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ADDRESS TO OUR READERS.

The idea of a Preface to such a miscellaneous book as a Magazine seems almost absurd. Yet we willingly comply with an annual custom, which has some advantages. As a yearly manifesto of Editorial plans, after a journal has been established upwards of eight years, it is quite unnecessary, but as a somewhat social communication with our readers, and a brief advertence to some points of general interest, it is pleasant on both sides.

We had hoped the Specimens inserted in other Periodicals would have brought a considerable accession to our circulation ; it was, however, but small; and we would, therefore, remind our readers that we still need their kind aid in extending the number of subscribers, and, indeed, in retaining our present standing, since deaths, removals, &c. would of course soon actually diminish our present number. So far as we can ascertain, " The Church,” unlike some penny periodicals, is circulated almost exclusively amongst those who pay for it. At the same time it is zeldom taken in great numbers by any church or congregation, unless some one undertakes to obtain and distribute them. The poor, especially in country places, are not in the habit of ordering periodicals, though glad to pay for them if they are procured for them. Wherever a minister or other intelligent christian undertakes this, the number sold is increased many-fold immediately. This indicates the kind of aid needed in our humble effort to do good to the many.

The Notes of Mr. Foster's Sermons, which we have found to be so highly prized, are finished. We have been promised more from another quarter, which we hope soon to receive; these will either be published in a cheap volume with the others, and with some already published in the Baptist Record, or they will appear first in “ The Church.”

We have always regretted that our large circulation compelled our going to press too early to avail ourselves or the Missionary Intelligence for the month, as we should feel it a privilege to aid in any way our invaluable Society. Our readers will see, by our advertisement, that the Juvenilė Missionary Herald is now placed in the hands of our publisher. The Secretaries of the Society.will, indeed, retain the control and general management; we are confident, however, that the young friend who has aided in furnishing the matter in “ The Church” and “The Appeal” most interesting to the young (besides much other sub-editorial work), and who will render similar assistance in conducting the Juvenile Missionary Herald, will be able to make this little magazine much more interesting to the young than ever. We would press it on the attention of families and Sunday schools, if they have not hitherto taken it, to commence immediately. If they have given it up, let them, then, afford the Juvenile Missionary Herald one trial more.

In public events we have had a somewhat exciting, if it can hardly be called an eventful year. It commenced amidst the upstir caused by the Papal Aggression, a subject on which even our own Denomination was divided in opinion, as well as our ablest Statesmen. Then came the Great Exhibition, the Kaffir War, and the arrival of the noblest European patriot, the Great Kossuth, on our shores. While we write, almost every town in the kingdom is resounding with his well-deserved praise. May a kind Providence still make him the giver of Civil, Religious, and Commercial Freedom to Hungary ! On the Continent it appears to us that the tide of Absolutism is beginning to turn,-not, indeed, willingly, but by force of circumstances. Virtual bankruptcy in one country, disappointed ambition in another, a general feeling pervading the middle classes of Europe that such extreme despotism must overthrow itself, and the vast number of suppressed republicans, ready at any time for revolution, make us fear before many years, perhaps soon, another iv

ADDRESS TO OUR READERS.

violent attempt to set things right. The perfidy, nay, the shameless perjury, of all the sovereigns of Europe in 1848, who were affected by the Revolutions, most of them worse even than our executed or banished Stuarts, forbid the hope of a peaceful adjustment with men whose most solemn oaths are mere instruments of deception and kingcraft. We regret to add that the universal infidelity of the more active minds in all continental nations, infidelity generated by the impostures of Popery and the secular character of Statechurches, prepares men to contend with a ferocity to which happily our countrymen are strangers. The despots establish some creed or creeds from policy. The infidels would tolerate all creeds from contempt. The kingdom of Christ will yet have to conquer by humility, spirituality, benevolence, and suffering. In Protestant Prussia, and still more in Republican France, Baptists are much obstructed and even persecuted.

Ecclesiastical matters at home have mended but little. The Bishops have, indeed, been exposed as gormandizers of wealth to an extent which their enemies had scarcely supposed, and Puseyites are zealously driving at a degree of liberty and self-government, to realize which they must quit a State-church. Amidst all this, new churches are building apace, and being endowed voluntarily too. The Church is gaining in this way faster than Dissent, and doing it amongst increasing populations ; let Dissenters ponder this well. It is, indeed, voluntaryism, but voluntaryism generally for Baptismal Regeneration, and all the worst features of the Prayer-book and Episcopacy,—the portions of it which most annoyed a Newton and a Scott.

In the great work which, in importance, infinitely outweighs all things besides, no conspicuous progress, that we remember, has anywhere been made. The Methodists have lost very largely, owing to the inexorable tyranny of the Conference preachers. The Statechurch conversions have rather been from a lower to a higher degree of superstition. The Independents and Baptists have not enjoyed any noticeable reanimation in religion; though our Association returns to the Union are better than for some years past. We fear, however (and yet hope), that, from some causes, many are not joined to our churches who, some years back, would have joined them. If so, although thankful for their piety, there is need for great searchings of heart, to ascertain the cause, and apply the fitting remedy.

CON TEN TS.

.

Original Articles.

Poetry.
The Time to Die
12 The Dying Christian...

151
My Hope is the Cross. By the Rev. The Sower to his Seed .............. 180
J. Jenkinson
38 Way.worn Pilgrim....

180
Christian Prospects. By the Rev. W.

The Old Man

207
Maclure, of Nassau, New Provi. Meeting in Heaven

232
dence

66
The Butterfly

233
The Mother's Sacrifice. By Mrs. L. An Evening Thought

263
H. Sigourney
95 Christian, Pray!..

288
Look Above !

95
Speak not Harshly.

288

Leaning on the Saviour's Breast.

The Soul's Record

By the Rev. J. Jenkinson

123

to the Romans .............

The Life of Christ..................

39

67

Hints for Studying the Bible. Nos. 1

and 2

96, 124

Geology and Genesis. Nos, 1 and 2 181, 208

PAGE.

PAGB.

The Inspiration of the Holy Scrip-

Syriac Version of the New Testa-

tures..

234

ment

289

On the Word for “Baptize" in the The Inspiration of the Bible

290

Tales and Sketches.

The Baptism of Fire. By H. W. The Young Soldier and the New Tes.

Longfellow

14

tament

182

Religion and Business

16 The World Moves on

185

The Drowning Child

18 The Dying Child's Request..... 186

The Family Altar

40 The Christian Traveler. By a Cana-

Common Faults at Prayer-Meetings. 41 dian Mercbant.....

209

The Two Givers

42 “ She hath done what she could” 212

Past Mercies

42 That One Word ..

214

A Cure for Low Spirits......

68 Sandy Wright and the Poor Orphan.. 235

God uses Means

70 Kind Words to the Erring

239

The Family Altar

71 A Word to the Bereaved

240

“I can't get acquainted with the Mem-

Juana Mendia-the Creole Girl. By

bers of the Church"

72 the Rev. F. Crowe

264

“None of us Liveth to Himself.” By The Prayerless Home. By Professor

the Rev. John Todd

97 Alden...

266

The Dead Speak

99 The Preaching of the Grave

267

“Give Wisely

99 Where are the Nine?"

Have a Place for Prayer

100 The Little Beggar Girl. By Lucy

A Story of the Olden Time. By Old

Linwood

293

Jacob

125 The Child Angel

295

The Power of the Christian Church

The Actress.

296

as an Organization. By Elibu Bur-

A Contrast

297

131 Old Moses...

316

Remembering the Dead

132 The Accepted Time. By Dr. Krum-

Pay your Minister. By Mrs. H. C.

macher

318

Knight

152 “Good Night, Mother' ............ 319

The Sabbath School Teacher's Prayer 153 Alone with God

320

The Father and Three Sons

155

.... 269

ritt.

........

.. 187

Our State Church

77
The Mother's Friend............. 78
Hall's The Crisis

78
Leask's The Last Enemy....

78
Richard's The Pew and its Rent

78
Some Passages from the Life of a

Convert from Anglo-Catholicism to

the Truth as it is in Jesus...... 106
Murch's Voice of Scripture on the
Worship of God in Public

107
Stanford's Friendship with God...... 107
Edwards's Supremacy of the Pope. 134
Barnes's Notes, Explanatory and Prac-
tical, on the Gospels

135
The Public Good

135
Walters's Danger and Destructive Ten-
dency of Novel Reading

135
Moore's Life of Alex. Carson, LL.D... 158
Wylie's Modern Judea compared with
Ancient Prophecy

158
Paterson's Bulwarks of Protestantism 158

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