Essays towards the history of painting

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الصفحة 143 - Cupid and my Campaspe played At cards for kisses — Cupid paid ; He stakes his quiver, bow and arrows, His mother's doves, and team of sparrows ; Loses them too ; then down he throws The coral of his lip, the rose Growing on's cheek (but none knows how) ; With these, the crystal of his brow, And then the dimple of his chin : All these did my Campaspe win. At last he set her both his eyes, She won, and Cupid blind did rise. O Love ! has she done this to thee ? What shall, alas ! become of me...
الصفحة 91 - The son of a woman of the daughters of Dan, and his father was a man of Tyre, skilful to work in gold, and in silver, in brass, in iron, in stone, and in timber, in purple, in blue, and in fine linen, and in crimson; also to grave any manner of graving, and to find out every device which shall be put to him, with thy cunning men, and with the cunning men of my lord David thy father.
الصفحة 143 - At cards for kisses — Cupid paid; He stakes his quiver, bow and arrows, His mother's doves, and team of sparrows ; Loses them too; then down he throws The coral of his lip, the rose Growing on's cheek (but none knows how), With these, the crystal of his brow, And then the dimple of his chin ; All these did my Campaspe win. At last he set her both his eyes, She won, and Cupid blind did rise. O Love! has she done this to thee? What shall, alas! become of me?* THE SONGS OF BIRDS. WHAT bird so sings,...
الصفحة 131 - ... solemnity of the scene, or subjected the painter, with the majority of his judges, to the imputation of Propriety of expression. — Sleeping Cyclops. insensibility. He must either have represented him in tears, or convulsed at the flash of the uplifted steel, forgetting the chief in the father, or in that state of stupefaction which levels all features and deadens expression. He might, indeed, have chosen a fourth mode ; he might have exhibited him fainting and palsied in the arms of his attendants,...
الصفحة 134 - ... once.' We find it adopted to express the grief of a beautiful female figure on a basso-relievo formerly in the palace Valle at Rome, and preserved in the Admiranda of S. Bartoli; it is used, though with his own originality, by Michael Angelo in the figure of Abijam, to mark unutterable woe; Raphael, to show that he thought it the best possible mode of expressing remorse and the deepest sense of repentance, borrowed it in the expulsion from Paradise, without any alteration, from Masaccio ; and...
الصفحة 166 - With patient thought, and faithful hand, he strove To blend with jealous rage maternal love. Behold Medea! Envy must confess In both the passions his complete success. Tears in each threat — a threat in every tear, The mind with pity warm, or chill with fear. The dread suspense I praise...
الصفحة 131 - They ascribe to impotence, what was the forbearance of judgment. Timanthes felt like a father. He did not hide the face of Agamemnon because it was beyond the power of his art...
الصفحة 131 - ... in that state of stupefaction which levels all features and deadens expression. He might, indeed, have chosen a fourth mode ; he might have exhibited him fainting and palsied in the arms of his attendants, and, by this confusion of male and female character, merited the applause of every theatre in Paris.
الصفحة 133 - I am not prepared with chronologic proofs to decide whether Euripides or Timanthes, who were contemporaries about the period of the Peloponnesian war, fell first on this expedient ; though the silence of Pliny and Quintilian on that head seems to be in favour of the painter, neither of whom could be ignorant of the celebrated drama of Euripides, and would not willingly have suffered the honour of this masterstroke of an art they were so much better acquainted with than painting, to be transferred...
الصفحة 132 - Agameruion bear his calamity as a man, he made him also feel it as a man. It became the leader of Greece to sanction the ceremony with his presence ; it did not become the father to see the daughter beneath the dagger's point. The same nature that threw a real mantle over the face of Timoleon, when he assisted at the punishment of his brother, taught Timanthes to throw an imaginary one over the face of Agamemnon. Neither height, nor depth, but propriety of expression, was his aim.

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