels include the recently reissued Beulah, the stridently pro-Confederate Macaria, and the extremely successful St. Elmo, which rivaled Uncle Tom's Cabin and Ben-Hur in sales. In addition to writing best-selling books, Wilson was a powerful letter-writer whose correspondents included prominent Confederate leaders. Wilson's epistles, 112 of which are gathered in this volume, reveal the depth of her ambitions for herself and the Confederacy. Wilson worked hard to place herself at the center of action during the Civil War and after the surrender assiduously maintained her correspondence with prominent people of her day. In addition to writing Confederate propaganda, her wartime activities included an extended correspondence with General P. G. T. Beauregard and Confederate congressman Jabez L. M. Curry. In her letters Wilson reviews battle plans and military policy, offers political advice, and illumines the hardships suffered by southerners. Her correspondence portrays her as an assertive, well-educated woman who addressed powerfu
 

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Our glorious spring time
1
Thank God we are Southern women
27
These are dark hours
47
Amid the Sombre Shadows
72
Mobile is safe
96
all my proud fond hopes were slaughtered
107
The aching Southern heart
130
our quiet little home in Mobile
150
a heart so sad and lonely
174
Appendix Contract between Augusta Evans and Harper and Brothers
189
Bibliography
191
Index
199
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