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Reaching his dose, walking Moor-fields for lepers,
And offering citizens-wives pomander-bracelets,
As his preservative, made of the elixir ;
Searching the spittle, to make old bawds young;
And the high-ways, for beggars, to make rich :
I see no end of his labours. He will make
Nature asham'd, of her long neep: when art,
Who's but a step-daine, shall do more than she,
In her best love to mankind, ever could.
If his dream last, he'll turn the age to gold.

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A C T II. S CE N E I.

Mammon, Surly.
Ome on, sir. Now, you set your foot on shore

In novo orbe ; here's the rich Peru :
And there within, fir, are the golden mines,
Great Solomon's Ophir ! he was failing to't,
Three
years,

but we have reach'd it in ten months.
This is the day, wherein, to all my friends,
I will pronounce the happy word, be rich.
This day you shall be spectatiffimi.
You shall no more deal with the hollow dye',
Or the frail card. No more be at charge of keeping
The livery-punk, for the young heir, that must
Seal, at all hours, in his shirt. No more,
If he deny, ha' him beaten to't, as he is
That brings him the commodity. No more

"You shall no more deal with the HOLLOW DYE.) This alludes to the way of cheating among gamesters, to make their dice hollow, and then by loading them to make them run high or low. Hence they were called high and low men, and high and low Fulhams. See Every Man out of his Humour, act 3. sc. 6. The high were so loaden, as to run 4, 5, or 6; the low to run 1, 2,

or 3.

Shall

come to

Shall thirst of fattin, or the covetous hunger
Of velvet entrails, for a rude-spun cloke,
To be displaid at madam Augufta's”, make
The sons of Sword and Hazzard fall before
The golden calf, and on their knees, whole nights,
Commit idolatry with wine, and trumpets :
Or go a feasting, after drum and enlign.
No more of this. You shall start up young Viceroys,
And have your punques, and punquetees, my Surly.
And unto thee, I speak it first,

Sir, he'll
Be rich,

Within. Where is my Subtle, there?

you by
Within hough!
Mam. That is his fire-drake,
His ; lungs, his zephyrus, he that puffs his coals,
Till he firk nature up, in her own center.
You are not faithful, sir. This night, I'll change
All, that is metal, in my house, to gold.
And, early in the morning, will I send
To all the plumbers, and the pewterers,
And buy their tin, and lead up: and to Lothbury“,
For all the copper:

Sur. What, and turn that too?
Mam. Yes, and I'll purchase Devonshire, and Corn-

(wall,

and by

* To be display'd at madam AUGUSTA's. ] The mistress of a brothel ; and probably the same whom he elsewhere calls madam Cæsarean. 3 Mam

That is his fire-drake, His LUNGS.) Lungs was a term of art, for the under operators in chemistry, whose business principally was take care of the fire. So Cowley, in his sketch of a philofophic college, in the number of its members reckons two lungs, or chemical servants ; and afterwards, alligning their salaries, To each of the lungs twelve pound.

And to LOTHBURY, For all the copper.] Lothbury, the name of a street in London, at that time inhabited chiefly by founders and braliers.

And

And make them perfect Indies ! you

admire now? Sur. No faith. Mam. But when you see th' effects of the great me

(dicine !
Of which one part projected on a hundred
Of Mercury, or Venus, or the moon,
Shall turn it to as many of the sun ;
Nay, to a thousand, so ad infinitum :
You will believe me.

Sur. Yes, when I see't, I will.
But, if my eyes do cozen me so, (and I
Giving 'em no occasion) sure I'll have
A whore, shall piss 'em out, next day.

Mam. Ha! why?
Do you think, I fable with you? I assure you
He that has once the flower of the sun,
The perfect ruby, which we call elixir,
Not only can do that, but, by its virtue,
Can confer honour, love, respect, long life,
Give safety, valour, yea, and victory,
To whom he will. In eight and twenty days,
I'll make an old man, of fourscore, a child.

Sur. No doubt, he's that already.

Mam. Nay, I mean, Restore his years, renew him, like an eagle, To the fifth age; make him get sons and daughters, Young giants; as our philosophers have done (The antient patriarchs afore the food) But taking, once a week, on a knives point, The quantity of a grain of mustard of it: Become stout Marses, and beget young cupids. Sur. The decay’d vestals of pickt-hatch would

[thank you, That keep the fire alive, there.

Mam. 'Tis the secret
Of nacure naturiz'd ’gainst all infections,
Cures all diseases, coming of all causes;

А

A month's grief in a day; a year's in twelve:
And, of what age foever, in a month.
Paft all the doses of your drugging doctors.
I'll undertake, withal, to fright the plague
Out o' the kingdom, in three months s.

Sur. And I'll
Be bound, the players shall sing your praises, then,
Without their poets.

Mam. Sir, I'll do't Mean time,
I'll give away so much unto my man,
Shall serve th' whole city, with preservative,
Weekly; each house his dose, and at the rate-

Sur. As he that built the water-work, do's with
Mam. You are incredulous.

(water?
Sur. Faith I have a humour,
I would not willingly be gulld. Your stone
Cannot transmute me.

Mam. Pertinax, Surly,
Will you believe antiquity ? records ?
I'll shew you a book, where Moses and his sister,
And Solomon have written of the art ;
I, and a treatise penn’d by Adanı?.
Sur. How !

Mam.

5 I'll undertake, withal, to fright the plague

Out o' the kingdom, in three months.] The defence which Dr. Anthony published of himself at Cambridge in 1610, is called Medicina chymicæ & veri porabilis auri afertio, ex lucubrationibus Fra. Anthonii Londinensis in medicina doloris. It is divided into seven chapters: the last enumerates the several distempers which his aurum patatile cures; among which is the plague itself; as he asserts to have been demonstrated by experience, in the plague which depopulated London in 1602.

6 As he that built the water-work, do's with water.] He, viz. Sir Hugh Middleton, as Mr. Upton too remarks: the New River was brought to London much about this time.

7 I'll fhew you a book, where Muses, and his fifter, And Solomon have written of the art ; 1, and a treatise pernd by Alam.] The writers on chemistry carry VOL. III. C

their

Mam. O'the philosophers stone, and in high Dutch.
Sur. Did Adam write, sir, in high Dutch ?

Mam. He did :
Which proves it was the primitive tongue.
Sur. What paper

? Mam. On cedar board.

Sur. O that, indeed (they say) Will last 'gainst worms.

Mam. 'Tis like your Irish wood, 'Gainst cob-webs. I have a piece of Jason's feece, too, Which was no other than a book of alchemy, Writ in large sheep-skin, a good fat ram-vellum?. Such was Pythagoras' thigh, Pandora's tub; And, all that fable of Medea's charms, The manner of our work : the bulls, our furnace, Still breathing fire: our argent-vive, the dragon : The dragons teeth, mercury sublimate, That keeps the whiteness, hardness, and the biting; And they are gather'd into Jason's helm, (Th'alembick) and then sow'd in Mars his field, And thence sublim'd so often, till they ’re fix'd. their pretensions very high ; and in the catalogue of authors who have wrote on the subject, are numbered Mofcs, and Miriam, and even Adam himself. Besides those mentioned by Fabricius, the reader may consult the history of chemiltry prefixed to Dr. Shaw's edition of Boerhave.

8 Sur. Did Adam write, fir, in high-Dutch? Mam. He did: Which proves it was the primitize tongue.] A very humorous allusion to the fantastical conceit of Goropius Becanus, who undertook to maintain the teutonick language to be the primitive tongue, and the same which Adam himself (pake in Paradise.

- I have a piece of Jafon's fieece too, Which was no other than a book of alchemy, Writ in large freep-skin, a good fat ram-vel’um.] Our learned author takes this circumftance from Suidas ; Το μυθολογάμενον χρυσείου depas 6.67oou δερμασι γεγραμμενον περιεχος οπως δει δια χημειας χρυσον spyaT:094 Vid. Surd. in voc. depars. The poet with great humour, in the following verses, ridicules the attempt of writers, who, having fixed on a favourite hypothesis, explain all the antient mythology in its support; and suppose it involved in all the fictions and fables

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of the poets.

Both

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