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whole army. Yet that it was not customary for the commanders of antiquity to expose their persons needlessly, appears from this anecdote preserved by Plutarch. “A rash officer shewing his wounds with exultation to Timotheus, he said to him “ When I was your general against the Samians, I should have been ashamed if an arrow from a catapulta * had fallen near inet."

I have always thought it to be regretted, that, when the new militia was established, the prejudice of the times obliged the legislature to adopt that name instead of some other, as provincial or county regiments. For though militia really means the military establishment of a country, yet so deservedly was the old institution that bore that name become disgraceful, that it was held in universal ridicule. Instances of this occur frequently in our old comedies, and, when they do occur, are always applied to the present institution that goes under the same name, though so widely different in fact. It must be from this cause only, that so many militia officers were induced to take commissions in those heterogeneous corps called fencibles, tu which every ridicule that can attach on the militia must attach, without the honourable motive that induces a country gentleinan to enter into the established constitutional forces of his county. If it should be thought I have gone too far in saying the ridicule incurred by the old militia affects the new, only let

* The catapulta was one of the military engines, which threw very large arrows to a great distance.

# There was a part of the Grecian army called the peltastæ, from pelta, a small shield. This is usually translated targeteers'; but though target is properly the diminutive of targe, as that word ig, obsolete, and target is in common use for a butt to shoot at, it gives us the idea of a shield in general, without any notion of diinunition, like the word PISTOLET in French. Ifa Greek army were drawn up in Hyde-Park, and an aid-du-camp ordered to ride up to the targeteers, he would go without hesitation to the heavy armed foot, from their shields being most conspicuous.

I Those corps only are alluded to, which unite every evil both of regulars and militia, without having the advantage of either, and whose only evd is to injure the recruiting service The military associations, both in the metropolis and the country, are truly re. speetable, and indeed have arisen out of the ipilitia, which is by no means numerous enough to be the sole defence of the country in the hour of danger, but is a harrier immediately ready for the whole country to rally behind. The regular forces are not mentioned, as one of the priucipal advavtages of the militia is the enabling them to defend the country in the most effectual manuer by attacking the territories of the eucmy.

it be remembered, that whenever the farce of the MATOR of GARRAT is performed, bow constantly the satire, levelled solely at the Westminister inilitia, is applied to the county regimeuts; as if it were a good jest to suppose that country clowns were afraid of oxen, and that coun: try squires could not ride..

The exercise of the London trained bands was a subject of ridicule so long ago as the time of Beaumont and Fletcher, as appears in THE KNIGHT OF THE BURNING PESTLE. Perhaps the satire was directed by the soldiers of the old feudal system against the tirst attempt at regu, lar discipline ; who being themselves never trained, but in immediate preparation for actual service, laughed at all other training, just as the regulars now laugh at the militia, and as the regulars have themselves been laughed at for nuilitary parade * in time of peace. If this be so, the success of the Loudon trained bands against the horse at the battle of Newbury, instead of being wonderful, was the natural consequence of the superiority of disciplined, though untried infantry, against, cavalry t. This seeins confirmed by the account of Lord Clarendon.

* That tbe officers in the army are at least indebted to the militia for taking this source of ridicule from them, appears from a poem. called MANNEŘS, written by Paul Whitehead.

Mark our bright youths, how gallant and how gay, • Fresh plum'd and powder'd, in review array ; • Uphurt each feature by the inartial scar,

Lo! Albemarle assumes the god of war. " Yet vain, while prompt to arms by plume and pay, • He takes the soldier's name, from soldier's play, ' This truth, my warrior, treasure in your breast: "A standing soldier is a standing jest.

When bloody battles dwindle lo reviews, • Armies must then become mere puppet shews; • Where the lac'd log may strut the soldier's part, • Bedeck'd with feather, though unarm’d with beart.'

t • The London trained bavošand auxiliary regiments, (of whose inexperience of danger, or any kind of service beyond the easy practice of their postures in the artillery garden, men had then too CHEAP an estimation) behaved themse'ves to wonder; and were in truth the preservation of the army that day. For they stood as a bulwark and ramipire to the rest; and whea their wings of horse were scattered and dispersed, kept their ground so steadily, that though Prince Rupert himself led up the choice horse to charge them, and endured their storm of small shot, he could make no impression upon their stand of pikes, but was forced to wheel about. OF SO SOVEREIGN BENEFIT AND USE IS THAT READINESS, ORDER, AND DEXTERITY IN THE USE OF THEIR ARMS, WHICH HATH BEEN SO MUCH NEGLECTED.' This shews.they were thie only we'l-disciplinci foot in the ariny,

The most zealou's partizan of the militia must acknowledge its weakest part to be the want of proper subordination in the officers. A few singular instances of public spirit excepted, the hope of honour and emolument, and the fear of disgrace and punishment, are the general spurs to huinan industry; and these are wanting to the militia officer. This deficiency in discipline is the most felt in those regiments which are most respectably officered in point of qualification, as the commanding officers of militia will not often be inclined to exact a very strict obedience from persons who have great property and influence in their counties.

The ballotting for the militia, which was taken from the French, is also a defect. If every man ballotted were compelled to serve if able (which is impossible), there would be no injustice, as all would be on an equality. But as no person ever does serve, who can possibly afford to hire a substitute, the ballot is merely gambling who shall pay a most unequal poll-tax. If property were assessed to find soldiers, it would be more just, and the deputy-lieutenants might then be stricter in the choice of men, than coinmon humanity will now permit them to be when the principal is in very low circumstances.

P.

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Ill suited matches are productive of such complicated misery, that it is a wonder it should be necessary to declaim against them, and hy arguments and examples expose the folly, or brand the cruelty of such parents as sacrifice their children to arnbition or avarice. Daily experience indeed shews, that this misconduct of the old, .who, by their wisdom, should be able to direct the young, and who either have, or are thought to have, their welfare in view, is not only subversive of all the bliss of social

Vol. IV.

life, but often gives rise to events of the most tragical nature, As any truth that regards the peace of families cannot be too often inculcared, I make no doubt the following history, the truth of which is known to some in England, and to almost all France, where it happen. ed, will prove acceptable to the public. At Paris, whose splendor and magnificence strikes every stranger with surprise, where motives of pleasure alone seem to direct the actions of the inhabitants, and politeness renders their conversation desirable, scenes of horror are frequent amidst gaiety and delight; and as human nature is there seen in its most amiable light, it may there, likewise, be seen in its most shocking deformity. It must be owned, without compliment to the French, that shining examples of exalted virtue are frequent amongst them ; but when they deviate from its paths, their vices are of as heinous a nature as those of the most abandoned and dissolute heathens. The force of truth has made monsieur Bayle acknowledge, that if all the poisonings ard assignations which the intrigues of Paris give rise to, were known, it would be sufficient to make the inost hardened and profligate shudder. Though such bloody events do not happen so often in London, they are, notwithstanding, but too frequent; and, as the avarice of the old sometimes conspires with the passions of the young to produce them, the story I am going to relate, will, I hope, be not unedifying to the inhabitants of this city.

A citizen of Paris, who, though he could not amass wealth, for the acquisition whereof he had an inordinate passion, made, by his unwearied efforts, wherewithal to maintain his sniall family handsoinely; he had a daughter, whose beauty seemed to be the gift of heaven, bestowed upon her to increase the happiness of mankind, though it proved, in the end, fatal to herself, her lover, and her husband. Monsieur d’Escombas, a citizen advanced in years, could not behold this brilliant beauty without desire ; which was, in effect, according to the witty observation of Mr. Pope, no better than wishing to be the dragon which was to guard the Hesperian fruit. The father of Isabella, for that was the name of the young lady, was highly pleased at meeting with so ad. vantageous a match for his daughter, as old d'Escombas was very rich, and willing to take her without a portion ; which circumstance was sufficient, in the opinion of a man whose ruling passion was a sordid attachment to in

The most zealous partizan of the militia must acknow. ledge its weakest part to be the want of proper subordination in the officers. A few. singular instances of public spirit excepted, the hope of honour and emolument, and the fear of disgrace and punishment, are the general spurs to huinan industry; and these are wanting to the militia officer. This deficiency in discipline is the most felt in those regiments which are most respectably officered in point of qualification, as the commanding

officers of militia will not often be inclined to exact a very · strict obedience from persons who have great property and influence in their counties,

The ballotting for the militia, which was taken from the French, is also a detect. If every man ballotted were compelled to serve if able (which is impossible), there would be no injustice, as all would be on an equality. But as no person ever does serve, who can possibly afford to hire a substitute, the ballot is merely gambling who shall pay a most unequal poll-tax. If property were assessed to find soldiers, it would be more just, and the deputy-lieutenants might then be stricter in the choice of men, than common humanity will now permit them to be when the principal is in very low circumstances.

P.,

THE COLLECTOR.

No. XII.

Collatis undique membris.-Hor.

DISPROPORTIONED MARRIAGES.

Il suited matches are productive of such complicated misery, that it is a wonder it should be necessary to declaim against them, and by arguments and examples expose the folly, or brand the cruelty of such parents as sacrifice their children to ambition or avarice. Daily experience indeed shews, that this misconduct of the old, who, by their wisdom, should be able to direct the young, and who either have, or are thought to have, their welfare in view, is not only subversive of all the bliss of social

Vol. ĮV.

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